29

Yes, the difference would be quite substantial. When we're in school, there's a reason we learn a little bit of math every day, rather than have fifty teachers go through ALL the math for us in one day. We need time to process lessons learned before we go on to the next level. Our bodies also need time to process physical exercise. During a session of ...


7

As has been pointed out, you have been coming up with routines that are of questionable quality, pursuing them for a very short time and then wondering why you are not getting results. Building muscle/fitness takes time, lots of time, with attention to rest, diet and consistency on a well thought out program. I would recommend you do the following things: ...


6

This answer assumes lifting aids are being used for general training. Not for physical therapy or rehab. In a general, it's actually very opinionated. There's no actual right answer as to when to start using lifting aids. Though there are a few guidelines that most people follow. First, there's no real reason to use gear for anything other than lifts like ...


4

There was a study done along these lines in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in 2010, where they did strength training for 3 months and then detraining for 3 months to measure the adaptations. The basics were that strength was measurably increased after 2 months, size didn't start changing until near the three month mark, and the tendons ...


4

To keep it simple, If its a program based off one rep maxes and you can't do sets on, for example, week 3 then you need to lower the estimated 1 rep max until you can complete the sets. I'd suggest lowering by 2.5% until you can do the perscribed reps. As a side note for powerlifting/strength sports in general. Any assistance exercises (e.g. anything not ...


4

This sort of thing is at risk of happening with any non-autoregulated program (i.e. any program that uses fixed percentages of 1RM rather than RPE or RIR), and it's really the responsibility of the program to specify what to do if the trainee fails to complete the prescribed sets and reps. So if the program doesn't say what to do in this scenario, then I'd ...


4

The simple answer is: No, you can't do SS without a power rack. In the beginning you can get away with cleaning the bar, but that stops soon enough. And this isn't even specific to SS. Every program should have some form of heavy squats. You just need a power rack or something for that.


3

Yes, you will see a benefit from starting doing push-ups now. Most people don't need to worry about providing excess protein for their system, and a lot of repetitive bodyweight exercises like push-ups are as much about getting your body to accept the movement than any buildup of muscle.


3

Note: This answer pulls from a variety of sources, books, observations and personal experience and opinion, none of which are cited scientific studies I'm going to address this in two parts, how beginners tend to / should progress at climbing (from personal experience and observation) and tendon strength / training (mainly from books and a bit of personal ...


3

So what you're looking for is an answer to the question "is my programming effective?". Programming effectively is a very important part of getting strong, so this is a good thing to be asking. My hunch from looking at your program is "no, there's not enough training volume and there's too much intensity". But... it's complex. TLDR I would advise you to ...


2

You need to be genetically predisposed towards storing fat on your buttocks, and then you need to have a sufficiently high body fat percentage to have a fat butt. It's not something that can be trained in the gym, as muscle doesn't jiggle.


2

No, not all isolation exercises are alternatable, and not all alternatable exercises are isolation exercises. Examples of non-alternatable isolation exercises: Any articulation of the spine in the sagittal plane, including sit-ups, back extensions, neck flexion and extension. Examples of alternatable compound movements: Split squats, one legged squats, ...


2

You say family history of heart disease, what is your history? Just because there is family history doesn't mean you have it. I would definitely recommend a doctor's exam first, and discuss your training plans with him/her. That being said, the science is heavily in favor of weightlifting in the elderly, as it helps preserve and/or restart muscle mass ...


2

Same boat as you. Was into strength training for almost 10 years and recently picked up BJJ with the intent of competing. First I'm going to tell you, that something has to give. You can't go balls to the wall on your lifts, then work all day, then go balls to the wall in BJJ training. It'll burn you out quick. At least it did for me within the first month....


2

I don't see why training pull-ups to failure would be worse than something else. You just can't do it every time because you fry your nervous system and need time to recover. Doing it too frequently therefore raises the probability of injury. And given that the pull ups may cause some damage to the shoulder I would assume this is the reason, the shoulder ...


