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Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is not something you should use to gauge the efficiency of your workouts. It's mostly only experienced when your body gets put through something it's not used to. In essence, it's not anything you need to aim for. But in terms of getting variety into your workout regimen, it's a good indicator of "hey, this is new", ...


10

Stick to what is working for you. If you cannot run everyday, but OK with running on alternate days, do that. Unless there is some deadline due to competition, there is no point in over-stressing yourself. I am not a big runner myself and used be even worse, but I learned that persistence leads to good results and persistence is not possible if you do not ...


6

You started squatting more so you would get better at squatting. It sounds like your plan is working. You're better at squatting since you squat more. One part of being better at squatting is that squatting doesn't make you sore. Two concerns: one, it's not clear what you mean by "attempted squat 5 failed attempts", which sounds a bit reckless. Two, if your ...


5

It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), and is a natural consequence of changing either intensity or volume on anything you are doing. It's temporary, and once you get used to the new regular workload you won't get it anymore. It has no effect on your ability to train or carry any risk of injury. It's simply uncomfortable. A little information ...


5

To build on Eric's comment; the best advice is to follow a workout program that is tried and true. If you're trying to make your own program, and you find yourself having to ask this question, you should probably not be making your own program in the first place. To make your own program is something you do when you know your body very well, and you know ...


3

For the first part of your question, 500m in 30 minutes is slightly faster than floating with the waves, unfortunately. Top high school boys will be near 4:30 (4 minutes 30 seconds) for that distance, girls will be 15ish seconds slower. However, this combined with the leg pain in the kicking portion tells me that most likely you have a form problem, that ...


3

Muscle soreness is irrelevant to muscle growth. It's just a sign you haven't exercised these particular muscles recently. Provided you've had enough rest and good calorie intake in the last few days, you are more than good to go and do the exercises. It's not a good idea to do it if you've done any intense leg exercise in the last ~72 hours. Spend 5 min ...


3

Soreness (DOMS: Delayed onset muscle soreness) is not a good indicator of work effort. Check out this answer for more info, specifically on the types of things that cause DOMS and the things that don't. If you want sore triceps, do heavy skull crushers. If you want sore hamstrings, (carefully) do good mornings. They make you sore because they are eccentric: ...


3

If you're not seeing muscle increase in your arms, it's either you're not working the muscles hard enough or you're using bad forms. You don't necessarily need to change your routine. First, check your forms and ensure that you're lifting the weights appropriately. That might require you watching a lot of videos and practise in order to use the proper ...


2

If you're talking about Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), there's this question and answer that might help you out. Specifically to answer your question though with DOMS you need to break it into prevention and then management once it shows up. Specifically related to massage though: Does massage really help muscle soreness? This 2005 study says yes, ...


2

If your deficiency is in anything, its calories but it sounds like you still are experiencing DOMS as you slowly progress onto heavier weights. Things you can do to help: Stretch: After each workout you should spend 10-20 minutes stretching the muscles you primarily used to work out with. ExRx can help you find stretches as can a google search. Warm up: ...


2

As Alec said above, delayed onset muscle soreness is not something you should use to gauge the effectiveness of your workouts. Increased ability to lift more weight using proper form is the real test. If you are worried about proper form one of the best resources I've found is the Strong Lifts guide. A key way to continue to perform squats well is to ...


2

Just to expand a bit on another point of view. I'd agree that doing a whole body static stretching routine before/after a workout is probably not the best way to use your time, however stretching & foam rolling definitely have their uses. Obviously most professional athletes you'd expect do some amount of stretching and muscle therapy. Just a couple ...


2

Getting a feel for what is normal soreness, and what is an injury developing is a difficult and important skill for a runner. If you are new to this, then build up distance slowly. A few general notes that may help to tell the difference between soreness that's part of normal muscle (etc) development as part of exercise, and what is an injury developing: ...


2

Stay consistent enough and DOMs will start diminishing over time. I personally don't really get them anymore after years. They'll be a minor inconvenience at worst if I do get them. The exception being is if I took a couple weeks off. I'll get then the first workout but they'll go away by the second. Once you have them though, you just kind of have to deal ...


1

This symptom is called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. According to Dr Jason Karp: Soreness results from high force production when an exercise is new or a load is greater than normal. Furthermore, eccentric muscle contractions (in which the muscle lengthens, as when lowering a weight) cause more soreness in the days following the workout than either ...


1

Nothing to be ashamed of at all, your body simply isn't used to it. Here is a reason you can tell your teacher. You have shin splints and let him know about the pain that's been getting worse when you run. Have a parent write a note saying the this and stop by the your gym teachers office or you can drop it off in the morning at the principals office and ...


1

Lower Back Injuries / Pain (LBI or LBP) whether it's upper back pain or low back pain frequently is caused by weak abdominal muscles. Since your abs are the front anchor of your spine, if they are weak, then the other structures supporting your spine (your deep back muscles - such as your quadratus lumborum, multifidus etc.. for example) will have to work ...


1

sounds like you are not unaccustomed to the exercise regime. I suppose you could try taking a break and seeing if there is an improvement. If you are still not seeing an improvement you might investigate things like intermittent claudation or venous insufficiency. This generally happens to older folks with poor veins, a test might be to see if there is a ...


1

If the pain is sharp, you may have developed some tendinitis. Sometimes it originates from the elbow and radiates down the forearm, other times it radiates up the biceps. In either case the solution is the same: Reduce intensity on the exercise causing pain, see if you can find an alternate variation that doesn't cause pain. Increase volume on the ...


1

The soreness is a result of you working your muscles in ways they are not used to. The plyo X on P90X is intense, and I felt the same way afterward. I would say if your job requires you to climb ladders or something strenuous like that, I would say save your plyo routine for the weekend or a day where you don't have to work immediately the next day. P90X is ...


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