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11

Your spine and shoulders should be fine, the biggest risk is to the knees. In particular, running with any kind of weights (vest, ruck sack, etc.) puts much more stress on your knees. If you have bad running form, it's even more of a problem. Some quick points to think about: Make sure you have the right shoes for your total weight including the ruck ...


6

First, and foremost, you may not be able to force him to exercise. You don’t indicate how long he’s been plagued by spinal pain, but, he may also be dealing with depression from chronic pain. It’s widely accepted that the two can feed off of each other. That, in itself, is enough to blunt any desire to get up off the couch. If you can, try to get a gauge ...


4

You already have some good suggestions so I'll just add a few more. The best way that you can be supportive is to help him find a good physical therapist. The therapist will evaluate your father's spinal condition, give him specific exercises to correct his problems and determine what the most effective exercise program for him might be. Types of ...


3

I wouldn't say that cycling is "bad" for your health. There's solid research that cycling can fix a bum knee, as an example: It is suggested that cycling might be a useful exercise in the rehabilitation of patients with injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament of the knee or achilles tendon. And just to ground everyone ...


3

The major muscle that keeps the neck erect is the trapezius. It is fairly simple to strengthen it assuming you put in a consistent effort. To strengthen it in the best way possible, you should strengthen both the neck directly, and also the traps which support it. To work your traps, the best way would be weight training. The most fundamental exercise that ...


3

In general, muscles should take more load than connective tissues. Even big strong ligaments and tendons (like the Achilles) do not have the absorption and range of the calf muscle they're connected to. The connective tissues in your back are intervertebral discs, connecting your vertebrae together. They can absorb some impact, act as ligaments, and offer ...


3

It's a little hard to tell, but since you have ruled out the scalene, trapezius and levator scapulae, my first suspects would be the sternocleidomastoid, or possibly (if it is towards the front of the neck), the platysmus muscle. This website, innerbody.com has a face muscle interface that is pretty nice, you can either hover over the muscle or the name, ...


2

If it's harmful for the spine, it will let you know in the form of pain or exhaustion. Since you're working with weights less than 100kg, there generally isn't much reason to believe that your back can't handle it. Adding 12kg to 86kg isn't a drastic change. Your skeleton has already handled weight on this order for a long time already. If you're able to ...


1

I am answering this followup question: To my understanding, muscles can only pull, so that sounds like they ...putting more pressure on the disc." You are right that muscles can only pull. And yes, any time the muscles connected to your spine pull, they increase the global pressure on your discs. However, it is much more complicated than this. First, ...


1

It sounds to me as though you need to move beyond the standard gym exercises that you have listed and learn segmental stability exercises. Let me explain. I'm going to be quoting directly from this paper. The lumbar extensors can be grouped into global and local muscles. The global muscles includes the longissimus thoracis. The local, or stabilizing ...


1

Don't get a back brace! I've seen them advertised lately, and I'm actually stunned by how many people react positively to it. It shows a clear lack of understanding of what a posture problem is. I'll go through the basics of why you (think you) want a back brace, and then why you shouldn't get one. If it makes sense, good. If it doesn't, that's perfectly ...


1

Strengthening and building a muscle optimally requires the muscle to be stretched against resistance then contracted. Then why is it band to round the lower back,shouldn't it strengthen the spinal erectors? The thing that happens when your back rounds is that you're not actually engaging the erectors. You're not flexing them OR they're not strong enough to ...


1

Lie on your back against a flat surface with your head resting on that same surface (i.e. not on a pillow). Lift your head as far as possible and hold for 5 seconds; repeat about 10 times. Do this again with your head pointed to the left and then to the right. Also, it's a good idea to work out your abdominal muscles, as they provide a foundation for the ...


1

First, I'll echo Alec's comment. If you've been diagnosed with spinal stenosis, you should seek the advice of a qualified therapist. Additionally, you may wish to get another opinion and an MRI as x-rays are not the best indicator of spinal stenosis: The X-rays can show the doctor various signs associated with spinal stenosis, including loss of the ...


1

To build muscle, it is best to do a variety of repetitions. There is no magic number at which your spine will be hurting (especially as biomechanics do not cause an injury). Try to do one session a week with heavier resistance and repetitions of 4-8, and on the other session with repetition from 8-12 or higher as you do now. This way you will build more ...


1

I am 64 yrs, and had significant problems with my knees for injured ligaments near my knee. Even walking was a problem but very variable. I worked out eventually my knee problems were to do with muscle tension and weakness in my lower legs ankles and flat feet. I started with somatic exercises 4x daily to reduce tension in knees/intrinsic muscles of calf/...


1

You might want to try dumbbell pull overs as they work the serratus muscles


1

As noted by s3v3ns above, it's very hard to "force" someone to exercise. Your best bet is probably to find some low impact activities to do together, or for him to do with others. You could go on walks with him. He could join a Tai Chi group at a local community center. You want to create a situation where there are few barriers to him doing exercise (low ...


1

In general, doctors such especially GPs and those who do not specialize in sports medicine, are often more conservative and will side with caution. (Incidentally, scoliosis isn't the only condition where weightlifting may be discouraged. I have GERD and my gastroenterologist has also advised me to stop weightlifting as both weight gain and the act of lifting ...


1

Don't worry about it, it's perfectly normal with your low bf percentage - mine used to as well -. To get rid of it, you just have to start exercising the muscles surrounding (i.e. lower back). If you have access to a gym, I'd recommend doing deadlifts as that will really help, if not try doing supermans (or other bodyweight alternatives), not as good but ...


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