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6

From personal experience being good at running doesn’t translate to being good at cycling and vice versa. The muscles used are different and the motion/technique is different. I’d be especially careful when going from cycling to running because it’s much more injury prone. If your main goal is to be good at cycling, don’t go running (unless running is the ...


13

I have been running for more than a decade. In 2018, I accepted a challenged to complete a sprint triathlon. I borrowed a CX bike and started training. My only previous bike experience was riding bmx bikes as a kid, which was ancient history. I can definitely say that my running fitness made it much easier to get up to speed on a bike. After only 2 ...


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Can one be good at both? There is a reasonable correlation between run and bike speed for athletes who do both, so if you are good at one there's a reasonable chance you could be good at the other. Here is a plot that shows performance for a run-bike-run duathlon. Each dot in each panel shows the speed of an individual athlete in two of the three segments of ...


2

The opposite plank places load on the posterior chain. The body ‘wants’ to sag downward under its own weight, thereby lengthening the contractile (muscle) and elastic (elastin in the connective tissues) structures of the back, and correspondingly shortening those structures in the front of the body. That tendency is counteracted by the muscles of the ...


1

Do you know which is the weak link in your attempt to do a perfect one-arm pushup? How you train for this depends heavily on what's holding you back from doing it. If you can do 25 'ugly' one-arm pushups, you probably have the chest/shoulder strength to do one single perfect one-arm pushup. The issue might actually lie elsewhere, for example the core ...


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In the most simple terms: through measurement and records. Without these two practices, we have no objective way of knowing how, or even if or whether we are progressing. The more rigorous and detailed our measurements, the more we can learn about our progress. And through measurement, we can further determine which aspects of our training are most effective ...


1

Here is how to track it: strength/Hypertrophy: keep an excel sheet of all your personal records. for bodyweight, keep track of max reps. for weight, keep track of how much weight you can max lift at different rep schemes (10 reps, 15 reps, 6 reps, etc..). for hypertrophy, measure max bests at 8-12 rep range. make sure to keep all the variables the same for ...


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