Hot answers tagged

9

I've found success with two approaches: Yoga, whatever flavor or sequence you happen to like. What I did was go to classes several times a week for a month, then practice at home in the morning with intermittent ventures to group classes. Tom Kurz' morning stretch and warm-up series, recommended for combat sports and general health. You take a few minutes ...


8

Relevance of front and overhead squats as warm-up for back squats Warm-up sets are meant to prepare the entire body for the heavy challenge of the work sets. They're not used to practice other lifts, or to be challenging in themselves. Warm-ups are there to increase flexibility and blood flow, and to practice impeccable form in preparation for the challenge ...


7

There really isn't a convenient time to workout no matter who you are. It's a lot of work, you get sweaty, you need to change your clothes, and it usually involves going somewhere other than your home or work. I try to do strength training three days a week, usually around ~3pm. The gym is empty, I can actually get in and out much faster than the busier ...


6

I agree with @Dave Liepman and @Fredob that yoga is a great way to keep flexible and balanced. Yoga is ideal for growing older gracefully with flexibility and balance. Given that you meditate, yoga should be a nice fit for you. My favorite morning routine however, is Joseph Weisberg's 3 minute stretching routine that targets the whole body with six 30 ...


6

I truly believe dietitians are underrated. I would suggest seeing one, even if it might cost money. Some supermarkets even have an in-house dietitian who could help you determine how to alter your meal plans, and then give a quick "tour" of the store so that you know where to buy those items. I do not think there is any one good time to go the gym. If that ...


6

What you’re describing is Exercise Adaptation, or, “training plateau”. It’s a common response to exercise stress. From the National Academy of Sports… The principle of adaptation refers to the process of the body getting accustomed to a particular exercise or training program through repeated exposure. As the body adapts to the stress of the new ...


6

Most "guys in the gym" have absolutely no idea what they are doing. There are certain exercises that you can really do pretty much every day for the rest of your life with good results. If you were using a lot of weight, you might want to do them every other day. That's the premise behind most strength training plans: they pick the most valuable barbell ...


5

As a former competitive bodybuilder, I can tell you that there is no one recipe for gaining mass. My "pros" and "cons" for a routine would not be the same for you. That's because everyone is an individual. It's all about forcing your muscles to overcome their desire to adapt to workload. One sure way to help that is to change up your training routine as ...


5

Since your stated goals are to gain mass and to lose some bodyfat, I highly recommend that you consider the Starting Strength Program. With it, you can use your gym time much more efficiently and gain strength and useful bodymass much more quickly. When you're stronger, losing bodyfat is easier.


4

I try do 5-6 straight forward yoga "sun salutations" every morning. The purpose is to get myself started, not to be - as you said - the main source of exercise. For me, this takes about 5-7 minutes. Last year (2011), of my 366 yoga trainings, this routine was counted for more than half (196 ones)


4

If you're doing 4x8, I think doing 4x10 would be a better increase in volume than 5x8. Being able to do another set isn't going to stimulate growth. Lifting the same weight for more reps will be harder and stimulate at least some improvement in strength-endurance. Better than both of those options would be to increase the weight and decrease the volume. Add ...


4

My coach in college taught me the "below the throat" idea, where if you have any symptoms below your throat, you should hold off from training. Any muscle aches, back pain, lung tightness, rashes, etc. If it's really and only a head cold I'd bring up these two points: Don't infect other people. The people going to that gym will be close to you, using the ...


4

For biceps whole week to rest is way too much. Chest usually needs 2 days of rest. Your front actons of deltoids can be a bit tired, during shoulders day. Well, that also depends on your age. I can't see legs, back here. Even if you don't want to build them up - that is good for testosterone level, at least. So your chest can gain from that. To be more ...


4

No, regardless of your goals, that is not a good workout routine. a) No leg work, b) no back work, c) too much pushing work, d) too much arm work. Assuming from your question that you can train on Monday / Tuesday / Thursday / Friday, then you'd be much better doing either a push / pull split, or an upper lower split. How this would look is either: ...


