6

Heart rate monitors can be broadly classified into thee groups based on how they communicate with the fitness equipment. They are - Bluetooth - Most latest HRMs these days use bluetooth to communicate with the fitness devices, including fitness watching and gym equipment. If you use the latest models, it is very likely that they use bluetooth. One extra ...


5

Running on a treadmill is even ground. There are no bumps or slopes like a road has. The downside to this is your stabilizing muscles do not get the workout so they do not get stronger. Adding weight lifitting can help build those muscles. Nice thing about the tradmill is the belt is easier on the joints, but you do not get the benefit of perception on ...


5

Given - Outdoor - Completely flat, little wind, similar surface (let's say a rubber track) Indoor - Treadmill flat, same temp as outside, mph/kph calibration is correct (this is hard to prove or disprove but if you are an experienced runner you know if it is wrong) NOTE** Just because a treadmill is on a flat floor doesn't mean you are running on level. ...


5

You are only likely to fall off of a treadmill if you set it too high for your performance limits, or get distracted while exercising. People generally run in a fairly straight line, and if you are able to keep up with the treadmill's pace, then you shouldn't have any problem staying on. The videos you see are people that try to go from standing on the ...


5

To answer which one burns more calories, that's pretty straightforward math. Steady state cardio burns calories based upon intensity level x amount of calories per minute . In order to get that number you would need to know your heart rate during exercise and either have the hr monitor calculate the calories burnt totals for you or plug it in to a online ...


5

Having operated commercial gymnasiums, I would only ever recommend buying heavy commercial-grade equipment; the cost of home or low-use commercial equipment ultimately proves to be greater, since their design, parts, and construction are simply not adequate for serious or heavy use. You can guarantee that a cheap treadmill will break down regularly. I ...


4

You've acknowledged that it is a mental barrier you are facing. The most effective strategy here is going to be to break through it mentally. You say you "usually for some reason...just get off", well, in all honesty, my advice is simply to not get off. Recognize when you are approaching this point that there will be pressure from your body to stop, then ...


4

Hamstrings. When you're running on a level treadmill, you're essentially hoping up and down on a moving belt. When running outside, you're also pushing yourself forward (hip extension), which recruits the hamstrings more. You can overcome this by increasing the incline on the treadmill, but it's still a difference that I didn't see mentioned here.


4

The motor indicates how fast and smooth the treadmill will be able to sustain a continuous belt speed. Some treadmills simply can't "keep up" and the runner can move faster than the belt can go. In which case, the runner will be forced to slow down. 3.0 CHP seems to be the base for "running speed". Track stars looking to stay in from the ice may need ...


4

From my personal experience, I can say that stretching is required neither before nor after the treadmill running workouts, unless you are planning to sprint at high speeds there, which I do not recommend at all. 5 mins of walking before and after worked fine for me. What you will need if you want to run comfortably in a treadmill is a fan to blow air onto ...


3

Start by turning on the machine and pressing “Start.” Adjust the speed to the lowest setting. Let the belt rotate a few times. If the running belt starts to shift toward one side, loosen the rear roller bolt on the opposite side ¼ turn clockwise. For example, if the running belt begins to shift to the left, loosen (turn counter clockwise) the right roller ...


3

You should definitely consider seeing your doctor as numbness is usually indicative of some other problem. As others have suggested, it may be as simple as changing your running shoes. Or, as even others have noted, lace-tying may be the cause. But, there’s another cause you may want to consider. Nerve compression. The compression may be caused ...


3

I've noticed a remarkable difference when I run on the treadmill vs when I run on the road. When I was training for my first half-marathon, it was often too cold to run outside. So I ended up doing majority of my training in the gym on a treadmill. Having said that, I found that any distance greater than 6 miles on a treadmill and I'm bored out of my mind. ...


3

I can't answer this from a manufacturer's standpoint, but from a physics standpoint. Just to compare it to something familiar, this is entirely the same as if your car is running along a flat road, and you turn the engine off, you'll still keep rolling. Why? Momentum! First of all, if you disconnect the power while the treadmill is running, there would ...


3

I'll give this a try since no one has yet. Intervals are more commonly known and used whereas the progression run is not. An interval run has fixed amount of running medium to hard at a fixed effort or fixed pace broken up by fixed times of rest or easier efforts which can be short enough not to fully recover or long enough to recover but at an easier pace....


