8

This is sort of a complicated question from a physiological point of view. Muscle is made of myocytes (muscle cells), which are made of a few things of interest in relation to your question. Let's look at a diagram: The myofibril (called out above) are the packs of fibers in the muscle, which are responsible for contraction of the tissue. They're ...


7

Ability to hold a plank is determined mainly by the strength and endurance of your abdominal muscles. Having a protruding stomach is determined mainly by your level of body fat. The two are not related, so you can have strong abdominal muscles with a high body fat level, and you can have a low body fat level with weak abdominal muscles. Additionally, ...


4

would this cause injury? No more than any other exercise. This all depends on your form. If you are relentlessly contorting your back in order to pull 60kg, then yes, it probably will cause injury. If you are selecting a moderate weight, and keeping a good, strict form, then no. It probably won't cause injury. would this make me stronger on this ...


3

So what you're looking for is an answer to the question "is my programming effective?". Programming effectively is a very important part of getting strong, so this is a good thing to be asking. My hunch from looking at your program is "no, there's not enough training volume and there's too much intensity". But... it's complex. TLDR I would advise you to ...


3

The barbell row really is a terrific exercise right up until (for me) you start going over your bodyweight. So if you're 180lb, having 180lb's of bar+plates tends to be pretty heavy primarily because you're probably already doing a lot of other lower back exercises. A big advantage to barbell lifts (vs bodyweight) is that you can incrementally change your ...


2

The only elements of these attributes that are at cross-purposes for a novice is cardio and strength/explosiveness. Even so, you'll be able to work on both simultaneously with negligible conflict. However, if your mobility issues are serious, they take top priority. Cardio, strength, and muscle mass all rely on movements which require mobility. Regaining ...


2

A well-balanced full-body strength training program has to take in several factors, so it will look a little different for everyone: Your current training level: dictates the length of the training cycle, as well as influences set/rep/weight decisions. Fatigue management: depending on external life stressors, as well as being able to perform the work that ...


2

These are some of my "conditioning" exercises, mainly around "core". Seated medicine ball tosses. I keep my heels off the ground, legs bent. If I don't have my buddy I toss against the wall maybe ~3 feet away. Barbell cleans. Not too heavy, something I'm comfortable doing reps of 8. Medicine ball sit up toss. Bicycle crunches. On the rings, front and back ...


2

I'm a long distance cyclist (100 miles/week when in season) who does centuries and longer rides a few times a year. I ride 2500-3000 miles/year and lift a few times a week (deadlift/bench/others, plus a lot of stretching). Congrats on doing lifting; cycling is great for cardio but can lead to postural and other issues, and weightlifting can help. There ...


2

People that say cardio is counter-productive are just people that want to justify not doing cardio. Cardio works the heart. The most important muscle in the body. A muscle critical to life. Lets say you want to bulk your legs with heavy reps. OK a long ride might limits your heavy reps the next day. But a long ride does build cardio, leg endurance, ...


2

Alcohol, poor sleep is against your training anyway. So one more, or less - is not much change anyway. Note that every well done training is better then sitting at home, even if you would not take 100% of it. Moving from obvious to less obvious things. Usually people decide not to drink, but that works for older... Young people, like you... Heh - please ...


1

Assuming you have good form, if you can hold planks for 3 minutes it has probably become less efficient as an exercise for your abdominal muscles. It's a good exercise for beginners but for a strong core you may want to introduce exercises with movement. They challenge your core muscles better as you need to use the muscles to stabilise your body. You could ...


1

It sounds like you are putting too much emphasis on Planks. Planks are a good exercise, but it is just one exercise. A well-rounded workout should include dozens of exercises. Also, Planks are a stability exercise for your lumbar spine, but they are not an effective way to burn carbohydrates (or fat). To burn carbohydrates, you should do exercises with ...


1

In my experience, splitting your workout into 2 parts actually gives you a more intense and detailed experience. Let's say I have a push workout scheduled for a certain day. Going in the morning when i'm sluggish and on a time constraint about work/school/meals etc., I can get a quick cardio/abs session in (up to you, cardio in the morning is a great way to ...


1

Whether or not it is benefitial for you to train an additional night depends on your goals. Training the extra night could work out fine, the alcohol and less sleep on friday night will make the recovery process longer though. Your liver is key in this. Your liver does a lot of things that a essential when you work out a lot (such as metabolising amino ...


1

If strength or bodybuilding or sport skill is your goal, then cardio may be counterproductive to gains on any of those fronts. That's undeniably true at the extremes: you don't see any champion marathoners also winning in bodybuilding, nor powerlifting, nor gymnastics. That doesn't mean cardio is counterproductive to all progress. That doesn't mean that ...


1

I started today a new inverted row cycle by lowering one step the bar and trying 3x3 and failed. It is simply too hard. Going back by raising the bar a step and 3x15 makes not much sense, I think, since I am already able to do that I think the training variables you can control are intensity, volume, and muscles worked. Since increasing the intensity (and ...


1

There's nothing wrong with performing biceps concentration curls in the manner you describe as long as you do them in a controlled manner. There's actually no correlation between the style of the curls you perform and whether you get “stronger biceps faster”. Stick with what works for you. And, biceps concentration curls are typically done as a “finishing”...


1

Front planks, side planks, rollouts w/stability ball, barbell or wheel, jackknifes w/stability ball, pikes with stability ball, front plank/stir the pot on stability ball.


1

The specificity of your goal makes it easy to offer a workout plan here. You want a more powerful deadlift, so deadlifting is going to be your path to this goal. There are plenty of 5-15 week programs out there, pick one that seems right for you, work it through completion, then begin another program. Deadlifting every other day for the long term will be the ...


1

If you want to get better at a particular exercise you'll just have to continue practicing it. This is a common colloquialism when people ask "how can I improve my bench press?". More advanced lifters will say "bench more". If you want to increase shoulder strength you're going to need to find the deficiency in your form or nutrition to help you overcome ...


1

It is often said that it is easy to train untrained muscles. How easy? That is said in the context of strength training. Basically if you start with an empty bar and increased 5 lbs every week you would be able to continue that pace for a few months. Depending on the size of the muscle group some will be able to maintain the pace longer than others. That ...


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