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7

Yeah you should rarely, if ever, plan on adding more than 10% in either distance or speed per week as a general rule. More to the point of your question is whether you want to increase aerobic speed (how fast can you run 10k) or burst speed (how fast can you run < 1k). If the latter, then yes, bodyweight exercises like squats, one-legged squats, box ...


7

First of all, you should switch to referring to different pace units. Try min/km or min/mile. In the running world speed in km/h is nearly meaningless, as you'll hardly encounter these units. Now, if you want to meet your goal, you should look for a training plan that will take you to your end goal over several weeks. Such training plan should have a ...


6

With the exception of a track event, most everything else will have hills. I've heard hill repeats referred to as "speed work in disguise". What they have in common is rather than the steady-state output you can build up on the flats, you need the ability to generate a lot more output, and then recover quickly back to your steady-state maintainable race ...


5

If you want to win a 5k, walking is a great start, but will probably not get you there on its own. Fast walking will help you build a strong base level of aerobic fitness. Your heart and lungs will develop and improve your capacity for running. After you build this base, your cardiovascular system needs to learn to function efficiently as you approach (or ...


5

Basic running concepts are as follows: Certain running intensities cause certain adaptions within your body (VO2max, lactate threshold, etc). Therefore, when training, runners often either Run at a constant pace/intensity Run at a constant pace/intensity with breaks in between, known as interval training (used for high intensities that can't be maintained ...


5

As far as I know, the fastest movements and possibly the biggest acceleration are due to eye saccades, that is rapid movements of the eye as it scans the environment. Those are involuntary and have to do with perception. Wikipedia quotes the speed at 900 degrees/second (2.5 revolutions, for comparison with ADAM). As for acceleration, "Unsupervised ...


5

Nowadays, most training plans for Marathons, includes both lots of LSR and later a fair bit of speed work. The common idea is to first build up your ability to run long distances on fat and later add speed. As the first part will inevitably slow you pace a bit over time, the later part is needed to get the speed back into the run. E.g. the first 8-12 weeks:...


4

According to multiple sources a good estimate is about 2 seconds per pound per mile (This is something around 2.7 seconds per kg per km). Note that it is not a linear formula, there is a point where losing more weight will result in loss in muscle mass, which is likely going to hinder performance. Unfortunately I couldn't find any scholarly research on this ...


4

A standard go-to for improving speed is wind sprints. Basically, you repeatedly go from 0 to as fast as you can and sustain it for a short distance, recover for a few minutes, then repeat. It develops explosive power and, if you have an external starting signal like a friend with a whistle, it helps you develop reflexes so that you start moving as soon as ...


4

In your previous question you say you're not sure if changing your diet is required...this couldn't be farther from the truth. If you want to maximize results, diet is by far the most important factor in addition to sleep and recovery. Also, this "minimum" concept is horribly flawed but I won't even address that here, I'm sure you're already aware anyways. ...


4

VO2 max is the amount of oxygen available for energy burn and is associated with runs that are shorter than 5-8 minutes total. Anything longer than this your body must deal with lactate acid buildup in your muscles. In other words I think its fair to say its good predictor for sprints assuming you are actually prepared and have been training to do this type ...


4

VO2max is the amount of oxygen which your cells are able to convert into CO2. It doesn't say anything about the anaerobic threshold, for that you need to do a Conconi test (there are many variants of that test for all kinds of sports). High VO2max on a cellular level means you have a good lung and mitochondrial function, because these two factors contribute ...


4

Will I gain weight by doing weightlifting? Yes and no. Doing weight lifting will set the stimulus your body needs to grow (gain muscle mass), but lifting alone will be of no use. Imagine that your caloric intake was 1000 kcal per day (extreme value, just to make the point) while lifting. If your caloric intake would not suffice to supply you basic ...


3

No. If your fastest pace for 1 mile is 5.30. Unfortunately the further you go the pace will drop off. There's various websites that will predict your race times based on other distances, ie I guess it works out your potential. Here's one http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/4/4_1/96.shtml You can help reduce the drop of pace by interval training and a long run ...


