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"On the other hand there is this "trend"(?) started by the surgeon John Kirsch who argues that hanging completely relaxed for some time every day will fix most shoulder problems by moving your acromion into a better position over time." Never heard of this doctor but when I had shoulder pain from work it was instinctive...automatic for me ...


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The rotator cuff muscles are important in shoulder movements and in maintaining glenohumeral joint (shoulder joint) stability.[4] These muscles arise from the scapula and connect to the head of the humerus, forming a cuff at the shoulder joint. They hold the head of the humerus in the small and shallow glenoid fossa of the scapula. "Am I right in ...


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I'd question the claim that side-planks are good for shoulder stability. There are some stability demands of the side-plank, but they're pretty minimal and unlikely to really put a significant training stimulus on the shoulder muscles. The only point of instability in a side plank is tilting forwards (into a prone position) or backwards (into a supine ...


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The main difference is one of intent. Hanging with relaxed shoulders, the intent should be that of stretching, allowing your body to relax into the stretched position. Hanging with active shoulders, the intent should be strengthening the muscles of the shoulder, which will help with injury prevention. When you're doing fingerboard work, you're training your ...


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