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9

If I were to do a split, I'd do the deadlifts on my "back" day, not the "legs" day. Here's why: both squats and deadlifts are compound movements that are best done heavy. They both do a good job stimulating whole-body growth. In contrast, curls, lat pull-downs and cable rows are exercises that target less overall muscle, which is fine as supplementary ...


6

No, there is no obvious problem with squatting on the day after deadlifting. Squatting and deadlifting during the same workout is fairly common, and fine.


5

You're using a machine for partner stretches. This isn't a bad thing; but, you need to be careful. When you say, "Ah! Too far!" a person will stop. The machine only listens to its mechanics and gravity. If you reach a point that is too far, you'll most likely not be able to stop the machine from causing injury since you're at one of the muscle's weakest ...


4

It is certainly possible, but IMO has very little practical value as working your arms separately limits you to a couple of exercises. Plus, it may be harder to keep the load balanced so that your arms progress at the same pace. Make sure you eat well and get enough sleep. Fatigue builds up quickly if either of those is missing.


4

what would be quite nice So do it then? I'm confused on what's stopping you here, this is completely your choice you either stretch or you don't. Whatever you feel benefits you more: 1) Stretching + Potential flexibility/limbering up 2) Your spare 10 minutes You only have two options pick or don't neither are necessary, you won't die if you stop ...


3

It really doesn't matter on the order you do your exercises. There are plenty of theories on whether doing your big compound movements first is the best way to do things as you have more energy but there are a lot of professional bodybuilders who do their lifts when they are most fatigued or even mixing it up each week. What it depends on when trying to ...


2

It depends on your goals, your deadlift style, and your intensity - and intensity is driven by your goals. It is intensity that determines how you split your training up and how many rests days you need. If you are deadlifting conventionally, this will probably work fine, assuming that your intensity is moderate to low. If you've only been training for 6 ...


2

One way to find out if your hip sockets are the limiting factor, is to try and do a split, and if you can get an angle between your legs of 110 degrees or more, you're pretty much good to go. The issue with people who can't do splits because of their hip structure, is that their greater trochanter puts too much pressure on the iliofemoral ligaments before ...


2

If your goal is to do the front splits, this poster is a terrible way to do it. This poster is just a random collection of yoga poses. If you want to get into the splits, look up Kit Laughlins videos. Unfortunately, his splits tutorial is behind a paywall. Or, check out https://www.gotrom.com . Again, you will need to get past a paywall. You get what ...


2

It depends. It's not just about age. A lot of 35-year-olds can do the splits, but some people simply will never be able to do it no matter how much they train. You'll either see a steady improvement over the weeks, or you'll reach a plateau. If you plateau too soon, it's likely that you'll never make it. So take it easy and don't force yourself. If you feel ...


1

I found a meta analysis that studies this exact question. The conclusion: "When comparing studies that investigated training muscle groups between 1 to 3 days per week on a volume-equated basis, the current body of evidence indicates that frequencies of training twice a week promote superior hypertrophic outcomes to once a week. It can therefore be ...


1

Common misconceptions This is one of those cases where a rule-of-thumb has been misinterpreted to be a dichotomy. The thing about the whole "how many reps for size vs. strength?" debate is that building size and strength are not mutually exclusive. If you build one, you will inevitably build the other. To your question No, you are not wasting your time. ...


1

There is idea of using antagonists, called super sets. That way you train - for instance - biceps and triceps in consecutive sets. When biceps is used, your triceps is relaxing. Triceps is not used, but also that is how our neural system works. That is one of Joe Weider's rules. Please look, for instance here. Note that in your example that is not 100% ...


1

If I do a push/pull split my workout will be shorter (in time) and my wrists will have more time to recover, but I will have to cut down the total number of pull sets, otherwise my writst will suffer. Not necessarily. More time between workouts could mean that your wrists fully recover and are ready for the increased volume. If I do a vertical/...


1

I am collecting here material and keywords related to this topic. I understand horizontal split to require flexibilities such as hamstring flexibility and hip flexibility. I understand this answer so that the user recommends sumo squats to improve hip flexibility where back straight like below by this video and this example does not target the hips that ...


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