Hot answers tagged

4

First I would sugget an evaluation by a physical therapist. They can take a look at your alignment and do a running analysis to see why you have such a muscle imbalance. Sometimes stretching a tight muscle can help, but sometimes it takes looking at the alignment of the foot, ankle, knee, hip, pelvis and low back to strengthen weak muscles and stretch ...


4

No danger for the muscles, joints or ligaments really. If you are used to walking and spend several hours taking a walk outside with a friend will that be bad for your body? Doing a lot of push-ups will just develop endurance, if that's what you want then go for it. Last time I checked the world record for non-stop push-ups was 10,507 and was set by Minoru ...


4

Untrained muscles are not conditioned to doing hard work. It's really that simple. The more hard work you do, the more conditioned your musculature and supporting systems are to doing hard work. People who have physical jobs have muscles that are trained to do their jobs. If that involves carrying heavy objects from one place to another, digging, working ...


4

There was a study done along these lines in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in 2010, where they did strength training for 3 months and then detraining for 3 months to measure the adaptations. The basics were that strength was measurably increased after 2 months, size didn't start changing until near the three month mark, and the tendons ...


3

The biggest problem I see with this approach is that you spend a lot of time in opposite ends of the volume spectrum. Look at total reps over time: 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 That's eight workouts in a row of fairly high volume, followed by a dropoff to extremely low volume that's sustained for two workouts. Depending on the number of workouts ...


3

Quite frankly, your best bet is to consult a physical therapist so as to avoid injury. Outside of that, one physical therapy site recommends the following: Avoid overstretching Avoid positions or activities involving extreme ranges of motion in the hips Strengthen muscles surrounding the hips, pelvis, spine, and knees (best to be advised by a physical ...


3

Finger injuries from climbing often involve strains of the tendon and/or tendon pulley, inflamation, partial or full tears and/or joint ligament sprains. You would need to see a doctor for a diagnosis, preferably a hand specialist with experience treating climbers. If you need treatment, look for a specialized hand therapist (either a physical or ...


3

It's not so much support for the tendons. One of the theories behind it is that it helps lift the skin away from the structures underneath it (microscopically) which allows a little more room for swelling, which in turn helps minimize pain. A second theory is that it acts much like rubbing an area does, which interrupts the pain signal to the brain. It is ...


3

General Strategies for Tendonitis The real general advice is something you probably already know. Listen to your body, and if something hurts, quit doing it. If it hurts when you're not active, take a few days off. And if it continues to hurt after a week or more of rest, go see a doctor and physical therapist. Advice for gym climbing It sounds like ...


3

Note: This answer pulls from a variety of sources, books, observations and personal experience and opinion, none of which are cited scientific studies I'm going to address this in two parts, how beginners tend to / should progress at climbing (from personal experience and observation) and tendon strength / training (mainly from books and a bit of personal ...


2

I was diagnosed w/ posterior tibial tendonopathy by physician at running clinic at major university. He sent me to their PT to learn how to tape the ankle. For 3 mos, I applied tape as directed and did the core strengthening exercises that he prescribed, as well as ran in place learning to acquire a new running technique in which I would strike mid-foot ...


2

You might find this post in T-nation very interesting. A summary: a study with runners suffering from an Achilles tendon injury, healed very well by performing eccentric exercises, aka negative phases. Eccentric exercises seem to be very useful for healing tendonitis, in several studies. More details in this answer Additionally, you may find useful to ...


2

What my new therapist uses to prescribe in order to help healing not very severe tendon problems is slow eccentric exercises, aka negative phases, with very light weights, two or three sets, three times a day, everyday. Now, I think that you don't need to be a rocket scientist to understand that, whatever is useful to heal and strengthen an injured tendon, ...


2

Sets are primarily a method of controlling volume. More volume means more training stimulus, which means a harder but hopefully more fruitful recovery period. I don't know of any relevance the total volume has to tendon health. A moderate weight done for 8 to 12 reps in a slow, controlled fashion is the important part for tendon health. I would increase the ...


