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Increasing muscular endurance only makes you somewhat stronger. Increasing strength on the other hand also increases endurance. So no the correlation does not go both ways. The reason for this is: Henneman's size principle Muscle fibers are grouped together in motor units. There are typically 3 to 15 muscle fibers in each motor unit. All motor units in ...


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Of course training at higher rep ranges is useful to some degree for developing strength. Everyone agrees that it's important to build muscle and to have at least some base level of muscular endurance, even if only to be able to do a sufficient number of low-rep sets in training. Even weightlifters and powerlifters, who train exclusively for the goal of ...


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Three options come to my mind: The simplest - and probably least helpful - variant would be to just use a normalized Borg scale, which is basically the origin of the RPE tables for strength training. However, terms like 'moderate' 'hard', 'very very hard' are pretty vague and the 1:1 mapping onto strength excercises seem a bit off. At least I wouldn't ...


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