3

Tweaking what you currently have would be pointless. You need to follow an actual plan if you want good results. Under the best of circumstances a man can only realistically hope to build a single kg of muscle per month. That's utilizing a quality plan, getting proper nutrition, and enough rest. You are making the common mistake of believing yourself to be ...


2

Like most things, yes and no, and some of it is individual. Personally, I find running outside to be much more physically challenging. Part of it is that, as your question notes, the treadmill does create a "pulling" effect, though I suspect that the majority of the difference is the basic and often minor variation of terrain that your muscles constantly ...


2

When in doubt, see a doctor. We can't diagnose you on the internet. I would lean toward acid reflux or something similar. There are so many things it possibly could be that I wouldn't take the chance. I found a link on a forum where a group of runners discussed this problem extensively which may be of use to you http://www.runnersworld.com/community/...


2

A 1 - 2 degree incline will give you enough extra resistance to adequately compensate for the reduced difficulty from using a treadmill, however there is no exact calculation for this. The treadmill advantage will vary based on brand, since they will use different belts, and the tread-board can have more or less spring, depending on manufacturer. If you ...


2

There are many various factors. Actually, there are so many, that every calorie burnt calculation is an approximation. The first and most obvious factor is - does your treadmill include your BMR in its calculations? (BMR) Your weight, age, VO2max, the intansity of the exercise (your heart rate), bloodsugar level, the temperature... Sometimes its even hard ...


2

As discussed in the comments, if you want to lose weight, adjust your diet. I wont delve into this, but focus on diverse, protein rich meals. Try to bring the carbohydrates (wheat, sugar, rice, potatoes) down a bit, if possible. Cardio exercises like running on a Treadmill or Elliptical are good for your endurance, but as they drain a lot of energy you ...


2

Ali, your current exercise routine goes: 30 mins treadmill jogging - 260 calories 10 mins cycling - 40 calories Subway both times - daily lunch/dinner from Subway (correct me if the assumption is wrong) Questions: Apart from Subway meals, do you consume any other snacks or meals? Did you perform your exercises everyday? What's your current weight? ...


2

Don't be dis-heartened, you may have started to tone, and may of actually started to lose inches, so you should take measurements as well as using the scales. I often find that clients have lost no weight, yet they have lost 2 inches around their waist. As per previous comments, a week is a very short time to see a difference. When you exercise more ...


2

Assuming an active lifestyle, you need to start with knowing how many calories you need to maintain your weight. The easiest way to do that is to maintain a food diary. Record everything you eat and drink. The simple act of recording your caloric intake will remove all guess work. Once you've established how many calories you need to maintain, simply cut ...


2

Your foot very likely could have changed shaped a bit, and your shoes certainly will. Having two pairs of running shoes is always nice from an injury prevention standpoint in that different shoes tend to stress you in different ways and change your angles ever so slightly, so it's a good investment. In order I would try: A new pair of shoes, especially ...


2

For my TR4000i, it's a plain text file IHPUSER.TXT: name,jason, age,45, sex,male, weight,167, height,70, I don't know how to accomplish this in this editor, but the file ends below the "height,70," line rather than at the end of it. There may be more to this file/format that I just I haven't entered on the LifeSpan web site. And further detail on the ...


2

I just ran on a 1200i and a USER.TXT file showed up in the root of my USB with the following data. Here is my guess for the fields: Date,Time,?,??,??,Speed,Distance,??,??,?? 11/04/2015,06:18:01,T,000,0000,0000,00.5,00.00,0000,,E, 11/04/2015,06:18:22,T,000,0000,0000,00.5,00.00,0000,,E, 11/04/2015,06:19:08,T,000,0000,0015,03.0,00.01,0000,,E, 11/04/2015,06:19:...


2

This is a common thing, and in most cases, easy to fix. Incline on the treadmill puts more stress on the lower back When walking or running uphill, the load on the muscles change. You are forced to lean forward, your back muscles have to compensate a lot more to keep you erect. The hip flexors also have to work more, because you need to lift your knees ...


2

Though the cause of DOMS still isn't totally understood, most contemporary research suggests that the pain comes from nerve sensitivity caused by bradykinin during the muscle repair process. Having said that, if you're still sore, your body is probably still repairing--let it do its thing. I would hold off on jogging at the pace that's causing the soreness ...


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