3

Unfamiliar exercises are harder than familiar exercises. The 8x400 zonked you because you're used to 20k runs. A sprinter used to 8x400 would be zonked after a 20k run. Things we're not good at or that we don't do are more exhausting.


3

Exercises that require increased cardiovascular activity should all help improve stamina, and exercises that require explosive muscle movements should all help improve power, acceleration and speed. For instance, swimming is a great total-body exercise that can improve both. It's worthwhile to note, however, that other exercises probably can't help you ...


3

It would look like this: It's basically a straight line. Don't take the variations from the straight line too seriously. There are so many other factors involved (wind, distance, running form, etc.) that it doesn't make sense to try to measure it too precisely. The graph above is for a 30 year-old male with 70 kg and 1.75 m, calculated with the corrected ...


2

It's a bit difficult to give you a time to aim for if you are alternating between 500 hard / 500 easy. Work up to sustaining consistent effort over 10,000m on a setting 4 (good for giving you a reasonable feeling of what rowing actually is) and with your background anything under 40mins is solid. When my team train we target 1:40min/500m hard then 2:00min/...


2

i ve been building up my pace for 6 months, i started at 34 mins for 5k. i am 39 and weighed 217lb when i started. I read a lot of stuff from the web,(there is loads of it) took on board what i thought was relevant and now i can run it in 25 mins and weigh 185lbs. The most improtant thing is to keep it up, you don t want to be trying to do your best run ...


2

You can find a deep-level answer to your question by studying D.T. Suzuki's book Zen in Japanese Culture and he goes even deeper in his essay in Zen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis (by Fromm, Suzuki, and De Martino). The picture is filled out by Eugen Herrigel in Zen in the Art of Archery. Thinking to ourselves in words gets in the way of responses that have ...


2

If you are looking for ways to increase your speed at a given distance, I would suggest running over distance. We raced 5k, so we ran anywhere from 1.5x to 4x that distance. If that is a problem for you (because of injuries or whatnot), look into other forms of cardio that are lower impact. Cycling, swimming, rowing come to mind. Keep in mind the injury ...


2

For backpacking on trails we used these values: 1 mph, you're plodding around. 2 mph, you're walking at a leisurely pace 3 mph, you're walking at a "good pace" 4 mph, you're doing some serious hustle Some high end speed hikers have done the 2,600 mile Pacific Crest Trail averaging ~40 miles a day. If I had to take a wild guess, irrespective of fitness, ...


2

Lowering a weight slowly then explosively curling it is doing a "slow negative". For fast punches and kicks you should be working on your basic barbell lifts: squat, deadlift, power clean, overhead press, push press. These are the best method for developing a high power output. Add in some fighter-oriented bodyweight and dumbbell work from Ross Enamait and ...


2

I doubt if isometric exercises could improve punching speed – maybe you meant bodyweight exercises? Isometric exercises are ones where the muscle that's working is being held in a constant state of contraction, as in a plank. Here are some exercises to improve punching speed and power that we use in my boxing class: Push jabs: Hold a medicine ball so it is ...


2

Afaik, the whole "exercise stunts growth" idea is a myth, as long as you eat enough, lifting weights will not interfere with your growth. Some people do weight lifting with explosiveness focus to get faster, but that should be done with a professional.


2

Your "steady" pace will get faster : the aim is to run faster for a longer time. It also makes running "slow" easy in comparison. I ran my first half last year and only did 40-90 min steady runs for training. This year I included more intervals and hills, with one long run per week. I definitely feel faster on my long runs ! The important fact is that I ...


2

You develop muscles during recovery. Amount of recovery done depends on how much of your muscle has been broken down by the exercise. Amount of muscle with micro-tears is directly a result of time-under-tension. Pull fast (1 second), release (lower/pull) slow (2-3 seconds). Repeat reps until failure Your understanding of exercise and lack of willingness to ...


2

Long distance runners (anything above 800m) usually struggle with speed work because they don't take it correctly. During speed work you must run fast. If you drop below your target in terms of speed after a few reps, then increase your recovery between reps. Recovery during speed session is necessary and must not be seen as a weakness. Respecting the ...


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