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According to this article: heart-rate recovery is defined as the decrease in person's heart rate, measured 1 minute after peak exercise with "peak exercise" described as being as strenuous as possible, possibly even larger than the theoretical maximum heart rate (220 - age). The article also defines a certain cut-off point: recovery rate of less than ...


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While I don’t have a specific answer for marathon running, I can relate it to a somewhat similar requirement. I feel the methodology utilized would share some of the same characteristics. As a competitive rower, I am faced with racing long distances in a “Head” style race. The typical distance is 3.2 miles (~5000 meters). Granted, this is not a marathon ...


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As Julii alludes to, "zones" are pretty much arbitrary, as you are burning fat as a fuel in all zones, just the percentage to which it contributes to the whole is different for different effort levels. As you get higher in intensity, the more you rely on stored carbohydrates (glucose), and the lower in intensity, the more you rely on fat. They are ...


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There is a rule of thumb that anything below 80%HRMax is working within the aerobic zone, whereas above you are heading towards threshold and anaerobic zones (being able to sustain these harder efforts for less and less time). Personally, when training aerobically, I aim for roughly 75% and not higher, even when it comes to hills. There is thought within the ...


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I suppose those are really good questions, because most the formulae just work on rules of thumb & probably we're all too individual for the formulae to work perfectly for everyone reliably. But the question makes me wonder if the whole idea of zones is just a bit hokey, since the transition points are probably not fixed even for individuals; probably ...


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I think it depends on what you are trying to achieve. If your doctor tells you (as mine did me) that you need an HRM, that means, Doc is concerned, you should be too, and so, accuracy is extremely important. However, if you are casually measuring HR and accuracy isn't important, or, you have other means to account for accuracy of a particular device, or, ...


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Yes there's more and I'll include a list below but those are the main 3 because it is very difficult to go "full max, all out" on an exercise with the 20 second high, 10 second low; naturally because the transition stops you and you have to build up to that 95% again burning off a few seconds, or because there is a limit on some exercises as far as ...


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In Faster Road Racing, by Pfitzinger and Latter, there is a section about cross training. They make a point whereby your MaxHR for different activities is in fact different. If I recall correctly, they also noted that the MaxHR achieved by cycling was not as high as that for running - you you can expect to "max out" at a lower HR.


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Your cardiovascular fitness and genetics are likely to play a larger role on your heart rate than your body fat% Normally I would recommend long durations of lower intensity exercise in order to build cardiovascular exercise (long slow runs, etc) however you say "I feel I am quite adapted to this routine". Can you tell us what your resting heart rate it? ...


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General Answer If you want to economize I'd say that you'd be best at keeping not pace, but the same effort all along. If someone states that you should be running faster at the end, the question would be: to what aim? In my experience the key is to do proper training to get familiar with which is your own real long slow distance (LSD) pace. (This also ...


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This is a common and a good question. But, it is not an easy question. This is because there are several factors that influence what the "target" heart rate (HR) should be. These factors include: Goal (e.g. lose weight, race a sprint triathlon, race a half ironman). Activity (e.g. biking or running). Time (i.e. as you gain fitness, your heart rate zones ...


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I'm going to "answer" my own question here, and by that merely retrospectively add some context to my own situation for anyone that arrives here from the Interwebs. I ended up accepting that my heart-rate, which seemed a touch high, was fine. I felt fine (ok I felt knackered some days, but I didn't feel like my heart/brain was going to explode..) . I ...


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