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The acute increase in Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) observed in response to strength training persists for between 24 and 38 hours, indicating that we would need to train from between 4.5 (or 9 times per fortnight) and 7 days per week in order to maintain this elevated level! The 7% increase observed in this study—9% for men and 4% for women—was not, of ...


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RMR(/BMR) is determined by various factors such as your sex, genetics and age. Even the size of your internal organs play a role in metabolic burn rate This study, in particular, found that “43% of differences between people’s metabolic rates can be explained by organ size.” That being said, the largest determiner of your RMR is your TOTAL body mass. Fat ...


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There currently exists no evidence in the literature to suggest that the use of weightlifting belts during training improves long-term unbelted performance in any way. Given the prevalence of their use, this finding should be surprising. The premise behind the behaviour, of course, is the assumption that belts support the erector spinae in limiting spinal ...


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The lycopene in tomato juice provides antioxidant protection during exercise, repairs damaged muscles, and also reduces risk of heart disease. Tomato juice can be better than energy drinks at helping the body recover from exercise, a new research has found (https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/science/Tomato-juice-best-post-workout-drink-Study/...


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Don't. If you can do 100 pullups, unless you're doing it to prove a point or show off, training to do 110 is a huge waste of time, because the majority of your time is spent slowly reaching your limit, at which point gains can be made. Instead, make the exercise harder until you're reaching your limit at, say, ten reps. For pullups, perhaps make moves ...


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