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6

I've checked the book I recommended in the comment. It is written by a PhD Robert K. Cooper and is entitled "Flip the switch". A simplification of what you could read there is as follows: We have limited storage space for excess protein, and the amino acids from them remain in the bloodstream for only about 4 hours. thats a good reason to include proteins ...


6

I'm sorry you are having poor sleep! There are a few things you can try that have worked for me (I also have chronic neck issues). Rolling a towel and placing it under your neck while lying on your back, and rolling a few towels to place underneath your knees. If you feel uncomfortable on your back because your lower spine feels a pull, the rolled up ...


6

This isn't an uncommon problem. Doing a short burst, high intensity workout can actually help keep you awake if you're trying to cram for an exam (for example). In your situation though, this side-effect is not desirable. Various things can be going on in your body after exercising that can keep your body from properly relaxing so that you can get the ...


6

An optimized sleep schedule is one which is a) the right length and b) starts and ends at the same time every day. Following is an explanation of both requirements and why they are important. Having a sleep schedule which is the right length Your sleep cycle can be roughly broken down into two parts, deep sleep and REM (rapid eye movement). It is during ...


6

I've had this before and although I'm a little cautious to throw the overtraining flag, research suggests there is correlation if not causation: These individuals became acutely overtrained as indicated by significant reductions in running performance from day 1 to day 11. The overtrained state was accompanied by severe fatigue, immune system ...


6

In my honest opinion you're already doing a lot of strenuous work which can cause fatigue as it is. Being a Dad obviously can't be easy work either, people generally recommend 8+ hours of sleep a day to enable recovery for your muscles to grow and since you're already doing a lot of exercise and lacking the sleep I would probably say it would not be feasible ...


5

In general, in order to maximize the quality of your weight training, your body should be as fresh and rested as possible. Therefore, you should either run immediately afterwards, or run on your rest days between your strength training. I've tried running in the morning and weight training in the afternoon, but it didn't work out for me, because I never felt ...


5

To quote the National Institute of Health: When healthy adults are given unlimited opportunity to sleep, they sleep on average between 8 and 8.5 hours a night. But sleep needs vary from person to person. Some people appear to need only about 7 hours to avoid problem sleepiness, whereas others need 9 or more hours of sleep. So, you may in fact by ...


5

I train for cycling time trials, ranging from 10 mile sprints to 12 hr endurance races. I train on Heart rate and power meters, so I know accurately when I've upped my endurance/fitness. I find if I have a training session, whether that be Turbo or out on the road and I've exceeded a burn of 3000 cals then that following night (without fail) I will suffer ...


5

Yes, there is a difference. For example, in the this lecture, sleep scientist Jessica Payne from University of Notre Dame talks about the importance of sleep in the context of fitness (not only fitness). Sleep is different from just inactivity, see for example the wikipedia article on the topic. In contrast to rest, during sleep the body grows and ...


5

This is a terrible idea. Being sleep-deprived makes that workout suffer, particularly for high-intensity workouts. More importantly, sleep debt is not "paid back" with a single night of copious sleep. Not getting enough sleep can take a few days to fix.


4

Night sweats can be related to an increase in exercise intensity due to the affect of exercise on the endocrine glands and hormone secreations. In general, excessive sweating at night is caused by hormones. That is why menopausal women are prone to night sweats. However, there are also several other causes, including medical or medication causes so night ...


4

It's possible, although a 5lb weight gain in two weeks suggests that there might be other changes that are occurring that you are not considering. Lack of sleep contributes to higher stress, usually caused by higher levels of cortisol in the system. Cortisol increases your appetite, and can change how your metabolism reacts, causing you to "hoard" the ...


4

I don't know what your body fat percentage is but you need to have around 10% to have visible abs, mine is lower and I still barely see them. One way to make your abs more visible is to do actual weighted ab exercises. Most fit people can do well over 20 situps which is no longer stimulating hypertrophy, if you try situps with some weight you may see ...


4

This is normal to need more sleep. If you were swimming 20-30 minutes yes you will feel energised, but if you are swimming for an hour it's pretty normal to feel tired and need more sleep. Maybe you should mix things up a bit. Some days a shorter swim, some days longer. I'm sure there are some swimmers out there. That could suggest some interval ...


4

I can only speak from experience as someone else that usually works out a few hours before going to sleep. I often have the same problem, particularly after cardio due to the elevated heartrate, but sometimes after weightlifting too. The best thing you can do for yourself is to establish a night-routine that will help relax your body between a workout and ...


4

100%, I've been training for about 5 years now and there was one spell were due to work I was living off about 4-6 hours sleep a night for a month. I still exercised and dieting like i normally would but I actually loss muscle strength. Sleep is were all the hard work pays off, its the chance for your body grow and recover. Without the proper recovery you ...


4

You’d be amazed how much more productive and energized you feel after starting a strength and cardio training regimen. As you’re just starting out, developing consistency is far more important than what exercises you do. Discipline is everything. Defined as: Control gained by enforcing obedience or order: orderly or prescribed conduct or pattern of ...


4

As @CuriousIndeed mentioned, bodyweight exercises might be what you're looking for. Sleep is extremely important and I would recommend you get those power naps in. Spend those free time periods napping. Make sure your diet is on point and start incorporating those body weight routines while taking care of your daughter. She's lying in the crib, pop out a ...


4

I would try to rephrase your question as: I have bad sleeping schedule, however I'd like to add some muscle mass, but feel like gym membership will be wasted money. There is no way for us to know how your body will respond to training, you can only find out by trying. The fact that you "walk around 5-8 miles per day and consistently lift heavy objects" ...


3

Let me start off by saying that sleep is more important than working out, and here is the why, the main thing we try to accomplish while sleeping is "recovery" and the most important thing you need after working out is "recovery" and obviously you can see that if the main thing you need is recovery but you are not getting recovery time the workouts wont do ...


3

In general, the people who live the longest, sleep six to seven hours per night see Wikipedia: Sleep. So how does sleep and exercise relate to each other? Ligtht physcial exercise seems to favor sleep, e.g. see Effects of light physcial exercise on sleep regulation in rats. Heavy exercise and sleep deprivation creates an energy deficit, see this article ...


3

This depends a bit on the kind of exercises you do. There is a little debate in the fitness community if exercising in the morning with or without prior breakfast has an effect on fat loss. The theory is that your glycogen levels are low and your body has to burn fat to compensate. However as far as I recall research could not show that this is true. So ...


3

There is a difference between what is best for your health and what is realistic to implement in your life. The amount of sleep you need is different for everyone. Ideally, it's best to go to bed when the sun sets (or little after) and wake up every day without an alarm clock. I did this for a month every day and felt amazing, but it does impact your social ...


3

Well, it really depends on your office environment. For example, do you have your own office where no one can see you or are you in a cubicle? If your office culture is ok with you taking a nap, then simply put your head down on your desk. According to research, the nap should only be 15-20 mins between 1-3pm. If naps are frowned upon, then you can take ...


3

Well you aren't getting in shape by sleeping. Yes sleep is crucial to a good fitness routine but sleep is not making you more fit. Also 5-6 hours isn't terrible if it is just one night. If you have 4 workouts you do a week and you will move this workout to another day I say do that. If you will simply skip the workout, I wouldn't. Since you are more apt ...


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