2

Keeping your rep range between 8-12 will allow you muscles to reach hypertrophy (You can Google for many studies around this) and as soon as you can lift 12 you increase with the smallest amount possible. Always lift to positive failure and you will have tendons adjust to your new weights in no time. What is supposed to and what have been actually studied ...


2

It sounds like you may have sprained your TFCC. It is one of the most common wrist injuries when it comes to weight training, especially after doing lots and lots of pull-ups or push-ups. As a sports physical therapist, I would first recommend you to take away all painful activities, yes this includes the punching and doing pull-ups. Next, you should ...


2

Ligaments are passive rubber bands. They are not muscles or tendons that you can voluntarily contract and release and so you cannot strengthen them through exercise. They are also very poorly vascularized and take a very long time to "heal" which is why when you tear one, the surgeon can't just "sew it back together" but has to replace it with a ligament (...


2

The best advice I can give you for strength, joint integrity and injury prevention is very simple. #1 Train in different rep ranges. One day work in the 1-6 range, next day 6-10 and the next 10-15. Get strong in every rep range. This will ensure that your joints don't get beat up and it will improve your ability to recover from session to session. #2. Take ...


2

This 2010 study might shed a bit of light on your question. It's looking at damage (and then the re-strengthening) of tendons. Microtrauma can occur when the patellar tendon is subjected to extreme forces such as rapid acceleration -deceleration, jumping, and landing. The posterior proximal patellar tendon is subjected to greater tensile tendinous ...


2

Don't choose my answer. Wait for more knowledgeable people. I just want to give some suggestions. First, building muscle is very difficult. You shouldn't fear becoming bulky, it will not happen unless you do a very specific training and nutrition during a long time. Just exercise and forget about that fear (your muscles may become denser and harder in the ...


2

I did different martial arts and as part of the warm up routine we would always do hand/wrist stretching. As it would be a bit difficult to explain them via words, I looked for some videos and found this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6nS7F8ospQ and several recommended ones on the side of youtube They explain the stretches in a nice and understanding ...


1

In my experience, load management is what is most important to tendon issues. First, reducing the load (running and rehabilitative exercises) to a manageable amount. Then, slowly increasing it. Typically, we start with static calf exercises, then calf raises, then loaded calf raises, then hops like skipping for rehab. Careful monitoring of how much running ...


1

The Achilles is not just about the calves, it's also about the feet. Feet exercises such as picking up a golf ball with your toes and dropping it into a cup, or scrunching up a towel will help. If your feet are weak, your Achilles absorbs more stress. Standing calf raises are good but consider adding other lower leg exercises to your routine, such as ...


1

When people describe a feeling in limbs as "tingling" or "pins and needles", they're usually talking about the phenomenon known as paresthesia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paresthesia If you check the causes section of that article, you see there's countless things that can lead to this. When it comes to exercise, some things coming to mind are Some mild ...


1

To avoid stretching of the forearm, you should also try to avoid extension of the wrist under load. When performing most upper-body exercises, it's important to maintain straight wrists (regardless of injury or not). Wrist wraps can help a great deal with maintaining a straight wrist while performing a pressing movement. If holding something heavy for a ...


1

@Logos - as far as any exercise recommendations from the internet without an assessment giving recommendations is quite simply reckless. There cardiovascular effects that need to be fully understood. I would NOT take advice from a person trainer (no offense if any is a trainer). This is a condition very, very few will know enough about to give you safe ...


1

The vastus medialis is made up of two parts. It has a long part called the VML - vastus medialis longus And it has a more distal part closer to the knee which you appear to be describing called the VMO - vastus medialis obliquus. (Whether or not they are actually one muscle or separate is not fully known.) This VMO video explains why the muscle may not ...


1

When you are training, your whole body adapts to the stress you put on it. The speed, how different structures of your body adapt, differs. Muscles and tendons will adapt faster than joints and bones. Under normal conditions you don't need to explicitly train your tendons – and I doubt it is possible at all – they will develop as your muscles grow, and so ...


1

Tendons and ligaments can be strengthened by doing some stretching. It is better that you do some stretching before you start any exercise. Below is an article that teaches how to stretch some of your tendons: How to Rebuild & Strengthen Tendons You said that you feel sharp pain in your wrist? I have the same problem as you a month back until my friend ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible