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As you've discovered, the 10% rule isn't really applicable to someone who is completely new to running. It requires that you already have an established weekly running volume that you can tolerate, so it's really only for already established runners. As a beginner, you'd be better off starting with a dedicated beginner program, such as Couch to 5k, which can ...


5

When you are starting a running program, the goal is to run the number of minutes that your body can tolerate and no more. If you over do it, you will join the ranks of the couch potatoes. Here is a plan that worked for me. Walk thirty minutes. Then run 1 minute. Then walk home. You continue running just one minute until one minute becomes easy for ...


3

Measure it out in paces At home, take a tape measure and stand with your back to a wall, heels touching the wall. Take one normal step forward, then measure from the back of your heel to the wall in centimeters. This is your pace length. Let's say you measure 60cm. Now, convert the bleep test distance (20m) to centimeters by multiplying it by 100, which is ...


2

The fact which I see in some workout plans is lack of focus on the muscles recovery, your one doesn't seem to be like that, but I believe running long distance without any break will results in increase in the time taken by muscles for recovery. If you're beginner and you're just starting your workout routine then don't try to overuse your muscles which will ...


2

I think that you're running into one of the limitations of an overly simplistic model like "80/20". Note that I'm not saying the idea behind it is bad, but the way it's being conveyed loses much of the nuance. To speak to what I believe to be the spirit of the model, don't stress about the distance or time per se. Rather make 20% of your runs be ...


1

I'm to a physician, so there might also be a medical answer to your question. I think, however, that it is not wise to include the 10% increment just to one run. If your are running to become fitter and if you also want to increase your stamina, you should vary your runs. This means, that you should have one tempo run, one long run, a recovery run and an ...


1

Long overdue Here is a 12-week plan with more info on this link yet I would not recommend you to neither follow the plan nor do any ultras based on the very limited information that you've provided in your question: Ultras are for those who can at least finish a road marathon below 3:00/3:30 hours and they have an athletic/excellent Rest Heart Rate. You ...


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