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5

I mostly concur with the answers above. Squats and OHP are absolutely fine in a squat rack. Deadlifts in the squat rack are a gray area. I used to not be flexible enough to deadlift from the floor, so then you do stiff legged deadlifts where you usually pick it up from the rack. BUT, while you use the rack you train your flexibility to be able to pick it ...


26

Forty minutes is an absolutely acceptable amount of time to occupy a squat rack. (In the interest of changing your baseline: I know powerlifters who take a station for two hours because that's just how long it takes to get the work done.) However, gym capacity and rules must be taken into account. If there aren't many stations and people are waiting, it's ...


1

This is my take: Anterior pelvic tilt (APT) and spinal flexion should be seen as two different things. APT is the movement of the pelvis and it should occur at L4/L5. A common mistake for APT is performing it through the upper lumbar region, common for people with active back extensors. From a biomechanical point of view, APT is necessary to allow your body ...


0

So, I'm curious to know how much anterior and posterior pelvic tilt in heavy squat/deadlift increase the risk of injury according to the actual state of research All researches are either done on spines of dead animals, simulations or theoricrafting+math. Based on your standards of what you consider actual science, those studies might not mean anything at ...


0

At the beginning, I was very poor at ankle mobility. So deep squat was a problem. I was of course even worse at overhead squat and snatch. I tried all the "mainstream" solutions : lifted heel, mobility, stretching, ... to no avail. What actually helped is doing non-specific work and actually getting stronger overall. So core (real, tough, sweaty) ...


2

Whether elevation of the heel is as effective as squatting with flat feet really comes back to definitions: effective for what? Let us look at the effect of the change. From a biomechanical perspective, by raising the heels, the knees are shifted further forward without a corresponding increase in ankle dorsiflexion. The load vector thereby becomes more ...


-1

I’ll suggest seeing a physiotherapist to assess the issue because the issue may be due to somewhere else. Ankle is a rather small joint and usually issues there is a “by-product” of a bigger issue somewhere. In addition to ankle mobilisation, you can also try foam rolling your calves before your squats to see if it helps. Calves plantarflex your ankle, and ...


1

Is doing squats with heels lifted up a bit is as effective as regular ones? Yes. Will my ankles loosen up overtime if I keep doing squats like this? If not, can this be a long-term solution? Likely yes, but very slowly. You should consider doing ankle mobility drills to improve ankle dorsiflexion, there are many helpful videos on YT. Mobilizing your ...


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