29

Yes, the difference would be quite substantial. When we're in school, there's a reason we learn a little bit of math every day, rather than have fifty teachers go through ALL the math for us in one day. We need time to process lessons learned before we go on to the next level. Our bodies also need time to process physical exercise. During a session of ...


20

The lycopene in tomato juice provides antioxidant protection during exercise, repairs damaged muscles, and also reduces risk of heart disease. Tomato juice can be better than energy drinks at helping the body recover from exercise, a new research has found (https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/science/Tomato-juice-best-post-workout-drink-Study/...


15

A workout should ideally follow a relatively strict ordering. (Warm-up) High-skill/coordination exercises or movements which you are still learning, e.g. agility drills, Olympic lifts, gymnastics Speed drills or explosive efforts, e.g. sprints, throws, Olympic lifts, power variants of the Olympic lifts Strength exercises, e.g. squats, deadlifts, presses, ...


13

The very quick answer is that Powerlifting is more about standing in one place and moving a heavy weight through a range of motion (be it deadlift, squat or bench press). There is a certain technique element to these lifts that can yield large jumps in weight (i.e. arching your back more on a bench press so the range of motion / distance you move the bar ...


12

The most important thing with getting people started lifting is to help them to like lifting. The worst thing you can do is to overwhelm them with details. The dirty little secret for newbies is they can do just about anything and make some relatively quick increases (with few exceptions). That means it matter less what they do and more that they do ...


11

I'm already squatting (80% my bodyweight) and deadlifting (little more than my bodyweight) as part of Starting Strength program. What else should I do? Absolutely nothing. Keep squatting until you're squatting 150% of your bodyweight. Keep deadlifting until you're lifting twice your bodyweight. Once you reach those goals it would be reasonable to consider ...


11

How does [someone] prepare to do 110 pull ups in a row Start by recognizing this as an extreme goal. I bet the people achieving >75 pull-ups got there by doing gymnastics or bar calisthenics for years. Coming even close to this number of pull-ups in one set is such a rare skill that you shouldn't ask anyone who hasn't done it. (Elite training is so ...


10

My son asked me to take a look at this question. I'm a second-generation phlebologist, myself the son of the man who coined the word "Sclerotherapy" (=injection treatment of varicose veins) in 1939, and who founded the organization currently called the "American College of Phlebology" (it started as the "Phlebology Society of America", which I ran for about ...


9

Any training can cause injury I am wary of bodyweight training just as much as I am wary of barbell training. Both have their risks, including tendonitis, shoulder trouble, and back problems. Overtraining is an issue under any overzealous progression. What you are looking for is not marked by any particular tool, but by cautious progression. Workout ...


9

If you can't increase the weight on the bar, then you have to settle for moving the bar faster (good for strength and power), reducing rest periods between sets (good for conditioning, hypertrophy (sometimes), and endurance), increasing the number of reps per set (good for endurance, conditioning, and hypertrophy), increasing the number of sets (good for ...


8

I'm a bodyweight training addict. In my point of view doing 1 x 50 is better than doing 10 x 5 because you have the same volume but in less time, you have more intensity. The first commandments in a post of Paul "Coach" Wade about calisthenics mass is "Embrace Reps" and the 4th is "Limit sets" source : http://pccblog.dragondoor.com/ten-commandments-...


8

You can buy dumbbell magnets to attach to the head of the dumbbells. I've typically seen 1.25lb magnets, though I suppose you can probably find 2.5 lb magnets as well.


8

If you're overtraining or near overtraining, taking a rest week (or two, or three) often results in a performance increase. Since you've had issues with overtraining before, this may be the situation. Taking time off is not helpful in all situations but it can work. Many workout programs (for instance, 5/3/1) recommend a 'deload week' or a complete rest ...


8

This is sort of a complicated question from a physiological point of view. Muscle is made of myocytes (muscle cells), which are made of a few things of interest in relation to your question. Let's look at a diagram: The myofibril (called out above) are the packs of fibers in the muscle, which are responsible for contraction of the tissue. They're ...


