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13

As you've discovered, the 10% rule isn't really applicable to someone who is completely new to running. It requires that you already have an established weekly running volume that you can tolerate, so it's really only for already established runners. As a beginner, you'd be better off starting with a dedicated beginner program, such as Couch to 5k, which can ...


5

The most likely reason is you pull up your foot when you run. This seems pretty common. Holding your foot up while running can exhaust your shins. It can also perpetuate heel striking which removes some of the shock absorption that your feet naturally provide. This in turn causes your shins to be even more tired. Tired shins may lead to shin splints if the ...


5

I don't believe that "stop sweating" is a good goal simply because, as it stands, it isn't a SMART goal. You can absolutely train to reduce fat, lower your resting heart rate, and get better and faster at conquering those stairs. However, even the most experienced athletes start sweating at some point. Sweating is your body's natural method of cooling ...


5

When you are starting a running program, the goal is to run the number of minutes that your body can tolerate and no more. If you over do it, you will join the ranks of the couch potatoes. Here is a plan that worked for me. Walk thirty minutes. Then run 1 minute. Then walk home. You continue running just one minute until one minute becomes easy for ...


4

VO2max is the amount of oxygen which your cells are able to convert into CO2. It doesn't say anything about the anaerobic threshold, for that you need to do a Conconi test (there are many variants of that test for all kinds of sports). High VO2max on a cellular level means you have a good lung and mitochondrial function, because these two factors contribute ...


4

First, there are two things that you note in your comments that are the most likely culprits. The race being hillier than your training area is the first indicator, as hill running is an entirely different beast than flat. It's much harder on the legs, and the calves especially, as they are the springs and shock absorbers for your legs. You're also doing ...


4

This might not be the answer to the question you've actually asked, but there's too much to put in a comment, so I'm going to risk the downvotes. Your question suggests that you believe the sweating is being caused by being overweight and thus heating up faster, causing your body to produce sweat as a cooling mechanism. While this may well be the case, ...


4

(In this answer I am only addressing muscle growth.) Muscle growth occurs on a per need basis within certain genetic and environmental parameters. Presenting a challenge to the muscles (typically by training) creates a stimulus for growth. Environmental factors (relative to the muscle tissue) such as stress and nutrition can promote or discourage additional ...


4

There is no “exact formula”, just estimations that generally seem to be more reliable than others. The following formula is one such example. While I don’t possess a peer reviewed study to pair with this formula, I personally trust the source. It comes from researcher Lyle McDonald’s “The Women’s Book Volume 1” (the formula is for males and females). The ...


3

There is some dispute over heart rate ranges and what is dangerous and what is okay. Personally, I think that anything ranging 180 is a good high-intensity/max effort heart rate. While I was in my running phase, I would often push up to 200ish during HIIT, but some may feel as though that is not safe. Assuming you are in your 20's, a heart rate between 170-...


3

I don't know anything about running; I haven't gone on a run in 5+ years. However, when inspecting the Calculate button from Runner's World, the site runs a function called runConversion(). A quick Ctrl+F for that in the source gives us script: <script language="JavaScript"> <!-- var metric; var VO2max; function ...


3

Life happens to all of us, so if you have to take a break, do it. You have little to lose by taking a week off from a running perspective. Just make sure you have a reasonable plan to resume and maintain your fitness. I've found that with running, consistency is key for progress. If you let one week off become 2 and then 3, it will be much harder to get ...


3

To address your question directly, you should not do any running or HIIT training until your Achilles tendinitis has healed fully. And that recovery should include a tentative and gradual return to your regular training volume and intensity. Loads equivalent to 2–3 times the body's weight are typically exerted on each leg during running, and the ‘high’ part ...


3

Try some wrist and or ankle weights - or even a weight vest depending on the climate. You aren't quite going to get the same effect as if you were moving faster but you are going to be making it more effort for a given speed.


2

I have high arches so I in a way know what you're going through.. I'd suggest going to a podiatrist and getting a custom made set of orthotics for your feet that you can slip in your running shoes. Feet are very unique, especially if you only have one flat foot, so relying on running shoes with an insert designed for you is going to be difficult. You just ...


