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8

Yes there are muscles between your ribs. They're called the intercostal muscles, though "soreness in ribs" might also be caused by soreness in your pectoralis minor (which connects to the front of the rib cage) or your serratus anterior (which connect your back to the side of your rib cage). A good hint that it's muscle soreness instead of connective tissue ...


7

The problem is not that your core muscles are not strong enough to lift your chest up. It looks like you are facing another (bigger problem) : physics. Actually, it is not weird not to be able to do what you are trying to do. In the position that you are in (supposedly with your feet close to your butt), your center of gravity is located above the waist. So ...


7

As a preface, although your concerns about the validity of the field of chiropractic are entirely warranted, it appears that Dr. Stuart M. McGill is indeed qualified. He was a former professor at the University of Waterloo, holding Ph.D., Masters, and Bachelors degrees in Kinesiology (Biomechanics), Kinanthropology (Biomechanics), and Physical and Health ...


6

The rectus abdominus works to curl the torso, and bring the lower part of the ribcage forward and down. It is one muscle, and as such, any exercise that curls the body works the entire muscle. The "upper and lower" abdominal belief is pretty much a myth. Whether you curl down towards your legs or up towards your head, the entire muscle is contracting. The ...


6

Consider for a moment that a major job for your abs is not to pull your chest to your knees (crunch and sit up style), but to remain erect and not collapse like when doing a front squat: Crunches and sit ups don't have a large isometric component, as where something like front squats, deadlifts, and planks do. Most of what we want our backs to do in daily ...


5

That looks incredibly uncomfortable. However, there are probably two ways to use this. One is for decline situps, where your knees would go over the bar at the end of the bench and your feet hook under the bar sticking out. Lay back until head touches then elevate towards feet. The second is to lay the opposite way, and grab the bar at the end of the bench ...


4

Well, one thing you should note is that 64% is the standard percentage of the upper-body compared to the entire body. On the other hand, a sit-up is pretty hard to measure. A body-builder who has huge upper-body muscles compared to a long-distance runner who is fairly skinny and has an even distribution of muscles (maybe more in the lower-body portion) are ...


4

Trying to calculate in advance how much weight an untrained individual should be able to use in their first session is an exercise in futility. First session in the gym, just start with a weight that would be trivially easy to lift for your target number of repetitions. That's your first warm-up set. Then increase the weight set by set until it gets to the ...


4

There is generally no consensus about anything. We all have different bodies. We all react differently to different stimuli. That said, 60 reps of anything is a stamina exercise, and not a strength exercise. And your friends who did hundreds, weren't developing strength. They were developing further the ability to do hundreds of reps. The best advice we ...


3

What should I be focusing on when doing a situp? The primary thing you should focus on is contracting (tightening) your abdominals as you bring your chest to your knees. Are there ways to reduce strain on muscle groups that should not be getting strained? I never do the traditional sit-up anymore because it puts so much strain on other areas, and there ...


3

Crunches overdevelop the top 4 ( or crown ) of your 8 pack abdominal muscles, unless you are compensating by doing a lot of lower abdominal exercises. A sit up is also not the best abdominal exercise for core strength. Try V-Ups, Jack knifes, Leg Raises, Weighted Planks, Front Levers, etc.


3

The main differences I've seen between the two: Crunches: Shorter range of motion, abs are more isolated, little to no lower back movement. Sit-ups: Longer range of motion (more time under tension), involves hip flexors, may involve rounding of the lumbar spine, easier to load with resistance. Of the two, I feel crunches are a better option as there may ...


3

More muscles are used in a sit up but crunches seem to focus on the abdominal muscles more. For myself I can do 2-3 times as many crunches, and always do some crunches after sit ups to continue working some of the muscles. The main group of muscles neglected in crunches seem to be the back and legs. In the military you get 2 minutes to do as many as ...


2

Based upon your description, it sounds as though you have most likely just bruised the tissue covering the spinous processes of the vertebral column. This is easy to do if you are performing your sit-ups on a hard floor, as there is no muscle and little fat to cushion your mid-line as you set yourself down between each repetition. If it is just bruising, ...


2

The main function of the rectus abdominus is to curl the torso forward. Contrary to popular belief and method, bending at the hips works hip/leg flexors, with minimal involvement to the abdominal muscle. For growth, you need to stress the muscle as you would any other, with progressive overload in the hypertrophy range for sets/reps. To start, you can do ...


2

It is possible that you're using your leg muscles to push yourself up in the sit-ups. I know I had that problem at one point. If you're feeling tension in your legs while doing the sit-ups, there's a decent change you're engaging the legs. If so, doing them with your feet held will have more limited use since you're diluting your effort with your legs. That ...


2

The key difference between a floor and a bench sit-up is that the latter affords us the ability to alter our load profile. In a sit-up from the floor, the greatest load on the hip flexors and abdominals occurs at the very bottom of the lift. The load decreases progressively thereafter, with the centre-of-upper-body-mass drawing closer to the fulcrum, and the ...


1

Learn how to bat hang... It's basically when you grip a pull up bar with your feet. Hold on the bar with your feet and then do sit ups upside down, alternatively you can grip the bar with your thighs by curling the leg over the bar and then squishing it really tight. Another option is to make a roman-chair. Basically sit on a chair and find a way to block ...


1

Since building a sixpack will require some muscle growth, I'd argue that neither are effective. You'll be at a point where you can do dozens of sit-ups very quickly, which might be fine for the endurance of your abs, but won't help growth very much. Same for holding 3 mins of planck. Fine, but not very helpful on your way towards a sixpack. While not ...


1

Don't get discouraged, repetition is the only way to improve. Try putting your hands behind your head and with your legs bent at a 90-degree angle and your feet firmly on the ground as you begin to go up try pushing down with on your heels. Alternative exercises such as planks or hip lifts could be beneficial for improving your core strength.


1

Try hooking your feet under something you can pull against. I did situps for years like this, in the end I could do situps without this counterbalance.


1

Situps are not the only exercise that can strengthen your core. Other exercises include planks, bicycles, crunches, and inverse crunches. I am not sure your fitness levels but each of these would help you get to a place where you could do a full sit-up. Yoga is also a good way to improve core strength and flexibility as most of the forms work the core. It ...


1

Buy some resistance bands. Loop it around your back and anchor to a wall/pole/whatever, and use the rubber band to propel you up.


1

It is because when you've used the machine at the gym you haven't had to activate the hip flexors, that is the muscle group connecting your legs to pelvis and abdomen. These are activated when you do a classic crunch on the ground and move your upper body all the way up towards your knees. Really the only way to do crunches without anchoring your feet is ...


1

You shouldn't do sit-ups at all. Sit-up are mainly done by your hip flexors, but these are strong enough most of the time. Do really target your abs, you should do crunches. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crunch_(exercise). Every time you flex your hip (angle between legs and hip), it's done by your hip flexors. Every time you flex your spine, it's done by ...


1

Well to get away from vague statements, what do you mean by harmful? Are you asking if situps are inherently bad to your health? If situps are harmful if you have injuries to the areas involved in a situp? My personal reasoning is that situps are not harmful. Claims to compressive loading don't make sense as you do them supine - you are under a constant ...


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