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4

I experience a lot of various problems with distance walking. As far as I have seen, fancy shoes or insoles do not make much of a difference. In some cases, this aid can help, but in some cases, it just reduces the symptoms of deeper issues. The first thing to check - have you build the walking volume gradually? Maybe you just need more time to adapt via ...


4

This happens with my shoes too. I believe that this has to do with my habit of lifting and placing my feet rather than any imperfection in my body balance or my 'gait' ... I know, I walk in an under-pronation gait. As a result the outer heel of all my shoes always wear down much faster than any other part of the sole. What is under-pronation/...


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I mostly agree with Marten's answer in that feet have changed with the widespread adoption of constant wearing of shoes, but I disagree with some of his other facts such as his assertion that there are no successful barefoot or minimalist runners (never mind that, at high levels of competition, arguing about minimalist equipment is kind of silly since they'...


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You might want to read this page on how to select a running shoe. Sounds like you underpronate your walk. That is you walk slightly outward on your foot with each step. From the chart on the page you might want to try a neutral type of shoe. Underpronation/Supination: The two terms "underpronation" and "supination" can be used interchangeably to ...


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Higher heel elevation means that you can push your knees further forward before reaching the limit of your ankle flexibility. Knees further forward make for a more upright squat. If you're practicing Olympic weightlifting, then you'll generally want your squats to be more upright, since you need to catch the clean with an upright torso. Olympic lifters also ...


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For me, what I look for is practicality. Do they have good grip, are they comfortable and how much weight the shoe has. The grip for those sorts of sports 100% has to be good, otherwise you're going to be at a disadvantage. How comfortable the shoes are is pretty self explanatory, you don't want to be doing sports with an uncomfortable feeling from your ...


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To prevent blisters and the feeling that your feet are damaged after few hours of walking, get some shoes with thick and hard to bend soles. More like light hiking shoes. Don't think to get some soft and "comfortable" but something robust. I'm speaking from the experience. Blisters can occur do to shoes being too tight or too loose - which makes the feet ...


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My guess is they don't quite fit. You might need a slightly bigger shoe, most places recommend a half size larger as your feet tend to swell(which is probably why it hurt after 20 mins). The other general recommendation is to have about a thumbs width between big toe and top of shoe (NYTimes, 2010). If your store has a generous return policy(as you ...


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Its great that you love running up the stairs. You are correct that coming down has a slight negative effect on the legs specifically the knees. Running up for that matter, has very less impact on your joints, unless you stomp. The majority of the pressure is on your calf muscles, which is obviously a good thing... Over time your muscles grow stronger. ...


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First, feet do not look the same anymore, the use of shoes from early on shapes our feet, not only in their performance but also in their shape. This is a picture of feet used to shoes and feet that has not been adapted to shoes: So basically, you can not expect that since we didn't use shoes, it's now safe (or better) to run barefeet. If you're flatfooted ...


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Yes. Training barefoot is actually one of the best ways to train, atleast if you're doing stuff like deadlifting or sqautting. The thing is, most gyms do not allow you to train barefoot for obvious hygiene/safety reasons, therefor a lot of people resort to shoes with very flat, sturdy soles. I personally just workout with my shoes off (on my socks) and my ...


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So at the end of the day there is not a ton you can do. It's all about static friction and no matter what if you add water as a layer between the surface you're running on and your shoes the coefficient of static friction will be decreased. What you can do is look into trail running shoes. They are intentionally built with more support and traction for ...


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Alright so what I use when I do parkour or free running are adidas classic samba shoes. They are very soft and after some wearing form to your foot in a good manner. I really like them as they have enough support for my arch yet enough grip for vaults and other moves. I have had 2 pairs and neither have ever ripped, i just out grew them. I would highly ...


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I think the main difference is running shoes are built to handle and absorb, short- and long-term, the much greater impact that comes with running. While using "walking" shoes for serious running is probably not recommended, the reverse would not be true. Can running shoes be used as walking shoes? The short answer: yes. Running shoes and walking ...


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I have almost the same problem of the flat foot (not severe problem but bad enough). As I am in physiotherapy and performance training business I ‘ve asked many people (experts in their field) what I should do. From sports physios and orthopaedic doctors to CrossFit trainers to professional weightlifters. After trying different approaches, this is what I ...


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Making sure that the area is clean and clear of any small objects that may cause you to hurt your feet or cause cuts would be important. Likewise making sure that furniture it out of the way and that the surface has enough purchase for your feet. For example, carpet would provide a much better surface than hardwood (you mentioned carpeting, so that’s good) ...


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As someone who has walked five marathons, I have the following advice: Go to a running store where the staff will actually watch you walk and observe whether you are pronating, etc. You should have a shoe that is about 1/2 size bigger than what you normally wear for everyday use because your feet swell during distance walking. You are supposed to have a ...


1

Is your experience growing up that you went barefoot a lot? I did, as most of my youth was spent at swimming pools. My doctor once commented that I had "luau feet" - a wider spread that he attributed to being barefoot a lot over the years. The shoes are not designed to be narrow and constricting, they are narrow because most people, at least in the USA, ...


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I have a torn ACL and after wearing the Adidas Bostons, my knees have felt tons better. Note that I believe that I own 2013 versions. I've also worn Adidas's supernovas and they were quite comfortable (but a bit heavier, not by much)


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Haglund's deformity is mainly genetic and depends on your type of foot. As your brother has already had this, I suspect you might have the same type of foot and therefore have a higher risk of getting the deformity that others. Also, it's When most people first notice Haglund’s deformity, it is because the skin, bursa and other soft tissues at the ...


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Extra wear on the heel may suggest overstriding and the edge wear suggests that you may not be rotating your foot enough. Although, are these your running shoes? They look more like leather business casual. If you have a picture of the front, it would let us know whether the wear on the heels is simply emblematic of general wear, although the wears on the ...


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There are two options for those who have wide feet when it comes to oly lifting shoes. Nike Romaleos 2 (interchangeable soles in the shoes which is a big +) and Adidas power perfect 2. I find adidas power perfect 2 pretty affordable and had to rip the glued soles out of the shoes. Orthotics fit perfectly and my toes can move. For the material of the ...


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Let me try to have a stab at answering your questions. Nike makes a pretty good range of shoes and I'm sure you can find one that will suit. Look for LunarGlide that are fairly light, not tons of cushioning, but more than Saucony Kinvara. They also use the Flywire design (knitted top). In also supernator and find them great for both short and longer ...


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Like another answer has already mentioned, SmartWool cycling or running socks are great and will help your feet to "breathe" while exercising. Another sock brand is Lululemon. They have very high quality socks and I have personally used both their "Lululemon No Show Ultimate Run Sock" and the "Ultimate Low-Pro Run Sock". They can easily run you about $20 a ...


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Sorry to reply to an old thread here. I couldn't comment directly to Pacerier, but I think 4-5 hole shoes are generally for longer distance and easier turn over. 7-8 hole are for sprinters that need more traction.


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As it is said, prevention is better than cure, but once it happens, one can do nothing about it, other than to continue with his/her daily routine. I also think it's better to give the blister some open space rather than covering it up with band-aids, bandages, etc. If it has occurred due to football just keep on with your game; it will hurt and burn a bit ...


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