2

TL; DR: Yes, and no. No, you really can't strengthen the connections of the ribs to the sternum and/or spine. The ribs (1-7 from the top down) connect with cartilage to the other bones of the chest/spine. In the cases of ribs 8-12, they either connect into other ribs or are floating, i.e. they only connect to the spine. This part can't be strengthened, and ...


2

Not addressing the workout routine, but 3 to 4 weeks seems like a short amount of time to be looking for a real increase in reps. Your form will improve and that will take more strength and maybe cut down on additional reps. Also, dropping 8.5 pounds is no big deal... you could have pushed yourself too much in a previous workout and not fully recovered.... ...


2

You want to look at rowing motions (horizontal pulling) in all it's forms rather than vertical. So... Bent over rows Gorilla rows Inverted rows (using the dip frames, if they're tall enough) You might also find that you get a surprising amount of upper back work from things like dips (if you pause at the top and keep a big chest), kettlebell swings (lats ...


2

You mentioned the lunge not being in Starting Strength, but Rippetoe has certainly spoken about it before. I forget the context and just skimmed through my books to no avail. But I believe his basic thought was "The only reason more men don't do lunges is because they see women doing them and think it's not a 'real' exercise. These men are wrong." There's ...


2

How should I train strength if I want to stay painfree and have good mobility? You should engage in progressively overloaded resistance training, following a program designed to build strength. Strength training shouldn't cause pain or loss of mobility, so the fact that you want to stay pain-free and have good mobility isn't relevant to this. Can you ...


2

There is such a thing as one-armed lat pulls. If you use a supinated grip on a v handle, or in the middle of a regular handle and sit off center on the bench you can focus on one side. For your left side, put both of your legs to the right of the adjuster pad that sits in your lap(or to the right of the pulley.). For your right side do the opposite. Grab the ...


1

The starting strength program is for beginners to learn the most important basic lifts. At a certain point though you need to start including rotational special exercises. For example just continuing to deadlift will not advance your deadlift past a certain point. Other important accessory exercises for the deadlift include glute-ham raises, good mornings, ...


1

There are a lot of functional "caveman" type ways to use rotation if youre not wanting to use dumbbells or bands. You can use clubs which are weighted differently and build balance. You can use maces, thor's hammer, or sledgehammers. These are cheap and you can buy them yourself for after the gym. You can also replicate a hammer by using a barbell or ...


1

You can do pullovers with kettlebell: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rV1aBNC2Bg I have seen guys doing pullovers with 32+kg KB. Also you can buy and use ab wheel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqiTPdK1c_I As was mentioned before, you can do any kind of rows with KB (there are hundreds of them). And lastly, bsacially any exercise with KB done with ...


1

FWIW: I think @JohnP's answer is likely the best advice you'll get. Start with a new and proven program and go from there. His recommendations are also spot on. This is my specific opinion on your current regime: Monday: legs Tuesday: chest & calves & lateral delts Wednesday: Rest or abs(?) Thursday: back & calves & back delts ...


1

If you want a power rack, then by all means build one. However, please keep in mind that there are many different ways to get in shape, and you don't necessarily need a squat rack. Currently, squats and deadlifts are fashionable. There is even, in my opinion, a bit of a cult surrounding them (which we will undoubtably hear from after I post this answer). ...


1

Fat Loss starts in the kitchen, because fat loss is a result of caloric deficit: you need to burn more calories than you eat. Any physical exercise, running included, helps you increasing the amount of calories burnt, but also makes you hungrier. To reliably lose fat, you need to a) track the calories that you consume via food and drink, b) track the ...


1

It really depends on your goals for each area. If you are planning on being serious about bjj and competing in it then the bulk of your time will be spent on "practice" for bjj. That means training the skills which make you proficient in bjj. When it comes to strength training which will help your practice but keeping you strong and giving you the strength ...


1

You should be immediately skeptical against any revelations that denies the laws of physics. The law of physics say that every action against force costs energy. Every movement of the body is an action against the internal and external resistance. The body adapts and optimizes the energy output to some extend, but no wonders are possible. If you do move a ...


1

EXRX has a set of strength standards that cover the basic compound lifts. If you can get to "advanced" on all of the columns I think you'll look pretty good and objectively you'll be quite strong.


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