Hot answers tagged

10

It's a deadlift, meaning the weight should be dead on the floor. Touch-and-go or otherwise bouncing around is not a deadlift. Personally, I relax my grip and reset on every rep. My hands don't come off the bar, but I open my fingers, ensuring that the weight is indeed dead on the floor. The extra second this adds to each set is negligible and the benefit ...


10

If you're goal is strength than in between sets you should rest. Catch your breath. Have some water. Nibble on some sort of calories. Load more weight on the bar. Then go again. Not sure why you're waiting 3 to 5 minutes between sets as a beginner unless its training with partner / partners that are going in that time. In which case help them load their ...


8

I found these two studies: (1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21659889 finds that circuit training (given the same volume, but less time), is indeed superior: same strength gains, more fat loss, and less gym time (2) https://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Fulltext/2014/09000/Effects_of_Traditional_vs__Alternating_Whole_Body.21.aspx studied men doing ...


7

Relax. Sit, lie down, listen to music, talk to friends. If you're outside, enjoy the sun. If you really want to do something related to the training, visualize the exercise you are doing. Where do you get the idea, that you have to fill your time? Actually, if you fill your time between sets with random stuff, you lose mental focus on your training.


7

The number of sets you do increases what we call the total volume of work being done. The more volume of work you do, the stronger signal your body gets that it needs to grow. If you do only one set, you aren't giving your body a very strong signal to grow. If the set is heavier than last time (even if you push it to failure), you give a slightly stronger ...


5

Anything that allows you to put in more overall fatigue inducing volume will be good. If you can do the first set at 12 reps, you have a few options: Do 3 sets at whatever you can get, and focus on building up even one more rep each time you do the exercise until you have the full set/reps Reduce weight for each set and use the last set to get as many as ...


5

I've always found something like working on antagonistic muscle groups, stretching tight muscle groups or just plain tidying up the gym a bit usually keeps me entertained.


4

You said at the gym, so I will start with gym etiquette. Don't reserve multiple stations, dumbbell, etc... So in the scenario, unless you use the same machine or dumbbells, the best way to organize your set is to use only one piece of equipment at a time and do whatever you want with it. Now that basic gym etiquette is out of the way. There are really two ...


4

First, let me correct your understanding of hypertrophy: You get bigger by more fatigue inducing reps (see this article for more info) There's nothing inspired or sacred about rep ranges or even set targets. They are just tools (see this article for more info) Second, you need to understand the concept of fatigue. The articles I linked to above are ...


4

John's answer is correct - all in all, it's hypertrophy (TUT) vs strength (rest). I just wanna add that it's a matter of how long the stoppage lasts, and not the reason that made you stop (as long as you're remaining in the starting position). e.g. resetting your grip is equal to stopping for a breath. There is no definition for how long the bar should lay ...


3

Yes, depending on your goals Resetting your grip likely takes a bit of time, perhaps a few seconds, perhaps 10 or more. During this time, your hamstrings are (mostly) resting. This changes the results of the exercise somewhat. From a hypertrophy standpoint, the more you are 'resting' between reps, the more you're losing a bit of Time-Under-Tension, which ...


3

so 108 sun salutations.One Suryanamaskar contains 12 asanas that complete one cycle, so one cycle per each leg (Right & left) complete one round. So 54 sets of this round will give 108 Sun salutations. Good luck.


2

(This answer is according to your goal, hypertrophy) Reaching failure shouldn't be your goal. According to a few articles I read (a very good one can be found here), training constantly to failure may hinder your results. I have two main rules in this topic (both also appear in the article): Set weight that lets you reach failure only on the last set of ...


2

The way I do it is not the hatha sin salutation that is all one but the Right and then only the Left. I do the Ashtanga vinyasa suryanamaskara A, which is only one. And I do the 108. I have heard some people do 54 suryanamaskara A and 54 suryanamaskara B.


2

You would do 3 of the lower range at a heavier rep range, then progress rep range upwards lowering the weight of muscle exhaustion is the goal. Alternatively, depending on the hardness or the training you could also go 1 8-10 heavy, lighten load go to the next rep range, lighten load go to the next rep range with pauses and that would be the set. The second ...


2

Volume is an independent variable that can be used to overcome the body's acclimatization to training stimulus. This is particularly useful when the exercise is done for high reps, such as with simple bodyweight work like chin-ups, pull-ups, push-ups, and dips. (More complex bodyweight work would mean gymnastic variations to increase the difficulty of the ...


2

They almost certainly aren't going to failure on each set, and probably not even on any sets. The exact details will vary from program to program, but someone doing 4 sets of 8 would typically use a weight that they could actually lift for 10-12 reps if they were to attempt a single, maximal set. There are a few ways they could achieve this: Not ...


1

A few years ago my brother and I decided to do 300 push-ups for time competition. I used this app (roughly) and it’s program to train. It tests your current max, and adjusts the plan accordingly. Runtastic Push-Ups PRO Trainer by runtastic https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/runtastic-push-ups-pro-trainer/id570180361?mt=8


1

I would agree a fit person should be able to relatively easily do 4-5 sets of 8-12 jumping lunges with a short rest period. Without some video of you doing the exercise we cannot tell if you are doing It wrong, but it sounds like you are just weak. Rep counting is whatever you make of it, in my view (and CrossFit's view) every time you move your legs it ...


1

I bring a book (or read one on a tablet), and walk laps while waiting. It's low-impact, but it's exercise, keeping me warmed up, and it gives me a chance to finish one of the half-dozen books I'm in the process of reading.


1

With respect to the example that you provided, the additional sets might benefit you in subsequent attempts at longer sets (for example, 10/8/7), if you recover and adapt from the additional sets. The additional sets probably will increase your recovery demand, and the additional fatigue may negatively impact other exercises that require those muscles.


1

If you want to maximize mechanical and metabolic stimuli you want to be consequential in the exercise order. The best option is to target for first the muscle group you want to prioritaze. There's a misconception in the bodybuilding/online community that you can isolate a certain muscle group. That is actually not realistic. There will be always more than ...


1

I'd say try different sets and see what works the best for you. Everyone is different and different routines leads to different results in different people. Try out and check the results. The one that you find effective, stick to it.


1

This would be what some call a "giant" super set. Usually a super set is 2 moves, but I have done giant super sets up to 4 moves (usually 1 or 2 of the moves being body weight moves though). I use supersets almost exclusively when I workout. You can do antagonist muscles as mentioned before, but you can also do the same muscle group. For arms I always ...


1

From the research that I have read, the length of your break has no influence on hypertrophy. The best indicator of hypertrophy is either volume, as in tonnage (sets times reps times weight) increasing over time, or more recently the number of "hard" sets per workout, meaning the number of sets which leave you close to technical failure (not at failure or ...


1

1 set = 2 rounds 54 sets = 108 rounds


1

It's quite common to have too short rest periods between sets, so increasing it will lower the effect you are noticing. The effect won't vanish however, I would suggest that you set your goal like 10 reps, 8 reps, 6 reps (3 sets), that way, you will challenge yourself in every set instead of just the last ones. In exercises where you are able to decrease ...


1

Do I need to change the routine? No. So long you are able to progress in weights / reps / sets, you do not need to change your routine. With that said, this is called progressive overload. So long you are progressing, your workout is pretty much effective for you. You are doing pretty well except for your 3rd week. So what you could do is continue doing 70 ...


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