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The shoulder is an amazingly complex joint that allows for a very wide range of motion. The point of the rotator cuff is to keep the ball joint in the middle of the shoulder girdle. It is a stabilizing muscle, not a primary mover. I think it's a big mistake to treat rehab exercises like you would strength exercises. When a physical therapist prescribes ...


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What I learned from having shoulder impingement in both of my shoulders at the same time: 1) Face Pulls: Probably one of the best things you can do for your shoulders. A great exercise for strengthening both your rear delts and the external rotators of your shoulder. It also works very well for rehabbing and prehabbing your shoulders. 2) Rows: Add some ...


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I'm not a doctor and can't diagnose medical stuff, go see an actual doctor / physio, etc, etc, etc. Consider that a disclaimer, this is all my opinion. Have a look at your grip width. If you're trying to use a really narrow grip to keep upper back tightness, then it'll place a lot of stress on the shoulder structure you're talking about. If you have a ...


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It is a very bad idea. The main role of the rotator cuff muscles is positioning the center of the Humerus head in the precise place during each movement (avoiding the dreaded humeral head migration), so that the action of the "big" muscles (pecs, lat, deltoid heads) does not result in soft tissue impingement and the rotation takes place smoothly. By ...


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I've done this, and I found that it may have helped improve my overhead press by five or ten pounds over the course of a month. It also stressed my shoulder joint (through both overuse and under-warmup) to the point where I had to take time off training.


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I think that you need to consider whether or not the rotator cuff exercises before lifting are a light warm-up or performed to the point of fatigue. If the exercises fatigue the rotator cuff muscles, then as @Mephisto cautions, the humeral head will migrate superiorly especially with overhead exercise such as the shoulder press. This is an unwanted ...


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I myself have become very interested in this area, based on my research I have discovered that Massachusetts General Hospital actually DO recommend doing warm up exercises under the heading Prevention of Injuries in Weight Training The source can be found here: http://www.massgeneral.org/ortho/services/sports/rehab/Strength%20Training%20for%20the%...


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I'll try to address the paragraphs individually, as there is quite a bit to cover. Both shoulders do it, but the right one does it much more readily and frequently. This is normal. We're not as symmetric as we'd like to be, so we tend to have small differences between the two sides. I wouldn't say there is true pain when it pops, but there is a small ...


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Go to therapist / doctor. If you don't want - try tests like this one - to identify your problem. Then read/watch/find out how to fix the problem. Usually doctor is much better option - like that two from video. In case of problems I would choose them, instead of trying fix something for myself.


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Isolation training for your RO Cuff (in a non-rehab setting) is inefficient and unnecessary as it's already activated during more complex exercises. You're body moves as a unit and muscles never act in isolation. Your rotator-cuff should not be trained "alone" as it a critical dynamic stabilizer for the most unstable joint in your body, your shoulder. ...


2

I think that "warming up rotator cuff muscle before weight lifting and workout" is good.But if you work out a lot rotator cuffs then you are exhausting your rotator cuffs and rotator cuffs can't stabilize your shoulder.


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I had a similar issue with lat pull downs. My right bicep was stronger than my left, so my left lat did the heavy lifting paired with my right arm. I'm fairly new to gym but I've been training with pull ups and push ups for years. I tried doing some pullups about a month ago, and noticed how much stronger my left lat was than my right. I'm still on the way ...


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Shoulder Kinematics During Abduction There is so much going on at the shoulder during any type of overhead and rotational movement. The supraspinatus is a smaller GH stabilizing muscle that never works in isolation - so this may be one of many muscles you are feeling. The contracting muscles are dynamic related. With a line of pull (or force vector) ...


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You need to focus on warming up your shoulders before any workout. For this grab a 5 lbs dumbbell (or lighter) vertically, maintain an angle of 90° between biceps and forearms and perform movements for Right hand towards RHS & for left hand towards LHS, perform 10-15 reps. Then raise your hands to shoulder height(maintaining 90° b/w biceps & forearms)...


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You need to figure this out for yourself by looking at a picture. Each individual part of the shoulder joint is too small for that red dot to give any indication of what/where the problem is.


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I had similar problems, my physiotherapist instructed me to do my (light) rehab exercises 15*2 reps, each day.


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The rotator cuff is collection of four tendons and muscles. Most people don't target them until they've had some form of injury to the area. They are typically exercised using bands, towels, cables, stretches, and very light weights. If you've had previous problems with your rotator cuff, it's not a bad idea to warm up first. Make sure to perform any ...


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If I understand your question, you could look at it a little more basically and ask: Is someone who's doing a bit more physical work during the day going to have better strength than someone who doesn't? If you hopped up from your desk and tried to 1RM a deadlift after sitting on your butt for a couple of hours, that would probably be a bad idea. But ...


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What volume would I have to work with in order to see any positive benefit? If you are going to incorporate an exercise into a frequent daily routine then you need it to be very low volume, otherwise you will over stress your body without giving it time to recover and build muscle. This concept of low-volume exercises throughout the day is called "greasing ...


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You honestly don't look that inflexible to me. It was a long video but I don't think I saw any front squats in the rack position which is really the weight lifting move that requires the most flexibility. I've heard of folks getting shoulder injuries actually from them being too loose (i.e. too much stretching), but I don't have any data to back that up. ...


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Rotator cuff weaknesses do not translate into fatigue and low reaction speed. You might be confusing terms. If you feel your arms react slowly and your shoulders feel fatigued too early, you are talking about the big muscles that raise and move your arms: rear, lateral and front deltoid in your shoulders, lats and other back muscles and so on. Those big ...


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