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5

Biceps and Triceps are antagonist muscles. That means when one is the primary mover, the other simply lends stability. The concept that an exercise is for a particular muscle group simply means that the primary movers do most of the work. Because they are antagonist muscles the only thing that can hit them about the same is a static hold for time. Even ...


5

It's not really a case of dips hitting chest instead of triceps. Dips hits both. But depending on how you do it, it will be working one more than the other. If you want to engage triceps more, try not going down beyond a 90 degree elbow bend, and make sure you lock your arms out completely on every rep. It's the upper part of the lift that engages triceps ...


4

In order to engage your chest during dips, lean forward slightly. It doesn't really have to do with the width of the bars, rather the angle of your lean. That being said, leaning forward will still work your triceps as well. See this article for some good info on dips.


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You're right that certain rep ranges primarily cause certain types of adaptation. But that's not the end of the story. A good example of that is the legs of high level cyclists. Most of these folks aren't doing strength training, and certainly very few are training for hypertrophy, but their legs are both strong and tend to be very muscular. In the short ...


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Without seeing your form, it’s hard to determine what may have caused your problems. Typically, it’s your elbow that tends to react to the load if your form is incorrect, or, the weight is too heavy. Couple that with the force of gravity during overhead extensions, and, you may have a recipe for chronic pain. In your case, I would avoid any triceps ...


3

It depends on how you use it. Yes, it can cause an imbalance (going by the picture you reference) if you overload one side or the other with weights consistently or you never switch and always push with the same hand and pull with the other. However, I would imagine that it is meant to be used in alternating set fashion, to where you push with the left ...


3

Yes, deadlifting once a week is better than not deadlifting once a week. It won't, however, work very well at making your arms or legs bigger. Maybe look into making a makeshift dip station at home for some quick tricep workouts that don't interfere with studying.


3

Soreness (DOMS: Delayed onset muscle soreness) is not a good indicator of work effort. Check out this answer for more info, specifically on the types of things that cause DOMS and the things that don't. If you want sore triceps, do heavy skull crushers. If you want sore hamstrings, (carefully) do good mornings. They make you sore because they are eccentric: ...


3

If you're not seeing muscle increase in your arms, it's either you're not working the muscles hard enough or you're using bad forms. You don't necessarily need to change your routine. First, check your forms and ensure that you're lifting the weights appropriately. That might require you watching a lot of videos and practise in order to use the proper ...


3

When doing dumbbell bench press, you feel that your triceps is the weakest link among all muscles involved. So at first glance, attempting to strengthen your triceps with isolation workouts in order to get it up to par with the other muscles seems like the appropriate thing to do. It most probably is not. Judging from the numbers you gave in your other ...


3

If you're not seeing results working a body part once per week, I recommend trying to work that body part more often. Soreness doesn't really enter into the question unless it is debilitating. I have not personally found that exercise variety makes a big difference for most adult men who are relative beginners, like you and me and everyone else bench ...


2

These two points might seem pretty simple however extremely important and good to know. First rule, STOP your workout exactly when injury happened and DO NOT continue the session. In the coming weeks, don't leave the injured muscle/joint isolated due to the injury. The trick is not to directly work it directly, but to work around it. In more details: As ...


2

You most likely have developed tendonitis. Several causes for this problem: Bad form. You should either ask someone experienced to take a look at your form or record yourself so that you can watch for any mistakes. Too heavy too often. You're using too heavy weight and too often (85%+ 1RM sets 2+ days a week). While your muscles may be ready to take on the ...


2

The ideal exercises for training to carry stuff are, surprisingly, carrying stuff. On the assumption you can't find a willing person to be carried around, then something like sandbag work would be ideal. You can do sandbag carries for distance or time, in a bearhug or cradle position, practice picking it up off the floor, you can even try pressing it ...


2

I am right-handed and always favor the right side when working. That's pretty much the reason for the asymmetry in your body. In fact, most people have these kinds of issues when they train. Simply because our dominant hand tries to compensate for the weaker hand. You can fix this by balancing the amount of work according to how much the difference there ...


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As alluded to, this is an anatomy question. The term -ceps in muscle anatomy means "heads", or the origin of a muscle. Each muscle has two points of contact (for simplicity), the origin and the insertion. Muscles contract and pull towards the origin, and the insertion moves. So, biceps means "two heads", and the action of the muscle is to flex the lower ...


2

As stated by @BerinLoritsch, you cannot work both at the same exact moment. You can, however, achieve muscle engagement of both by doing muscle-ups. They are difficult if you're just starting out and will probably require steady pull-up progression before they can be achieved. Here's a video of how they've performed. You'll use your biceps to get you to the ...


2

It's kind of inherent in the exercise that you're not able to do much weight. It's an isolation and it's hard to cheat. Skull crushers are a tricep go-to for me; I have a few tips. Rotate your hands. When coming down rotate so that your palms are facing your head, rotate outward at the top so your palms are facing out. Bonus is that you can come down ...


2

there are a few ways you could modify your push ups to lighten the load You can perform the push up from your knees instead of from your toes like the classic push up you can do a push up but instead of from the floor, you use like a bench or a chair that wont move so that you are not going parallel to the floor, but rather at an angle. also, you can try ...


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The function of all muscles depends upon the relative positions of the bones that they control. Most anatomy references analyse muscle movement from standard anatomical position, and hence fail document the full breadth of movement that some muscles can affect. And this is particularly true of the shoulder girdle, since it is comprised of a shallow ball-and-...


2

Train your triceps close to exhaustion with the least boring exercise in your arsenal. Eat based on how tired you are. Sleep more if possible, sleep better by taking cold showers right before going to bed to lower your blood temperature and get your body into a lethargic state... Possibly also have a fat heavy meal to weigh you down. If you can, stay away ...


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A lot of times it's because you're using more weight than you are capable of handling and those other muscles are taking over to compensate for weaknesses in your back musculature. If you're starting out, it's going to get some taking used to and developing the cues you need to hit those desired muscle groups properly. One big cue for rows is to pull with ...


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This is an anatomy question more than anything, but in the context of fitness here is a look at both as a brief overview. The biceps are a muscle group consisting of two “heads” on the front of the arm, they are responsible for many pulling movements. The triceps are a muscle group consisting of three “heads” on the back of the arm, they are responsible for ...


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I would never have specific arm days namely because of what you said; they get engaged heavily on back/chest days respectively. If you want to get some more arm action going on, you could instead add a bicep segment to the end of your back day, and a tricep segment to the end of your chest day. That way, they're already warmed up, and probably even tired. ...


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These are my old clinical notes from DPT school. NOTE: These are being provided to help you better understand what is happening. You MUST have this evaluated by your local PT and they will create your treatment plan accordingly. Medial Epicondylitis – Overuse of muscles attaching to medial epicondyle – pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis are most ...


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In most cases, yes, triceps can affect your performance on chest exercises. Any exercise that involves some sort of pressing the weight away from you will use your triceps to some degree. However, the wider your grip is, the more emphasis will be placed on your chest. Flyes are an example of a chest exercise that place very little emphasis on the triceps (...


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Well, I would ask you this simple question : What is the point of your training ? Is it doing as many reps as possible, or is it building more muscle ? I would guess the second one is your concern. In that regard, what you are looking for is destroying you muscle fibers in order for your body to overcompensate for your losses. Remember this : When it ...


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