8

Everyone wants a six-pack and everyone wants to increase core strength, but should you do abs exercises every day to accomplish that goal? Some of the most frequent questions I get about abs training are – “Can you work out abs everyday“, or “Should I workout abs everyday“? Conventional wisdom tells you the more abs exercises you do, the better. The short ...


8

When simultaneously doing body recomposition (losing fat weight) and trying to push your strength lifts, the highest priorities are carefully balanced overall calorie intake, and a high proportion of protein. You seem to be doing okay with overall calorie intake. Keep an eye on your energy levels, throughout the day and during workouts. If you consistently ...


8

I was really into powerlifting but due to this pandemic I can't go to the gym anymore. So I started doing calisthenics/bodyweight exercise, for me the most useful exercise are these: pull ups: perform them controlled with full range of motion, then chin over the bar and arms fully extended when you descend. This exercise will mainly work your back and your ...


7

Right now, today, I could back squat 100kg for five. But if I were starting a per-workout linear progression like StrongLifts, it would be a terrible idea to start with 100kg. Even 90kg would be ill-advised. I don't want to start lifting at my 5RM or even a high percentage of it. I want to leave some space as a buffer so that I can continue to add weight. ...


7

I will give you the same answer that I give people when they ask me if they should hire a coach for [insert sport here]. If you are progressing towards your goals, and you are happy with your progress, then there is no real need to hire a coach/trainer. Now, that being said, even if you are progressing, then there are some valid reasons to hire a coach/...


7

In order to understand how to pick the implements, you need to know what they are doing for you. I'll rank the implements in order of difficulty--assuming you have the same total weight, they will feel progressively less difficult: Kettlebells (KB): Because each hand is loaded separately, you have to work harder to stabilize the KB. Additionally, the KB ...


7

There is considerable overlap between these modalities; the physiological changes that occur are very similar, however, the effects differ slightly. From an anatomical point of view: Hypertrophy training is the only modality that stands out when it comes to an increase in the muscle cross sectional area. Training power (slightly) and strength (more so) ...


7

Nathan, first, please check out this answer on myofibril vs sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. With muscular endurance, you are dealing with (to simplify things greatly) three variables: Myofibril: how many contracting fibers you have in the muscle (e.g., one elastic band vs a bunch of elastic); how strong you are Sarcoplasm: how much stored energy your muscle ...


7

I know that bodybuilding makes you heavier, stronger and more attractive, but is it really beneficial for one's health in the long run? Bodybuilding is not strength training. Bodybuilding is a very specific practice to improve one's looks. Strength training, by contrast, is training to improve the capabilities of one's body. Strength training is the ...


7

light weightlifting This will not build muscle for you. Lift heavier weights. some cardio excerise This fights your effort to gain muscle. Consider doing less cardio if you want to grow muscle. traditional Indian diet You're not giving much detail here, but more food, particularly more protein, would almost certainly help. To recap: to grow muscle, ...


7

I'll attack this from two angles. The potential and the actual. Potential This is the more obvious. A major benefit of being previously trained is becoming trained again is much easier. In other words, "muscle memory." Ideally, you will start exercising again at some point. You will gain muscle more easily than if you never trained. Furthermore, you will ...


7

As has been pointed out, you have been coming up with routines that are of questionable quality, pursuing them for a very short time and then wondering why you are not getting results. Building muscle/fitness takes time, lots of time, with attention to rest, diet and consistency on a well thought out program. I would recommend you do the following things: ...


7

I bench press once a week I personally would not expect my bench press 1RM to increase past the absolute novice level if I only bench pressed once a week. Consider bench pressing three times a week. I'm not sure I see the value in 12+ rep sets, but otherwise your approach of training different rep ranges (some call it "undulating periodization") sounds ...


7

I assume that you mean either the Starting Strength or Stronglifts 5x5 program. Either of those programs would be fine for someone who is new to resistance training, though I would also incorporate some additional GPP with either one (e.g. 20 min of low intensity steady-state cardio on a bike or rower before/after each session). For some unsolicited opinion, ...


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