Hot answers tagged

48

It's two different types of training. If all you were doing was jogging back and forth on the field, then your fitness would be just as sustainable as the other players around you. However, soccer is also punctuated with short burst, high intensity dashes that require a different type of training. This is similar to many other sports that mix two different ...


42

Your answer lies in your own question: I'm a bit of a couch potato with a sedentary job, who normally gets out of breath walking up a few flights of stairs. Recently I saw an article on TV about an 82 year old guy who has been hill running for decades, and still goes out every day. Stamina is something that can be trained like everything else. As @...


36

If you are really interested in the biology behind fitness then I'd suggest reading Dr. Jack Daniel's "Daniel's Running Formula". I'll paraphrase a few of the points you would read there. The goal is to get oxygen from the air to the muscles that need it. There are several systems involved in this process. Lung capacity Quite simply, how much air can ...


19

Getting a little more technical than JohnPs answer, what it comes down to is Aerobic vs Anaerobic conditioning. With Aerobic exercise you are keeping within your "oxygen budget", your body has enough oxygen available to supply the requirements of your muscles. When you are exercising at a constant intensity over a long interval you are in the aerobic phase, ...


16

No one can say how much you can train before you become overtrained. Firstly, there are too many factors involved, such as nutrition, weather conditions, your cardiovascular fitness, your fat percentage, your strength and explosiveness, the presence of any diseases (in particular autoimmune or inflammatory). Even if science knew how all those factors ...


16

Cardiovascular endurance and general conditioning. Simply put, the body will adapt to whatever your regular activities are. The fuel that you provide your body with also plays a part, but your conditioning is what makes the biggest difference. Muscle size is largely irrelevant to something like walking, but it can help if you were trying to sprint faster. ...


13

As you've discovered, the 10% rule isn't really applicable to someone who is completely new to running. It requires that you already have an established weekly running volume that you can tolerate, so it's really only for already established runners. As a beginner, you'd be better off starting with a dedicated beginner program, such as Couch to 5k, which can ...


12

Your spine and shoulders should be fine, the biggest risk is to the knees. In particular, running with any kind of weights (vest, ruck sack, etc.) puts much more stress on your knees. If you have bad running form, it's even more of a problem. Some quick points to think about: Make sure you have the right shoes for your total weight including the ruck ...


12

When you say breathe in, L, R, L, R; breathe out, L, R, L, R we like to call this 4:4. That is 4 steps on inhale, 4 steps on exhale. This study tries to analyze some of the breathing dynamics of humans during running. While it's pretty long and technical, it's been written about in more layman's terms here. The gist of it suggests that a 2:1 pattern ...


12

I'm curious to know what makes him (and the walkers I saw) "fit" - where does his stamina comes from? He was stick thin like me, so I guess muscles don't play a huge role in it. I can only assume it's down to heart and lung efficiency? Well, a quick look at that man's body may not have given you an accurate enough picture of his body's composition. He ...


11

What I find surprising, is that nobody seems to have mentioned your lack of sleep. 5-7 hours per night implies that you sometimes only get 5 hours of sleep. When you are working out and practice, your body will become stronger and sleep is quite vital for that process. You want to regenerate and also replenish your energy. As others have mentioned, you will ...


11

tl; dr - Masks are (mostly) gimmicks. They advertise as being able to raise VO2 max, by simulating high altitude training. This would in turn, raise EPO in the body, which then in turn stimulates red blood cell production, increasing oxygen transport. In reality, while they may increase the muscle tone of the breathing muscles (intercostals, etc), they do ...


10

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From there ...


10

Two main tips (note that I used to run in Wellington, NZ which is famed for both its hills and its wind). Firstly, a headwind is basically a hill you can't see - treat it that way. Techniques like small, quick steps to preserve momentum are most useful. Secondly, for a sufficiently strong wind you can draft off people. Tuck in behind someone in front and ...


10

I wouldn't worry about reducing my water intake during a run in hot weather. Just because your fellow runners don't drink anything doesn't mean it is a good idea for you (or them). Particularly under the conditions you are describing I would recommend you keep drinking water. It will help you perform better. As to the weight loss during the run: are you ...


10

5km or 7km mileage once a week is nowhere close to proper preparation for a marathon. You greatly increase risk of injury by running a marathon unprepared. Go see a doctor about your knee pain from the 20km race and forget about a marathon anytime soon. Many marathon plans have a long run of over 20km once a week for several months (and often with a run or ...


10

Both your friend and wife are wrong. Your friend seems to believe that fasted cardio leads to greater fat loss, but it simply doesn’t. Your body might attempt to use more fuel from fat during such a session, but it makes up for it later in the day, thereby rendering the attempt neutral (neither good or bad). Whether you exercise fasted or fed should be ...


9

You reduce body fat by being in a caloric deficit (burning more calories than you eat/drink). You build muscle by having a positive nitrogen balance (usually by having enough protein in your system). Balancing those two things can be tricky at times, but is definitely possible, especially for those new to muscle building. And yes, you’ll want to focus on ...


8

If you always run for a long distance along the beach in one direction, and the beach has quite a steep slope, then you could end up with problems. But generally you would be much more likely to run along the beach and then return, so you get both directions of slope. So I wouldn't worry. Sand running has so many other benefits: it uses up to 50% more ...


8

I've read that I should do warm-up before running and stretch after running. Is that correct? Yes. Do that. Warm up by running slowly and gradually increasing the pace, or with dynamic stretching movements like lunges, air squats, leg swings, running sideways or backwards, swinging the arms, and trunk rotations.


8

Take a look at the Galloway Run-Walk program. The harsh reality is that in a week, if you can only run 4k continuously right now, you will not be able to run 10k in a week. Your best bet if you really want to do it, is some sort of the above, where you run 1k, walk .5k, etc. Get used to the idea that you WILL be walking if you go ahead and do the 10k. If ...


8

If you're trying to lose weight my suggestion is to focus on your diet. Focus on eating less calories than you are expending and you will lose weight. Exercise is great for your health but will do little (relative to dieting) for your weight. Since you're just starting to exercise I suggest not trying to do too much too soon as it may result in injury and ...


8

Your question is pretty subjective, because nobody can tell you how much to run, or whether or not you'll even enjoy it as a regular activity. Same with diet and time of day, that's all personal and you'll have to determine it for yourself. The first item that I would stress (Other than your already recognized need to quit smoking), is that given your ...


7

First of all, you should switch to referring to different pace units. Try min/km or min/mile. In the running world speed in km/h is nearly meaningless, as you'll hardly encounter these units. Now, if you want to meet your goal, you should look for a training plan that will take you to your end goal over several weeks. Such training plan should have a ...


7

Yeah you should rarely, if ever, plan on adding more than 10% in either distance or speed per week as a general rule. More to the point of your question is whether you want to increase aerobic speed (how fast can you run 10k) or burst speed (how fast can you run < 1k). If the latter, then yes, bodyweight exercises like squats, one-legged squats, box ...


7

Hold a stopwatch in your hand, press it at the moment when you start sprinting, stop at the finish line, and then add 0.2-0.25s to simulate a reaction time as in a real start. If you are uncomfortable running with a stopwatch in your hand, then have someone else time you; start timing nce the first foot hits the ground, and at the end add about 0.6s. This ...


7

First off, it's a great question. Let me dissect a few things first: healthy eating guy Very few people really have this one dialed in. Maybe you do, but odds are you don't. There's a great website I've used called Body Recomposition and the writer is a pretty qualified guy who goes into nutrition. Speed and endurance are the two primary levers you can ...


7

If humans run, their breathing is not connected to their stride. Why don't you just breath the way it is comfortable with you? Especially when you just started to run, you shouldn't worry about anything like breathing patterns. Just try to find the "fun" in running!


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