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Yes, it's the right thing to do. Your shoulders should be retracted at the end of a deadlift rep. Those videos have the answer. The deadlift is not finished until you achieve full (but not over-) extension, and that includes thoracic extension. "You can't cheat the [deadlift] by leaving your shoulders forward" is exactly correct. I don't agree that ...


8

The 2019 IPF Technical Rules Book includes these items which will lead to your deadlift being disqualified in a competition (see Page 9 of this PDF): "Failure to lock the knees straight at the completion of the lift." "Failure to stand erect with the shoulders back." You describe a severe amount of agony in ending the deadlift with your ...


4

Stronglifts and Starting Strength are beginner strength programs designed for all ages and body types. Whether you're young, old, weak, obese, male, female, new to the gym, coming back from an injury, etc. The focus is strength gain as opposed to increasing muscle mass. With these two factors in mind, the programs target the largest muscle groups for a ...


4

This won't really be an answer but it's most likely mobility. Being physically incapable of a front rack (without injury) would be extremly rare. The usual mobility culprits are thorasic spine, shoulders and forearms. There's plenty of mobility drills online for you to try. Personally i'd recommend trying front squats with the front rack position until you ...


4

The simple answer is: No, you can't do SS without a power rack. In the beginning you can get away with cleaning the bar, but that stops soon enough. And this isn't even specific to SS. Every program should have some form of heavy squats. You just need a power rack or something for that.


2

Starting Strength feels like a low-volume program because it uses a powerlifting template to push mostly the squat as far as possible, with the goal of turning scrawny young men into thick young men ready to play sports like American football. The template works pretty well for other people and other purposes but "too weak to be on the field safely"...


2

You mentioned the lunge not being in Starting Strength, but Rippetoe has certainly spoken about it before. I forget the context and just skimmed through my books to no avail. But I believe his basic thought was "The only reason more men don't do lunges is because they see women doing them and think it's not a 'real' exercise. These men are wrong." There's ...


2

How should I train strength if I want to stay painfree and have good mobility? You should engage in progressively overloaded resistance training, following a program designed to build strength. Strength training shouldn't cause pain or loss of mobility, so the fact that you want to stay pain-free and have good mobility isn't relevant to this. Can you ...


1

@Andy I've done a fair amount of Yoga, but the worlds of yoga and weight training, in my experience, don't mix very well. I once went to a yoga class that incorporated weights, and the biomechanics of what they were doing made no sense. They don't know how to handle weights. So I would suggest, forget about Yoga unless you want to actually take a Yoga ...


1

I have a similar approach to you regarding fitness. I want my fitness journey to lead to performance (from my point of view - I don't aim at winning against pro athlete) AND health (which includes being pain-free). I personally view mobility as a factor in both performance and health aspects. If I can't lift something from the ground (e.g. groceries) I would ...


1

Answer: Half Kneeling Pallot Press.


1

The starting strength program is for beginners to learn the most important basic lifts. At a certain point though you need to start including rotational special exercises. For example just continuing to deadlift will not advance your deadlift past a certain point. Other important accessory exercises for the deadlift include glute-ham raises, good mornings, ...


1

There are a lot of functional "caveman" type ways to use rotation if youre not wanting to use dumbbells or bands. You can use clubs which are weighted differently and build balance. You can use maces, thor's hammer, or sledgehammers. These are cheap and you can buy them yourself for after the gym. You can also replicate a hammer by using a barbell or ...


1

If you want a power rack, then by all means build one. However, please keep in mind that there are many different ways to get in shape, and you don't necessarily need a squat rack. Currently, squats and deadlifts are fashionable. There is even, in my opinion, a bit of a cult surrounding them (which we will undoubtably hear from after I post this answer). ...


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