4

What is the most likely parameter to be changed to see normal gains within non-responders? TL;DR: Sleep 8+ hours a night, eat high quality food concentrating on protein and fibre, drink enough water, find ways to keep stress to a minimum. I'll give you three that people often overlook: Sleep Diet (and hydration) Stress One of the biggest jumps I had in ...


3

I hate answering with a question, but you really should have a solid answer to what are your goals? In short, you want to stress your system enough to cause adaptation. The four cycles go: Initial fitness (what you walk into the weight room with). Training (weakening your body through targeted stress). Recovery (your body is actively repairing you through ...


3

It is not easy to build your own practice, but it is well worth the effort. Once established, you'll have much more benefit compared to someone who occasionally visits yoga classes. There are a few things that need to be addressed when building the practice of your own: Discipline: you need to get on the mat, day in, day out. This doesn't just mean ...


3

The main (good) reason why it's recommended to change your routine every so often is psychological, but it's a double edged sword. On the one hand, if you do the same routine every time, you might get bored, you might stop challenging yourself because you know what you can do. On the other hand, since you do know pretty well what kind of weights you can ...


3

You are right, you can't recover as well as you could when you were in college. Such is the nature of the human body. However, you can do a few things to give your body the best chance at recovering: Eat enough. If you want to progress and work at 70-90% RM in your gym workouts then you need to eat enough to help your body recover. Work out your TDEE and ...


3

For the first part of your question, 500m in 30 minutes is slightly faster than floating with the waves, unfortunately. Top high school boys will be near 4:30 (4 minutes 30 seconds) for that distance, girls will be 15ish seconds slower. However, this combined with the leg pain in the kicking portion tells me that most likely you have a form problem, that ...


3

Taxing on the body Doing all your compound lifts in one day is a lot of volume for your body to contend with, especially if your lifting heavy weight. Compound lifts predominantly target the upper/front body parts E.G. bench press, military press and dips. It's only pull-ups, bent over rows (and deadlifts to an extent) that work the upper back. Time ...


3

Obviously, you should make sure you're warmed up before attempting any of these. Answer 1: I can do you one better, I'll give you full body training in 4 minutes! Enter, the tabata protocol (thank me later). Honestly, Dan John does a much better job of explaining it than I can. I believe he now only recommends front squats, so I'll use that as an example (...


2

I used to work with a university hockey team so although it`s not the same sport, the principles are similar. Here`s what a typical week would look like. Monday: gym workout (intense) and hockey practice Tuesday: hockey practice Wednesday: gym workout (intense) and hockey practice Thursday: gym workout (more sport specific than lifting weight) and hockey ...


2

A lot of people are stuck in the idea that working out is the main course of action when dropping body fat. While exercise is great, dropping from 330 to 320lbs requires you to re-evaluate your diet as a whole and will be the key to your success. The workout routine part is a supplement to that change. I've seen tons of people who workout on a daily basis ...


2

I also have some concerns about the volume here. There are some really strong folks who have a bit more economy in the weight room--even if their goals are size. Some of the guidelines that I've read from more than one source and I quite like are: No more than 5 exercises per training day 1-2 main lifts for strength, with 2-3 assistance/body building ...


2

There are several accepted ways to carb cycle, a discipline that has been in use for a couple decades now. Let's first cover some basics on carb levels: Below 120g/day: ketogenic levels. Ketosis is a useful tool for burning fat, however it does affect your strength levels. 120-130g/day: Minimum levels needed for your brain and thyroid to function normally....


2

If you can get your hand on P90X Yoga, give it a try; it's an hour and half though. It has all the yoga moves you've seen in other programs, and the movements are slow and steady. The instructor also shows you modified versions of the moves, just in case you are not strong enough to perform the hard ones. It also has some extra exercises, specifically ...


2

If you've undergone strength building programs such as Strong Lift's 5X5, then, the only way you'll derive much benefits from a 45-lb plate is through high intensity and high repetitions/sets. While compound exercises are highly recommended, a lot of high repetitions/sets exercises are isolation movements (which allows some parts of the body to rest while ...


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