8

If you're trying to lose weight my suggestion is to focus on your diet. Focus on eating less calories than you are expending and you will lose weight. Exercise is great for your health but will do little (relative to dieting) for your weight. Since you're just starting to exercise I suggest not trying to do too much too soon as it may result in injury and ...


6

I'm also going to disagree with Kneel-Before-ZOD. There's nothing wrong with running completely barefoot outdoors. You just need to look where you're running, stay relaxed, and run properly. Regardless of whether you're running actually barefoot or with minimal shoes, the keys to remember are: Shorten your stride. Traditional running shoes make it easy to ...


6

There is a certain technique of foot strike that runners use for distance running, and that's known as midfoot striking. Your issue, commonly known as runner's knee, seems to be likely from the biomechanical issue discussed in this article. In essence, if your footfalls are striking hard on the heel, then the entire shock of the impact is traveling ...


5

Side stitches are quite common while running. It's typically a cramp in the diaphragm which is a muscle just underneath the ribs and below the lungs. People don't actually know what causes side-stitches, but there are theories. Breathing. Commonly people will have very erratic breathing while running. They do very quick, short huffs. Ideally, you should be ...


4

I found that running minimalist/barefoot corrected my running form pretty quickly and naturally without any special effort on my part. You body just won't let you slam your heel into the ground like you can when you're wearing regular shoes. If you do, you'll feel the bone-jolt all the way up your body and it will shake your fillings loose! Also, running ...


3

It seems that you've already answered above in the question. I'd just like to add at least two thoughts. 1st is that there are several running techniques, such as pose, and evolution running, to mention just two others. I believe that pelvic rotation should play a part in all of them, but perhaps in different ways. 2nd, is that it'd be useful if you ...


3

I agree with the first comment to your question, check with a doctor first and get a checkup (gotta make sure your body can handle the stress of exercise). Assuming you are OK'ed by the doctor, 4k in 20 minutes within a 90 day timespan seems quite impossible. However, I have no idea about your past physical fitness but given the asthma and other problems I ...


3

According to your comments, you normally run a 5k, and you doubled that. I would caution you against suddenly increasing your mileage when running, as it is easy to get overuse injuries related to the sudden jump. I would also (if you don't already) track the mileage use on your shoes, as most shoes have a life of 3-600 total miles before they should be ...


3

In general you should simply relax your body and let gravity "pull" you down the hill, and the effect will be that you'll take longer steps but without increasing energy for that. On the other hand, when facing quite steep downhills it takes a while to get used to it and it is easy to actually add more energy than necessary due to that you will speed up too ...


3

As you're alluding to, there are many answers to this, but they can get vague and debatable. Let me give you a concrete one though. Drafting There's a great runner's movie called Without Limits about Steve Prefontaine. This is the most relevant scene, but the theme is throughout the movie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLefVdWUzbE When Pre was in high ...


2

I have played around with this subject too, especially when I run in my huarache sandals. They slap the ground quite loudly and you can hear me coming a mile away. I read a good tip to combat this problem. When you're running, try to imagine that you are running on delicate rice paper. Land as if you're trying your best not to tear the paper - run softly, no ...


2

Brief answer: Don't give up. Full marathons are complex and tough to get right. Think carefully about hydration and nutrition during the race. I used to run competitively. My marathon PR is 2:32 in Chicago. But I've also run some miserable full marathons. Even shorter races like 10K, I've known I was in much better shape than my race. My best advice about ...


2

Unfortunately, it's hard to impossible to tell what kind of running/plant style you have by looking down at your feet. Mainly, this is because you can't really see the mechanics of what your heel/ankle/foot are doing in relation to each other as you go through the land/plant/push cycle, especially when in shoes. It almost requires a rear view of some kind. ...


2

The answers that listed breathing as being important have probably almost nailed it, with one clarification/improvement needed: Yes, controlling your breathing is critical. However, the best way I've ever found is to ensure my breathing pattern takes up an ODD number of steps. So if its a nice easy run, and my inhale is three steps, my exhale will be two. ...


