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As an on-water rower, I am partial to rowing on an erg for my aerobic work. Assuming you get permission from a physical therapist, using an erg can supplement your training safely and efficiently. A proper rowing technique on the erg consists of “legs, back, arms” (“catch, drive, release”) in that order. This movement allows a total body workout. The ...


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To address your question directly, you should not do any running or HIIT training until your Achilles tendinitis has healed fully. And that recovery should include a tentative and gradual return to your regular training volume and intensity. Loads equivalent to 2–3 times the body's weight are typically exerted on each leg during running, and the ‘high’ part ...


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(In this answer I am only addressing muscle growth.) Muscle growth occurs on a per need basis within certain genetic and environmental parameters. Presenting a challenge to the muscles (typically by training) creates a stimulus for growth. Environmental factors (relative to the muscle tissue) such as stress and nutrition can promote or discourage additional ...


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I think that is an excellent replacement. Dance can be an extremely effective form of cardio and has more benefits than running. Pros: Engages more muscles. Running is very stringent and to the point. It works the muscles that it needs and that's it. Dancing is fluid and ever changing. You'll use everything you have available to use in the process. Dancing ...


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