15

Your problem A passive way of working out sounds like a paradox. If you want to become stronger, you need to exert your muscles. And exertion of the muscles is an "activity", which is an antonym to "passivity". If you want to get in shape by lying in your bed, you'll be disappointed. In the end, the problem isn't that you're lazy. Most of us are. But we ...


12

First off, ask your trainer how many athletes he or she has trained that have won national, regional, or international titles. Personally, my belief is that unless you have trained someone that's made the Olympic team (or around there), you should probably put your ego in check and emulate what the Olympic trainers are doing. Training isn't an art project ...


11

I know that it's not effective to train the same muscle group every day because the muscle needs time to recover. Indeed, the key parameter here is that training the muscle essentially involves damaging it (micro-tearing the muscle fibers) and then letting your body act as the repair man; this is a process that as you noted takes time. With streching ...


9

Here's something that might help a bit. From a 2009 study: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the long-term effects of two different stretching techniques on the range of motion (ROM) and on drop jump (DJ). DJ scores were assessed by means of a contact mat connected to a digital timer. ROM was measured by use of a goniometer. The ...


8

I've read that I should do warm-up before running and stretch after running. Is that correct? Yes. Do that. Warm up by running slowly and gradually increasing the pace, or with dynamic stretching movements like lunges, air squats, leg swings, running sideways or backwards, swinging the arms, and trunk rotations.


8

Assuming you have no physical limitations, your problem seems to be a lack of motivation. Rather than doing things you don’t like, you should find an activity that can keep your interest for a minimum of twenty minutes or more. Setting achievable goals may help with improving motivation. Ask yourself, “What do I want out of exercise?”. Once you’ve ...


8

Stretching is not beneficial to weightlifting or strength training, unless a lack of flexibility prevents you from performing an exercise. E.g. If your shoulders are so inflexible that you can't hold the bar in a back squat or catch the bar in a snatch, stretching your shoulders may help you perform those specific exercises. But there is no benefit to ...


7

Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


7

Harvard Medical School recommends stretching every day, and at least 2-3 times per week. As with all types of exercise, you need to engage in stretching regularly in order to reap lasting benefits. If you only stretch occasionally, the effects are shortlived. One study found that the greatest increase in hamstring length occurred right after the stretch ...


6

There are two elements to front-splits: The hamstrings and the hips. Both will need stretching to accomplish what you want. You'll also need to strengthen the surrounding musculature, or you'll be stretchy but not strong enough to safely get into and out of the position(s) you want. The length of time it'll take you to achieve this will depend on your ...


6

Deep squats performed properly with decent weight will open up your hips. Your squat stance ends up being wide, and the weight causes your "hip" muscles (hamstrings, adductors, etc) to get pulled on like a rubber band, which stretches them. Back squats really are just that magical.


6

Check out Limber 11 by a guy called Joe DeFranco. It's a few exercises/stretches which really helped me with my squat form. I used to have pain in the front of my hip when squatting but I started doing this 3 times a week and I noticed improvements after only a few days. Your lower back will also thank you for doing this. Some of the exercises require a bit ...


6

You're sore Wednesday because you squatted Monday. Soreness from lifting can easily last two or three days, and even get worse on later days. It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. Since waking up this morning, my lower back is very sore. It is as if I did a heavy workout. I don't understand why this happened. This wasn't as sore yesterday. ...


6

Flexibility is training just like any other training. There is no gene for flexibility. And, just like any other training, it will follow the same sort of timeline as any other exercise regimen. Nobody can tell you with any certainty how you will respond to stretching, unfortunately. If you want to increase your flexibility, you need to be working all the ...


6

Basically there are four types of stretching: Static: you hold a position, not really bouncing around on it. This is what most athletic stretching tends to be since it's the easiest, doesn't require a partner, and is what most of us learned in PE class. Dynamic: this very much looks and acts like a warmup. As an example, a golfer might start practicing ...


6

Both perspectives seem off in one way or another. Your experience alone shows that stretching isn't harmful when done right, but what exactly is right? Let's tackle your two perspectives first, then we'll get to that. "After your workout, you have to stretch to prevent injuries, DOMs, and to help muscle recovery." It should be self evident as to why this ...


