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5

It's not really a case of dips hitting chest instead of triceps. Dips hits both. But depending on how you do it, it will be working one more than the other. If you want to engage triceps more, try not going down beyond a 90 degree elbow bend, and make sure you lock your arms out completely on every rep. It's the upper part of the lift that engages triceps ...


5

Biceps and Triceps are antagonist muscles. That means when one is the primary mover, the other simply lends stability. The concept that an exercise is for a particular muscle group simply means that the primary movers do most of the work. Because they are antagonist muscles the only thing that can hit them about the same is a static hold for time. Even ...


4

I honeslty don't know if it's a muscle imbalance, a form issue, or other. What I would do though is deload to the point where your triceps aren't burning and then slowly progress up from there. This gives you two benefits. Deloading allows you to focus on form to make sure you are doing everything properly and reduces the chance of injury. This also ...


4

In order to engage your chest during dips, lean forward slightly. It doesn't really have to do with the width of the bars, rather the angle of your lean. That being said, leaning forward will still work your triceps as well. See this article for some good info on dips.


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You're right that certain rep ranges primarily cause certain types of adaptation. But that's not the end of the story. A good example of that is the legs of high level cyclists. Most of these folks aren't doing strength training, and certainly very few are training for hypertrophy, but their legs are both strong and tend to be very muscular. In the short ...


4

Without seeing your form, it’s hard to determine what may have caused your problems. Typically, it’s your elbow that tends to react to the load if your form is incorrect, or, the weight is too heavy. Couple that with the force of gravity during overhead extensions, and, you may have a recipe for chronic pain. In your case, I would avoid any triceps ...


3

It depends on how you use it. Yes, it can cause an imbalance (going by the picture you reference) if you overload one side or the other with weights consistently or you never switch and always push with the same hand and pull with the other. However, I would imagine that it is meant to be used in alternating set fashion, to where you push with the left ...


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Several things can affect the size and makeup of your muscles: What you eat. Eating carbs post workout can help increase the size of the muscles for a time. Also, more fat in your muscle tissue adds to the bulk. If you burn that fat, the muscle appears to shrink even though the strength is unaffected. How you train. Long endurance work makes muscles ...


3

Soreness (DOMS: Delayed onset muscle soreness) is not a good indicator of work effort. Check out this answer for more info, specifically on the types of things that cause DOMS and the things that don't. If you want sore triceps, do heavy skull crushers. If you want sore hamstrings, (carefully) do good mornings. They make you sore because they are eccentric: ...


3

If you're not seeing muscle increase in your arms, it's either you're not working the muscles hard enough or you're using bad forms. You don't necessarily need to change your routine. First, check your forms and ensure that you're lifting the weights appropriately. That might require you watching a lot of videos and practise in order to use the proper ...


3

Yes, deadlifting once a week is better than not deadlifting once a week. It won't, however, work very well at making your arms or legs bigger. Maybe look into making a makeshift dip station at home for some quick tricep workouts that don't interfere with studying.


3

I would recommend the book "Never Gymless" for someone in your situation, imo it is the resource for training without equipment. It has 100s of equipment free exercises for building all aspects of fitness including strength. Some of the exercises are listed below. Strength Exercises: Pushups, Diamond Pushups, Clapping Pushups, One handed Pushups, Pike ...


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When doing dumbbell bench press, you feel that your triceps is the weakest link among all muscles involved. So at first glance, attempting to strengthen your triceps with isolation workouts in order to get it up to par with the other muscles seems like the appropriate thing to do. It most probably is not. Judging from the numbers you gave in your other ...


2

I've had similar problems with my triceps and the best exercise I've found is doing dips. But to start out you might want to try them with the assistance of a bench or a machine.


2

I find it really hard to believe that you have a meagre 15 minutes each day to exercise. If that is the case, you should take a serious look at moving around your schedule to allow more time, at least half an hour to 40 minutes. Stay up later, prepare meals in advance to reduce time spent cooking, etc. Before I explain some things that I do without ...


2

These two points might seem pretty simple however extremely important and good to know. First rule, STOP your workout exactly when injury happened and DO NOT continue the session. In the coming weeks, don't leave the injured muscle/joint isolated due to the injury. The trick is not to directly work it directly, but to work around it. In more details: As ...


2

You most likely have developed tendonitis. Several causes for this problem: Bad form. You should either ask someone experienced to take a look at your form or record yourself so that you can watch for any mistakes. Too heavy too often. You're using too heavy weight and too often (85%+ 1RM sets 2+ days a week). While your muscles may be ready to take on the ...


2

As stated by @BerinLoritsch, you cannot work both at the same exact moment. You can, however, achieve muscle engagement of both by doing muscle-ups. They are difficult if you're just starting out and will probably require steady pull-up progression before they can be achieved. Here's a video of how they've performed. You'll use your biceps to get you to the ...


2

The ideal exercises for training to carry stuff are, surprisingly, carrying stuff. On the assumption you can't find a willing person to be carried around, then something like sandbag work would be ideal. You can do sandbag carries for distance or time, in a bearhug or cradle position, practice picking it up off the floor, you can even try pressing it ...


2

As alluded to, this is an anatomy question. The term -ceps in muscle anatomy means "heads", or the origin of a muscle. Each muscle has two points of contact (for simplicity), the origin and the insertion. Muscles contract and pull towards the origin, and the insertion moves. So, biceps means "two heads", and the action of the muscle is to flex the lower ...


2

It's kind of inherent in the exercise that you're not able to do much weight. It's an isolation and it's hard to cheat. Skull crushers are a tricep go-to for me; I have a few tips. Rotate your hands. When coming down rotate so that your palms are facing your head, rotate outward at the top so your palms are facing out. Bonus is that you can come down ...


1

I would never have specific arm days namely because of what you said; they get engaged heavily on back/chest days respectively. If you want to get some more arm action going on, you could instead add a bicep segment to the end of your back day, and a tricep segment to the end of your chest day. That way, they're already warmed up, and probably even tired. ...


1

Well, I would ask you this simple question : What is the point of your training ? Is it doing as many reps as possible, or is it building more muscle ? I would guess the second one is your concern. In that regard, what you are looking for is destroying you muscle fibers in order for your body to overcompensate for your losses. Remember this : When it ...


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This is what the American College of Sports Medicine published as their Position Stand on workout programs designed for Hypertrophy (mass): Evidence from well-designed Randomized Control Trials that provide a consistent pattern of findings in the population for which the recommendation is made. ... It is recommended that single- and multiple-joint ...


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There are a variety of triceps exercises you can perform. However, if done incorrectly, some of them can impact shoulder problems. To lessen any potential problems, I’d suggest you warm up by doing some light shoulder stretching, and, use relatively light weight to begin. I’ll list a few, but, if they cause discomfort, you should stop immediately. ...


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A very good exercise for biceps and back is the chin up. The primary cause of injuries is ego/pride. Going for a new max weight in heavy exercises like deadlifts. As long as your exercises are controlled, the risk of injury is small. Stretching has no benefit in injury prevention or soreness prevention, in fact it will make you weaker and thus more likely ...


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