32

Eggs, by their nature, have a substantial amount of good protein in them, 6 grams in a large egg, along with the cholesterol and calories needed to sustain exercise. In the 1890s, it was believed that cooking the egg removed some of the nutritional values and this tradition was carried on through the worlds of bodybuilding and boxing as word-of-mouth "truth"....


29

Yes, the difference would be quite substantial. When we're in school, there's a reason we learn a little bit of math every day, rather than have fifty teachers go through ALL the math for us in one day. We need time to process lessons learned before we go on to the next level. Our bodies also need time to process physical exercise. During a session of ...


21

Can one be good at both? There is a reasonable correlation between run and bike speed for athletes who do both, so if you are good at one there's a reasonable chance you could be good at the other. Here is a plot that shows performance for a run-bike-run duathlon. Each dot in each panel shows the speed of an individual athlete in two of the three segments of ...


17

The end of February is twenty weeks away. With that much time until the competition, you should periodize your training into a general preparation, specific training, and competition lead-up. Doing just push-ups might work too, but you will achieve better results with a more balanced approach. General preparation - 6 weeks For the general preparation phase,...


13

I have been running for more than a decade. In 2018, I accepted a challenged to complete a sprint triathlon. I borrowed a CX bike and started training. My only previous bike experience was riding bmx bikes as a kid, which was ancient history. I can definitely say that my running fitness made it much easier to get up to speed on a bike. After only 2 ...


13

As @thosphor pointed out in comments, the very existence of the sport of triathlon proves that it's possible to be good in up to three endurance sports simultaneously. Thus, with respect to the OP, the question in the title is trivial. Should we try to be good at more than one sport? This may be a more interesting question, and some of the OP's phrasing ...


12

Don'ts The biggest mistake people make when learning to flip, is that they try to flip into pools and onto mattresses. This is a mistake because it doesn't prepare you for the inevitable challenge of having to spot your landing. And it takes away the need to really cushion the landing with your legs. And this needs to be practiced. Dos Trampolines is a ...


12

The simple answer is both. Technical mastery is absolutely necessary for the expression of speed. In the most simple exercises, it is important to be able to relax the antagonists and superfluous muscles in order to facilitate reciprocal inhibition. But similarly, the speed of more complex movements depends on optimal coordination of position, centre of ...


11

How to know Well, since our friends looking at the problem in a very "sports science way" I will rephrase and add more details (which may not be as practical as you think. Please refer to an expirienced trainer to be the judge of the symptoms below (Self judgments can be too soft and over sensitive sometimes)) "Overtraining" might be to blame if your ...


10

At the novice stages, all activities can improve general fitness. As one progresses, however, all attributes improve in more activity-specific ways. This is less true of attributes like strength and more true of attributes like cardio. We have a general cardiovascular capability, which can be measured by activities we are not accustomed to or by VO2MAX. But ...


10

5km or 7km mileage once a week is nowhere close to proper preparation for a marathon. You greatly increase risk of injury by running a marathon unprepared. Go see a doctor about your knee pain from the 20km race and forget about a marathon anytime soon. Many marathon plans have a long run of over 20km once a week for several months (and often with a run or ...


9

Any training can cause injury I am wary of bodyweight training just as much as I am wary of barbell training. Both have their risks, including tendonitis, shoulder trouble, and back problems. Overtraining is an issue under any overzealous progression. What you are looking for is not marked by any particular tool, but by cautious progression. Workout ...


9

Jim Bathurst, known for his web site Beast Skills, says in his human flag tutorial: If you can do several full range handstand pushups against the wall, then you’re well on your way to getting the flag. Overcoming Gravity, a popular book on gymnastic training for adults, has a chart comparing the difficulty of various skills. In the chart, a full human ...


8

If i got your question right, you can't do a single push-up and you want to change that. There are several ways to make "easier" push-ups. You can try to: do them on your knees standing/leaning against a wall with your hands in a higher position, on a chair or sth. If you just want to be able to do push-ups, i think you can start by doing some of these ...


8

A difference of 0.3" (a little more than a quarter of an inch) is within acceptable measurement error on something like this. The answer to your question is: BMI does not matter for individuals A perfect example for the reason why is with the two tickets you included in your question: On Mar 4 2014 you had BF% of 16.2% and BMI 25.5 On Mar 23 2014 you ...


