Hot answers tagged

48

It's two different types of training. If all you were doing was jogging back and forth on the field, then your fitness would be just as sustainable as the other players around you. However, soccer is also punctuated with short burst, high intensity dashes that require a different type of training. This is similar to many other sports that mix two different ...


42

Your answer lies in your own question: I'm a bit of a couch potato with a sedentary job, who normally gets out of breath walking up a few flights of stairs. Recently I saw an article on TV about an 82 year old guy who has been hill running for decades, and still goes out every day. Stamina is something that can be trained like everything else. As @...


36

If you are really interested in the biology behind fitness then I'd suggest reading Dr. Jack Daniel's "Daniel's Running Formula". I'll paraphrase a few of the points you would read there. The goal is to get oxygen from the air to the muscles that need it. There are several systems involved in this process. Lung capacity Quite simply, how much air can ...


19

Getting a little more technical than JohnPs answer, what it comes down to is Aerobic vs Anaerobic conditioning. With Aerobic exercise you are keeping within your "oxygen budget", your body has enough oxygen available to supply the requirements of your muscles. When you are exercising at a constant intensity over a long interval you are in the aerobic phase, ...


16

Cardiovascular endurance and general conditioning. Simply put, the body will adapt to whatever your regular activities are. The fuel that you provide your body with also plays a part, but your conditioning is what makes the biggest difference. Muscle size is largely irrelevant to something like walking, but it can help if you were trying to sprint faster. ...


13

Whenever we start something, we may find it boring. So, I would suggest you for a change of mind, i.e., try different sports. Running is good for you at this stage. You said you are unable to run continuously for more than 5 minutes. If I were you, I would rather follow the run/walk strategy. Run for 2 or 3 mins and walk for 1 min and continue this for some ...


12

I'm curious to know what makes him (and the walkers I saw) "fit" - where does his stamina comes from? He was stick thin like me, so I guess muscles don't play a huge role in it. I can only assume it's down to heart and lung efficiency? Well, a quick look at that man's body may not have given you an accurate enough picture of his body's composition. He ...


11

If your base is 3-4 miles, and you intend to run a marathon in 12 weeks, you are very likely to either hurt yourself, or fail to succeed. While it is possible you can do it, you are starting from a very low volume point. I would suggest considering training more to build up a stronger base before considering a marathon. Usually the plan is 10% improvement ...


11

What I find surprising, is that nobody seems to have mentioned your lack of sleep. 5-7 hours per night implies that you sometimes only get 5 hours of sleep. When you are working out and practice, your body will become stronger and sleep is quite vital for that process. You want to regenerate and also replenish your energy. As others have mentioned, you will ...


7

There is a high risk of injury but it is possible. You want to get a 20 mile training run about 3 weeks before the marathon, so you have to work up your long run to 20. You can stick to 3 days a week of running, but make sure you do a long run. Below is a plan that gradually increases your long run each week. I included a floating safety week just in case ...


6

The nature of tennis is 3-5 second bursts of speed with 3-5 seconds rest for around 30 seconds, followed by 30-60 seconds of rest. This suggests that the Phosphagen and Glycolitic pathways will be be called on the most. If you are able to play explosively for an hour or more before fatiguing, it is likely that the problem is not fitness, but nutrition. Your ...


6

Nothing is going to prepare you for being on your feet for long periods of time like being on your feet for long periods of time!! I know that might sound like something out of a National Lampoon movie, but it's true. There are many things that can improve your strength, flexibility, endurance, cardiovascular health, etc, but if you are going to be walking, ...


6

In theory, you can. Stamina can be trained with any kind of muscles, as long as you are getting training is a very high volume (which implies a low intensity). Note that stamina consists of muscular endurance (which depends on the muscles that are trained), and cardiovascular endurance (which depends on the whole cardiovascular system) In practice though, ...


6

It sounds a lot like you experienced a "runner's high". This is something that usually is experienced by runners, as running is the most common form of aerobic exercise, and runners therefore experience this quite often. They run for a while, get exhausted, and achieve a sort of second wind, or as you describe it, a sudden burst of energy. When you're ...