2

The fact which I see in some workout plans is lack of focus on the muscles recovery, your one doesn't seem to be like that, but I believe running long distance without any break will results in increase in the time taken by muscles for recovery. If you're beginner and you're just starting your workout routine then don't try to overuse your muscles which will ...


2

From my experience, yes, you should be fine, but you're going to have to gauge it for yourself. Try for week 5 once you start back up, but keep in mind the week 4 goals, and switch to them if you find that week 5 is too challenging.


2

I am 73 years old. Have been running from high school. 29 marathons, including the last March LA marathon at the height of worldwide spread of Covid 19. Everyone is different. It could be that heartbeat is not the first cause for concern. As we know it is heart- longs- vascular and blood composition. I run 9-10 miles 6 days a week. My heartbeat goes above ...


2

Here is what has worked for me, to some extent. (Unfortunately, I cannot guarantee that this will work for you!) A physical therapist made me do single leg balance exercises. These exercises reinforce not only the hip adductors and abductors, but also the ankle and the muscle responsible for maintaining the arch under your foot. After a few months of doing ...


1

In order to answer your question, it is worth considering our understanding of the relationship between running economy and performance. Running performance is generally, but not always, associated with running economy. And whilst economy is a “complex, multifactorial concept,” two of its most important determinants are stride rate and stride length, whose ...


1

Distance running is all about pacing. You will run way slower if you gas yourself out too early and have to continuously slow down for the remaining of the run because you become increasingly tired. However, if you pace yourself early in the run, you will have enough energy to finish harder in the later portions of the run. With regards to inclines in ...


1

As an on-water rower, I am partial to rowing on an erg for my aerobic work. Assuming you get permission from a physical therapist, using an erg can supplement your training safely and efficiently. A proper rowing technique on the erg consists of “legs, back, arms” (“catch, drive, release”) in that order. This movement allows a total body workout. The ...


1

You could do some moving exercises like every 100m do 20 lunges, or high knees, or side step jumps keep walking on her pace like an active rest and repeat every 100m or every 2-3min. For example when you reach the 3min point you start skiping next to her for 20-30 sec then you can go to lunges for 20-30 seconds then you can go bunny style jumps for 20-30 sec ...


1

I think that is an excellent replacement. Dance can be an extremely effective form of cardio and has more benefits than running. Pros: Engages more muscles. Running is very stringent and to the point. It works the muscles that it needs and that's it. Dancing is fluid and ever changing. You'll use everything you have available to use in the process. Dancing ...


1

Without a professional diagnosis from a sports doctor, the precise cause of your shin splints can not be assessed. It should also be understood that the term shin splints is an umbrella term that covers a host of different conditions. However, many of those conditions have a common origin: poor running mechanics, and/or excessive training volume relative to ...


1

you should be considering a 5-day training for 5k under 20 mins. You should divide your training into 3 different running tempos. Tempo pace runs, Hiit Training (HIGH INTERVAL INTENSE TRAINING), Long Runs and fast Runs Tempo runs goes like 5-10 mins easy run building gradually to 3-5 minutes at 10K pace and 5-10 mins cool down. By this training, you ...


1

There are many ways to get there, as your investigations would suggest. And perhaps you will be pleased to learn that long-endurance work is not the most effective way to achieve high middle-distance performance. If you do not enjoy longer runs, there is no need to do them. Running speed is a function of stride length and stride rate. speed = stride length ...


1

Increasing your fitness is of course an option but it takes time. He is improving at a much higher rate than you can keep up with. To buy some time, can you hack the process a bit? Eg. can you trick him into taking a slightly longer, less efficient route eg. you going straight and him going in a zig-zag or around a corner (provided the area is safe for him ...


1

Typically the energy cycle your body uses looks like this if you're not resting while chasing the bike... ATP for first 10-20 seconds(this is the fastest you'll go, but it only goes for 10 to 20 seconds). Lactic-20 seconds to 70 seconds, sometimes more(moderately fast) Aerobic 90 seconds onward(very slow, think jogging speed). So over a couple minutes ...


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