8

Take a look at the Galloway Run-Walk program. The harsh reality is that in a week, if you can only run 4k continuously right now, you will not be able to run 10k in a week. Your best bet if you really want to do it, is some sort of the above, where you run 1k, walk .5k, etc. Get used to the idea that you WILL be walking if you go ahead and do the 10k. If ...


7

Your absolute best bet is going to be finding a decent instructor (not a coach, although they can be the same person, it isn't often you find both in one entity) and getting stroke instruction. Swimming is a very form intensive sport, to where correct form has a significant impact on both competitive times and on longevity. Bad form can easily wreck ...


7

The ideal scenario is to test your breakfast during training, as the last thing you need is to eat something that upsets your stomach. I'm not a triathlete, but have run several marathons. For me porridge with honey worked well, with a banana nearer the start time. Personally I wouldn't have the fruit salad, but everyone is different. If you have ...


7

I know that bodybuilding makes you heavier, stronger and more attractive, but is it really beneficial for one's health in the long run? Bodybuilding is not strength training. Bodybuilding is a very specific practice to improve one's looks. Strength training, by contrast, is training to improve the capabilities of one's body. Strength training is the ...


7

Do not regret this break from your weightlifting and take the opportunity to become an even better weightlifter. The trainers I have had, most often has used about half of the workout for yoga exercises to improve flexibility, range, mobility and core strength. Exercises like over-the-head-squats demands extremely high flexibility. You can highly improve ...


7

This is very much an individual question, as everyone has different requirements and reacts in different ways to fluid and food intake when running. It's just very much trial and error to find what works for you. However, what you can do is start tracking your runs, time of day, how you feel, what you ate, things like that. Over time, you will get data such ...


7

If you were to decide to attempt a marathon given the training level you've described, there's an interesting academic article that may be helpful in estimating your likelihood of finishing without injury. The paper is by Yeung, Yeung, and Wong, "Marathon finishers and non-finishers characteristics: A preamble to success," Journal of Sports Medicine and ...


7

Reflexes can be improved for SPECIFIC actions. The rules of thumb are: When you react to stimuli, you strengthen neural pathways responsible for that action. In addition to that, you take out the element of "decision making" since your mind now immediately knows how to react. For example, you can train yourself to automatically block a round-house kick and ...


7

With the best will in the world, having 10 days to work on yourself isn't going to make that much of an impact. Body recomposition, which is what you're after (losing fat, gaining muscle) is a much longer endeavor. My recommendation would be to try and do that same sort of workout that your PT puts you through; although you currently find it exhausting, ...


7

Is it possible to train muscles by doing an exercise without any weight or resistance? Yes, in this study they had 16 young men (9 flexing, 7 control) follow a flexing protocol for 3 days a week. After it was over, it was shown that the training group had significantly increased torque as well as muscle thickness. They concluded "That maximal voluntary ...


6

Rule #1: keep it simple Rule #2: make a plan and stick with it (at least for 2-3 months) Rule #3: don't hurt yourself I've been using a combination of my home gym and the local YMCA for many years AND actually get more of a workout at home. I tend to go to the Y for more 'social' aspects. Given that, I think you need to include some 'social' aspects to ...


6

BMI simply measures the relationship between your weight and height and doesn't care if the weight is muscle-based or fat-based. You're focusing on the wrong thing: your body fat in the first measurement was 16.3% and it changed to 13.3% in the second. The second value fell within the range of your ideal body fat. You also lost over 2-kg in body fat, all ...


6

"Fitness" is a fairly broad term, but I'd provide a boiled down definition that it means your body's ability to handle physical exertion. Exertion comes in all shapes and sizes (moving a piano, walking across a city, etc), so being "fit" enough to do those things depends on the type of training and conditioning you're doing. Most people want to train in ...


6

I'm going to grade my recommendations by how deep your caloric cut is, because that affects what you can safely do. In general you will find that the larger the muscle group involved, the more calories expended in doing the exercise. I am assuming the OP is in generally good health and only has to worry about a few extra pounds. Also, my body fat ...


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