10

The cheapest way would be to see if there are any other added amino acids other than protein that aren't listed on the label. Companies will add cheap amino acids to increase the nitrogen balance in the powder which is what is needed to fool tests. If you look at the ingredients list and see taurine, glycine, arginine, glutamine, creatine, etc. then it is ...


6

I think this is a very broad question as injuries resulting from bodybuilding or strength based exercise can range wildly depending on the intensity that someone does. The typical person that's just trying to stay fit and strong is going to have a wildly different experience and train in a wildly different manner than someone trying to get their IFBB pro ...


4

To answer your question directly, there is no inherent difference between plant and animal amino acids. If the amino acid profile of one source is identical to another, its potential value or utility is also identical. Most amino acid are, after all, created by plants, and subsequently consumed and utilised by the grazing and foraging animals that we farm ...


4

The reason why casein is considered to be a slower digesting protein is that it curdles inside the stomach, making it difficult to digest, so its amino acids are released slowly. It's reasonable to assume that this effect is unique to casein, and that all other proteins are "fast digesting". It's also pretty questionable whether this slow-digesting ...


4

There have been a couple studies looking into this. Currently I don't think any have found any evidence to support the use of these inhalants yet. Study in 2014 This one used 25 college-aged males with at least 3 years of resistance training at a weight of 85% of their 1RM. These subjects were instructed to not workout 48 hours before the testing sessions, ...


3

Summarising the systematic review, 'The Epidemiology of Injuries Across the Weight-Training Sports', by Keogh & Winwood, 2017: Bodybuilding had the lowest injury rates of all weight-training sports, at 0.12-0.7 injuries per lifter per year, or 0.24-1 injury per 1000 hours. Strongman was found to be the riskiest weight-training sport, with an injury rate ...


2

To respond to your question directly, yes, it is always preferable to eat well before considering dietary supplements. And this is especially true of beginners, since it establishes the norms by which we train throughout our careers thereafter. The Australian Institute of Sport and its state equivalents institute a ‘no supplement’ policy for all of their ...


2

First of all, it is always best to first have a healthy diet before taking any supplements. There is no scientific evidence for fat burning supplements, so I should not use those anyway. The best fat burner is creating muscle mass, which will help you increase your metabolism. Increasing your muscle mass will help with a high protein intake, but also here ...


1

Most protein powders are "amino spiked". The cost of whey protein and other protein sources has increased considerably over the past few years. The bottom line is.............. :free form amino acids are often cheaper than pure protein powder, especially since they can often be sourced from food sources we wouldn't normally ingest as part of diet, ...


1

This looks like it's a combo Nitric Oxide + Creatine supplement. Nitric Oxide is coming from the arginine and citrulline. Glutamine is for digestion. Creatine does creatine things (increases water retention in muscles). Nitric Oxide gives a pretty good pump but the pump is temporary. If it allowed you to press your workouts further you could develop more ...


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