6

There are branches of yoga with focus on different things. If we're going with the static, more relaxed yoga poses (see: yin yoga), then we're doing a lot of seated and laid down stretching. Breath work But then yoga adds some key elements, that sets it apart from just stretching. One of those elements is breath work. By focusing on deep, paced breathing, a ...


5

The issue related to bad external rotation and bad internal rotation: a reason can be that the shoulder blades are hunched together due to reasons such as too much sitting/typing work where the hunched shoulder blades (like too much sitting, too much benchpress) can impair the rotation movements and where the right arm in the internal rotation could not ...


5

Rolling the neck is contraindicated because it can hyperextend and compress the cervical vertebrae and cause nerve damage over time. You can let your chin just kind of hang your your chest, and lean your head to the side (Think touching your ear to your shoulder) as recommended neck stretches. As you advance, you can add a gentle traction to the side ...


5

First of all, if your fingers are constantly under stress and they are not recovering properly, this can lead to nerve damage in the wrist and elbow which is known as a repetitive stress injury. Much of your 'finger' strength in rock-climbing and tennis is generated by your forearm. So increasing forearm strength will increase the strength of your fingers. ...


5

This happened to me when I started doing vigorous yoga again after an extended period of absence. My flexor muscles would cramp in simple things like child pose, but my base foot would always cramp during balance postures. It went away after a few weeks, in combination with the exercise and corrective measures. My primary training is as a massage therapist ...


5

When you have reached a certain point of stretching a muscle, it will start to tense because of the stretch reflex. Stop at the first sign of muscle tension and stay there until you can relax, and the tension and discomfort is completely gone. Focusing on slow, smooth breathing helps. Once relaxed, you can go further into the stretch until you feel tension ...


5

I don't believe that there is a universal list of stretches, but there are certainly guides out there. I'm personally fond of Craig Ramsay's Anatomy of Stretching which has both an hour-long comprehensive set of stretches and a 15 minute essentials one, the latter of which also comes on a poster that comes with the book. I attempted to scan in his quick ...


5

I'll preface this by saying this is purely my opinion based on many years of training and experience as a trainer. I, personally, would not perform “one more set with heavy weight stretching my pectorals as long as I can “ after 4 sets of regular flyes. Assuming hard work with heavy weights, your shoulders and pectoral muscles will be pretty exhausted. ...


5

These are two exercises I like for this purpose: Toddler Squat: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dc3V3f45nOI I have people hold that position for 30-60 seconds, for either three sets, or have them spread it out during the day. Harder version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQdPjpP5k8A It's good to have something nearby to hold on to. Often the person ...


5

First, a correction of a misconception. You don't stretch ligaments. Ligaments connect bone to bone, and if they stretch out, they don't go back to their original shape. This makes joints loose and easily dislocated. (Very common in repeat shoulder dislocations). You stretch muscles. Stretching before exercise - Studies have shown that static (reach and ...


5

You're using a machine for partner stretches. This isn't a bad thing; but, you need to be careful. When you say, "Ah! Too far!" a person will stop. The machine only listens to its mechanics and gravity. If you reach a point that is too far, you'll most likely not be able to stop the machine from causing injury since you're at one of the muscle's weakest ...


5

I'm not aware of any testing being done, and there is no guarantee that it would produce injuries, but it certainly could produce injuries. Some possible examples are: Torn/strained muscles Torn tendons Stretched/torn ligaments Avulsion fractures (Tendon tears away taking a piece of bone with it) Actual fractures/dislocations That is by no means an ...


4

Both the gastronemius and the hamstrings cross the back of the knee joint, so both can be tight from sitting 10 hours per day. Muscles can tighten, but the fascia can also become stuck and stop gliding well. Hydration is important for fascial mobility. Here are some suggestions: Gastroc - The simple wall stretch will target the muscle. Make sure to align ...


4

Butterfly stretch is a good one to open up the adductors (I think that's the name- anatomy newb). Stretching your piriformis would be a good move as well, youtube by Kit Laughling. Practicing activation of your pelvic muscles involved in anterior/posterior tilt movements, detailed here


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