5

I used to go to the gym 2-3 years ago. But now I rarely go, because after a break I can't really do any cardio: after 7-15 minutes at a treadmill I get really tired....I've tried 5-6 times [over the course of a year], but it's always the same thing. Your problem is that you're not giving your body a chance to get better at cardio. One session where you get ...


5

I don't think there could be more appropriate URL citations than what I am about to provide: how to look like Daniel Craig [nerdfitness.com] and the James Bond workout [menshealth.com]. Granted these are from 2009 when Daniel Craig was preparing for Casino Royale--not Skyfall which I suspect you are referring to--however I would say the advice is even more ...


5

It depends. Are you trying to get better at dancing? Or are you trying to be more fit? Your "increased stamina" could fall into either category. Or both. Better at Dancing If you want to get good at a thing, you need to do the thing a lot. So: dance more. Practice solo at home, preferably in doses similar in intensity and duration to the group class. ...


5

You'll start out warmer, and you'll warm up quicker. If you're doing an early morning run when it's still chilly and there's dew out, you'd want to wear a jumper. If you're starting a run a bit later when the sun is already out and it's more nippy than chilly, or even straight up warm, not so much benefit. I don't like spending extra time warming up to do ...


5

"I run daily" "sleep around 5 to 7 hrs per night" That's the issue. Your body needs some time to regain its full strength, and I don't mean 5 to 7 hrs per night, but more like 2-3 days, even a week depending on how intense your running is. Just run like 3 times the distance you do now once every 2-3 days like on monday and on friday, and go play on ...


4

I will address this simply from the standpoint of increasing the amount of time you can run, but I do want to point out that there are other factors that may influence this, such as your nutrition, hydration, other workouts around the run, things of that nature. You are running approximately 30 minutes, 3x a week, for around 9-10 miles total distance. If ...


4

Strength Let's take 3 different people, give them a 10lb dumbbell and tell them to lift it over their head until they are too tired to keep doing it: a 10 year old girl a marathon runner a strength trainer who can overhead press 200lbs In what order do you think they would fail to be able to continue lifting the dumbbell? Unless the 10 year old girl was ...


4

Specifically for speed, plyometric jumps onto something are good (start low and get higher), and doing your 40 yard sprints dragging something like a tire or a weighted sled; that will get your acceleration going. For stamina, probably intervals. Get a round timer for your phone, that way you can listen to music, and get the timer signal as you run. Going ...


4

Get used to the idea of running slow. If you try and extend your 3-4 mile pace to marathon distance in 12 weeks you're begging for injury (as has indeed been amply stated). If you slow down about 20%, or even more, there's much less likelihood of injury, but it takes a tremendous amount of self-discipline to run slower than you want to. Good luck, but ...


4

I would suggest working on intervals. Dave makes a good point in his answer that progress basically requires you to work at a high intensity day after day (with rest days, of course), but it sounds like you're running yourself into the ground on these workouts. Try spacing out shorter runs with periods of walking. When you start to get tired, walk for a time....


4

I can relate to your experience. I rowed competitively for a club until an injury that required surgery sidelined me for 10 months. First off, you can't expect to compete at the same pre injury level after a long layoff. It's best to set your expectations early. Just as your stamina took some time to diminish, it will take time to build it back up. ...


4

Training in the morning takes a certain amount of adaptation. Most people just aren't used to getting out of bed and 60 minutes later doing something pretty exhaustive. I'd suggest you look at two different issues here, 1) the tiredness element, 2) the feeling sick. 1) Did you get enough sleep the night before? Did you go to bed at a reasonable time? Were ...


4

There are basically three different concepts that are related in this context. Strength, endurance and stamina. Many people use stamina and endurance as synonyms, but they have distinct differences. Strength - The amount of weight/force your muscles can withstand or produce. Stamina - The amount of time that your muscles can perform at maximum capacity ...


3

For me its all mental, I go with full of energy and excitement to gym. Gym is a place where I have trained my mind to forget all the good/bad things and just complete my sets. I would recommend you to stick to a strict workout plan(a written) and try to finish it before leaving gym.


3

The short answer is that you will build endurance in a particular task by repeating that task. If you do a lot of pushups, you will build endurance for pushups, and to an extent for other shoulder-push movements. Doing as many pushups as possible is a fine idea, if you want to be better at doing pushups. If you want to be better at carrying something heavy ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible