11

You can... But in my experience, it's better to use that 7th eyelet slightly differently to prevent heel slipping. It is shown in this video starting around 1:47: To the video Steps (images from Health on the Run): Create a loop using the last two eyelets. Put the shoelace through the hole on the opposite side. Put on the shoe and pull the laces tight ...


7

It sounds like you're off to a great start with minimalist shoes. The first rule is to start slow and increase usage gradually, and you have done so. The shoes Make sure the shoes fit perfectly. You can get blisters and pain in minimalist shoes pretty easily, especially on long runs, if they don't fit perfectly or you're not wearing them correctly. Also, ...


7

There really is no "conclusive" proof at the current time, and not likely to be any in the near future. Part of the problem is that Chi/Pose and the natural styles of running also have a very lucrative market for shoe companies. Pretty much every shoe company now makes minimalist type shoes, and there are entire companies (Newton) that make only fore/mid ...


6

Disclaimer: I specialize in gait analysis, so obviously I'm heavily biased. What are your options for footwear? No shoes, so barefoot running Minimal shoes, like Vibrams Run-of-the-mill running shoe (sub 100$) High end neutral shoe High end correcting shoe If you've decided the first two options aren't for you, you're going to have to pick a shoe. That ...


5

I usually have 8-900 km in pair of shoes... After 100 km I measure the sole depth and when it is 10-20 % less - usually 3-4 mm after 8-900 km - I start looking for new shoes... Very unscientific... but it works for me :-) EDIT: By the way: Basically I use a normal ruler. I put in inside the shoe and measure the hight to the next shelf in my bookcase... ...


5

Usually none. I tried several things including swimming "socks". It doesn't matter, sand gets in them and drives you nuts. Barefoot is the way to go. You will get used to it after just a couple weeks.


5

If you're just starting out running, you have a great opportunity to make the effort to learn correct form now before developing any bad habits. Minimalist shoes indeed can help to encourage a certain type of foot landing, because the lack of cushioning or heel rise makes it easier to land on the fore- or mid-foot and heel striking will feel uncomfortable or ...


4

Yes! It's quite common for runners to change shoes, socks, shirts, etc. in the middle of a race. If you feel that it would be helpful for you then try it out in training and then implement it in some race. Update: answering @Pacerier's question Ultras have regular aid stations where you can get water (at least) and food. Many ultras will note particular ...


4

Good shoes can make the difference between enjoying running, and dreading going out the door. Especially if you are going to be running a half marathon, then you are going to be putting in a lot of miles in preparation and then the race itself. If you have never had a gait analysis done, I would highly suggest that you have it done. And yes, while it is ...


4

As you note, the 500K notion is just a rule of thumb. I am a pretty big guy (250+ pounds) and my shoes wear out much faster than 500K. I am lucky if I get 300K out of a pair. You can see the crushed and worn out sole (Of course some of that is my goofy running stride, leading to strange wear patterns). So sole wear depth is another hint. As the sole ...


3

I agree with Ivo's answer, that making sure your foot doesn't wobble around in the shoe has primary importance. That being said, I know the problem of achilles-chafing from extensive hiking tours. I would pre-emptively stick band-aids up and down my achilles, and then cover it with a good hiking sock. At first it feels unnatural, but after a while I tend to ...


3

No, it will not go away. Unless you do something about it. Since you've been running in Vibrams for "quite a while" your feet should have adapted by now, and you should be able to run without pain in your feet. The muscles in your feet should have gained enough strength after 4-8 weeks. The joints, connective tissue, and tendons might well take longer; ½-1 ...


3

Scientific studies do not seem to support the seemingly commonsense idea that cushioning in your shoes protects you from injury: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18801775 . When you run with less cushioning, your brain apparently subconsciously adjusts your stride to keep the forces the same. This suggests that you save your money and keep using a pair of ...


3

There's no universal cap on barefoot running. People do ultramarathons barefoot, and marathons that are entirely on asphalt. But pretty much any source on barefoot/minimalist running advice is going to tell you to ease into it to build up the strength in your feet. If doing more than 10k causes you pain, listen to your body and keep it to shorter runs for ...


3

To make the transition you need to slowly incorporate minimalist shoes or you'll injure yourself. Even just walking. Your body will need time to adjust to forefoot striking. Its not like just buying another pair of padded sneakers. My first pair of Minimalist shoes are the New Balance Minimus Trails. The 10v2 model. True minimalist shoes have no heel to toe ...


3

My guess is they don't quite fit. You might need a slightly bigger shoe, most places recommend a half size larger as your feet tend to swell(which is probably why it hurt after 20 mins). The other general recommendation is to have about a thumbs width between big toe and top of shoe (NYTimes, 2010). If your store has a generous return policy(as you ...


3

I am a veteran runner (and I have also suffered ITBS when I began to run). Even worse, I have what's called "Morton's Toe" so that I am not even supposed to be running according to orthopaedics and podiatrists I am very sceptic in regard to stability additions to shoes for beginners and gait analysis. The reasons for that is common sense: When you ...


3

In most cases, it is not as much the feet being physically significantly different in structure as it is the leg length and imbalance in leg muscles causing slightly different movements in different feet. These issues result in an inefficient running gait even if there's nothing wrong with the feet. You can do the following to help fix the problem - Check ...


3

With modern running shoes, especially if you buy the same brand/model, there really is no need to break them in any more. It is only if you change models and/or brands that your first runs in them should be shorter, but that is in case your feet rub different in the shoes than in the ones you are used to. So it isn't so much your shoes but your feet that ...


3

According to your comments, you normally run a 5k, and you doubled that. I would caution you against suddenly increasing your mileage when running, as it is easy to get overuse injuries related to the sudden jump. I would also (if you don't already) track the mileage use on your shoes, as most shoes have a life of 3-600 total miles before they should be ...


3

For me, what I look for is practicality. Do they have good grip, are they comfortable and how much weight the shoe has. The grip for those sorts of sports 100% has to be good, otherwise you're going to be at a disadvantage. How comfortable the shoes are is pretty self explanatory, you don't want to be doing sports with an uncomfortable feeling from your ...


3

The first step is to go to a running or fitness store that sells shoes and talk to one of the shoe specialists. They should have knowledge about the shoes and, in my experiences, will watch you walk and run, talk to you about your running experience (how long you've been running, what distances you run, what surfaces you typically run on or plan to run on), ...


2

EVA is fine in moderation, and as others have said it wears/compresses relatively quickly. For the most part shoes are just tools. There are different types of shoes for different jobs; and any shoe/tool used improperly is going to be less efficient if not destructive. Running is an interesting sport in that everyone assumes they already know how to run. "...


2

A minimalist running shoe would be optimal, but I doubt that you should invest in one of those just to try forefoot striking. You can run and walk on your forefoot in every shoe, although the rigid sole or heavy cushioning might make things complicated. I started running on my forefoot last fall, the shoes I used weren't even proper running shoes (more like ...


2

I ran long distances for two years in minimalist shoes, and have just now realized that yes, minimalist shoes are great for improving your form and reducing injury, but they still mask just enough of your senses to make it harder to perfect your form—specifically, running efficiently with as little impact as possible. Also, minimalist shoes need to fit quite ...


2

As an addition to what has been said already, here are some exercises that will help you: The author is a podiatrist who is also a triathlete and minimalist/ barefoot runner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRS88R1BAg8 They helped me a lot (I do 80-90% of my training in MT10)


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