4

Yes! It's quite common for runners to change shoes, socks, shirts, etc. in the middle of a race. If you feel that it would be helpful for you then try it out in training and then implement it in some race. Update: answering @Pacerier's question Ultras have regular aid stations where you can get water (at least) and food. Many ultras will note particular ...


3

My guess is they don't quite fit. You might need a slightly bigger shoe, most places recommend a half size larger as your feet tend to swell(which is probably why it hurt after 20 mins). The other general recommendation is to have about a thumbs width between big toe and top of shoe (NYTimes, 2010). If your store has a generous return policy(as you ...


3

I am a veteran runner (and I have also suffered ITBS when I began to run). Even worse, I have what's called "Morton's Toe" so that I am not even supposed to be running according to orthopaedics and podiatrists I am very sceptic in regard to stability additions to shoes for beginners and gait analysis. The reasons for that is common sense: When you ...


3

In most cases, it is not as much the feet being physically significantly different in structure as it is the leg length and imbalance in leg muscles causing slightly different movements in different feet. These issues result in an inefficient running gait even if there's nothing wrong with the feet. You can do the following to help fix the problem - Check ...


3

To make the transition you need to slowly incorporate minimalist shoes or you'll injure yourself. Even just walking. Your body will need time to adjust to forefoot striking. Its not like just buying another pair of padded sneakers. My first pair of Minimalist shoes are the New Balance Minimus Trails. The 10v2 model. True minimalist shoes have no heel to toe ...


3

With modern running shoes, especially if you buy the same brand/model, there really is no need to break them in any more. It is only if you change models and/or brands that your first runs in them should be shorter, but that is in case your feet rub different in the shoes than in the ones you are used to. So it isn't so much your shoes but your feet that ...


3

According to your comments, you normally run a 5k, and you doubled that. I would caution you against suddenly increasing your mileage when running, as it is easy to get overuse injuries related to the sudden jump. I would also (if you don't already) track the mileage use on your shoes, as most shoes have a life of 3-600 total miles before they should be ...


3

For me, what I look for is practicality. Do they have good grip, are they comfortable and how much weight the shoe has. The grip for those sorts of sports 100% has to be good, otherwise you're going to be at a disadvantage. How comfortable the shoes are is pretty self explanatory, you don't want to be doing sports with an uncomfortable feeling from your ...


3

The first step is to go to a running or fitness store that sells shoes and talk to one of the shoe specialists. They should have knowledge about the shoes and, in my experiences, will watch you walk and run, talk to you about your running experience (how long you've been running, what distances you run, what surfaces you typically run on or plan to run on), ...


2

EVA is fine in moderation, and as others have said it wears/compresses relatively quickly. For the most part shoes are just tools. There are different types of shoes for different jobs; and any shoe/tool used improperly is going to be less efficient if not destructive. Running is an interesting sport in that everyone assumes they already know how to run. "...


2

As an addition to what has been said already, here are some exercises that will help you: The author is a podiatrist who is also a triathlete and minimalist/ barefoot runner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRS88R1BAg8 They helped me a lot (I do 80-90% of my training in MT10)


2

That sounds exactly like what I had when training for my third half marathon after a long-ish break from running. In my case, it didn't really fall nicely into any "usual" description such as ITB-related problems. It was a chronic pain in the front and slightly to the outside of the hip, roughly near the joint between thigh and hip, but more to the side from ...


2

Baby powder. Blow it in your socks, blow it on your toes, and you will be good for at least a few hours.


2

I have been in the same position as you. I have very flat feet, as well as overpronation (they often come together) and I was told I needed orthopedic inserts. I did that for a while, and it didn't work for me. I switched to VFF's, and I did so very carefully. I did all sorts of foot exercises that I found on their website and others, in preparation for ...


2

I recently made the swap to Minimalist shoes adapting forefoot running. I had tried swapping my shoes for 4-6 hours at a time to start out with at work, since I walk all day long at work. That week was the worst because I had pushed myself too hard since I was so eager. My knees, shins, heels all screamed at me to knock it off. I took a step back into my ...


2

I experienced the same problem and I might have figured out the answer: The heat is caused by friction. This friction is produced because your feet can move within your shoe...so my suggestion is get some thicker, breathable socks.


2

A good shoe will adapt to your foot over time of using it. You want it to be comfortable at all times during running. I would stick with the suggestion of buying it at the end of the day. A walk into town should warm your feet up to their normal working size and shape.


2

I'd check out thinner merino wool socks or a synthetic sock specific to 'cooling.' Merino wool and specific synthetics pull sweat from the feet and help keep them cooler. Generally speaking. For example the Smartwool PhD Run (Ultra) Lights or Wigwam Ultra Cools. Even more specifically I'd look for thin double layer socks, which sounds thicker true. But, two ...


2

Unfortunately, it's hard to impossible to tell what kind of running/plant style you have by looking down at your feet. Mainly, this is because you can't really see the mechanics of what your heel/ankle/foot are doing in relation to each other as you go through the land/plant/push cycle, especially when in shoes. It almost requires a rear view of some kind. ...


2

So at the end of the day there is not a ton you can do. It's all about static friction and no matter what if you add water as a layer between the surface you're running on and your shoes the coefficient of static friction will be decreased. What you can do is look into trail running shoes. They are intentionally built with more support and traction for ...


2

I'm not aware of/ couldn't find any studies on affecting performance. This study from 2014 states that no studies on performance have not been done on a wide scale. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/268631549_The_Effect_of_Footwear_on_Running_Performance_and_Running_Economy_in_Distance_Runners A quote from this meta-analysis: The reason that the ...


2

I have high arches so I in a way know what you're going through.. I'd suggest going to a podiatrist and getting a custom made set of orthotics for your feet that you can slip in your running shoes. Feet are very unique, especially if you only have one flat foot, so relying on running shoes with an insert designed for you is going to be difficult. You just ...


1

I had a pair of Merrell barefoot running shoes that I used to use for every day as opposed to running. They wore through in about 6 months. I went into a specialist running shop to get some more and asked about them wearing out so quickly, and was told that because of the minimalist nature of them and the soft material they were made from, they weren't ...


1

Is your experience growing up that you went barefoot a lot? I did, as most of my youth was spent at swimming pools. My doctor once commented that I had "luau feet" - a wider spread that he attributed to being barefoot a lot over the years. The shoes are not designed to be narrow and constricting, they are narrow because most people, at least in the USA, ...


1

Our feet absorb more force during running as compare to other body parts.So you should give extra care to your feet because foot is the most frequently injured part of the body.Proper shoe selection should be there, once you purchase right shoes then you need to maintain them and replace them when they are worn out.


1

Pay attention to if your feet are rubbing or not, I find the socks I use make the difference. I tried some short basic cotton socks and my feet get very hot. Then I got some puma socks that are meant for running and breathe a lot (my shoes also breathe pretty well) and I noticed a major difference. Make sure your shoes are good for your feet. I'm not ...


1

I can sympathize with your problem. My feet get really hot when I'm running as well. My solution for the problem was to move to minimalist shoes, in my case, a set of Xero Shoes sandals. They don't work for everyone — and they do necessitate learning a different running technique for most people as you no longer have artificial cushioning around your heel, ...


1

I don't think there's any particular shoe you'd need, but a couple of things you won't need: Waterproofness. You're inside on a treadmill. Offroad / trial runners. They're generally heavier and can handle more traction which you won't need. High mileage rubber. The treadmill surface is much softer than a road, so you really don't need the durability. Other ...


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