2

If you know what a stitch is, I’m going to assume you know enough about running pains and rule out anything extreme like appendicitis, which is typically lower anyhow. There’s a few things I would do: Eat carbs and salt half an hour before your run. A few chips/crisps would be decent. Hydrate. Stitches are commonly accompanied when not enough water is ...


2

Another thing, alluded to by @brian-reddy above, is tapering. When you're training, you're not recovering completely from the previous run. This is because: You would only train once a week. There's value in training a little bit tired. When you're training you're not typically running as fast as you can very often. But when there's a race, you taper ...


1

Disclaimer: I'm not an expert and you need to ask a good physio/sports-doctor. In my experience (also backed up by that of many others, just check bodybuilding related forums), the body adapts to whatever activity you regularly engage it in. This is one of the major reasons people are often advised to switch up their workouts/routine when they plateau at a ...


1

You may want to consider switching shoes. Running is basically managing overuse injuries; that's the upper limit that keeps you from just going out and doing 20 miles of speedwork every day. I found that switching shoes was enough to change some dynamics enough to give certain injuries a break and allow me to keep knocking out miles. It's not a magic ...


1

Soleus Function The soleus assists the gastroc and other muscles in the posterior leg during the gait cycle lifting the heel off the ground during propulsion. It stabilizes the ankle - preventing it from flexing as it decelerates forward momentum of the tibia. The muscle also has a very strong force turing the foot outward or supination, which stabilizes ...


1

I had a pair of Merrell barefoot running shoes that I used to use for every day as opposed to running. They wore through in about 6 months. I went into a specialist running shop to get some more and asked about them wearing out so quickly, and was told that because of the minimalist nature of them and the soft material they were made from, they weren't ...


1

As others have said, start off slow. You didn't gain 150 lbs in a few months, you aren't going to lose 150 lbs in a few months. You will have ups and downs, and your losses will be disproportionately greater in the initial phases of your workouts than they will later on. As others have said, get the doctor's OK first. Start slow. If you really want to get ...


1

From your post you seem to focus a lot on running distance and time as measure of achievement. You should absolutely set yourself a goal to help your motivation, but I would advise you more caution in the beginning phase, to avoid injuries which are only going to set you back. As an athlete, I've learned that the most important alarm bell you should never ...


1

I think that the best thing for you to do would be to start off slow. Just try to do a small amount of cardio once a week for 30 minutes or so (you can run anywhere!). It doesn't matter how far you go for now you just need to change your current habits and get in to a routine (easier said than done, I know). Once you feel comfortable with doing that on a ...


1

Normally when people ask how to increase their speed in running, the answer is simply "run more". However, you have that part pretty good, injuries notwithstanding. There are two concepts that you need to add into your program on a regular basis as far as speedwork, and that is threshold and interval training. Interval training raises your top end speed, ...


1

As Geoff said, don't give up! The single most effective thing you can do is have continuous week-after-week, month-after-month fitness improvement. This means running 3 - 4 times per week, 20 - 40 miles per week, pretty much year round. In terms of figuring out your race targets, let the McMillan running calculator be your guide. https://www....


1

I would tell your coach where you are sore then have them give you specifically watch your form during your training and during your races. It could be that your form is great when you are strong but as you tire it degrades and you are overcompensating on one leg. This will cause your other leg to work less. This would explain the imbalance. I would also ...


1

Disclaimer: I am not an expert in running form or podiatry. This is my own experience. I have a bunion on one foot, which was I suspect caused by over-aggressive rock climbing shoes, but when it flares up it can also make running painful. What seems to set off the pain is shoes that put lateral pressure on my toes (i.e. squeeze my toes together). What ...


1

There seems to be some good info in Experiences with 'barefoot' running for this. I'm going to disagree with Kneel Before Zod, at least partially. I am agreed that running actually barefooted can be dangerous unless you've put some time into conditioning your feet. That said, the use of minimalist running shoes means the only thing you're losing from ...


1

most probably your using to much of your heel like i used to, when you run or even walk for that matter, always pounce off from cushioned part of the foot underneath the toes (i know you understand what i mean), trust me its nothing to do with some knee syndrome or anything like that, thats simply finding a complicated answer for a simple question. just don'...


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