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Functionally, is doing a push up equivalent to doing a body weight bench press? Functionally close enough as a movement to where pushups can be a reasonable alternative for beginners. But a bodyweight pushup is nowhere near the same feat of strength as doing a bodyweight bench press. When you do a pushup, consider how far each body part travels. your ...


10

It's important to keep one's legs in good working order for anyone who wants to retain the ability to get out of bed, climb stairs, stand up off the toilet, walk around a hilly neighborhood, run away from a fire or other emergency, or sit down to play with a child on the floor. People who are okay not being able to do these things without someone else's help ...


9

You reduce body fat by being in a caloric deficit (burning more calories than you eat/drink). You build muscle by having a positive nitrogen balance (usually by having enough protein in your system). Balancing those two things can be tricky at times, but is definitely possible, especially for those new to muscle building. And yes, you’ll want to focus on ...


8

A regular push-up is a bench press plus isometric core exercise When it comes to the muscle groups involved in actually lifting your face off the ground, a regular push-up and a bench press are identical. Spacing your hands differently and/or rotating your hands for a press-up will engage different muscle groups. These can also be done with a bench press to ...


7

I'd like to break down a few things first which I think might help to explain what I think is going on with your situation. First off, great work on starting with chinups / pullups. They are a terrific compound exercise that works basically everything from your mid back to your fingers. Bicep curls on the other hand are maybe not the most absurd exercise, ...


7

You should definitely do the big compound movements. Deadlifts, Bench press, Shoulder press (standing). Doing shoulder press while standing will add that you'll be contracting your core to stabalize, making it an exercise that works your shoulders, arms and entire core. You can also do pull-ups and/or bend-over rows for your back. If you feel like your upper ...


6

It's perfectly common to warm up your upper body by simply doing upper body work. If you're doing bench press, for instance, let your warmup consist of 5-6 lightweight, high-repetition sets of bench press, before you jump into your working sets. In between these sets, I recommend some light, dynamic stretches, just to keep the blood flowing even while ...


6

Large muscle groups develop in a more obvious way than the smaller ones. That said, you clearly understand how to build muscle through effective diet and exercise. Arms can be trained through a number of means, there are 3 major muscle groups. I'll list the best exercises that have their major focus on that muscle group but are the best compound version: ...


5

The hardest part will be the transition when you are at the top of your pull up. To start, do this motion in reverse. Start by jumping up and getting yourself in the position that you would be in at the top of the muscle up, with your arms locked looking down on the bar. Then, slowly lower yourself down into the position you would be in at the top of the ...


5

Right off the bat, you can't reduce fat from any particular part of your body. Spot reduction is a myth. Most of the chest exercises you're looking at will build your chest proportionally. In general, the more inclined a movement (closer to over your head), the higher the pec area will be used. The more declined the movement is, like in dips, the lower the ...


5

If you're doing this, stop it immediately. You WILL hurt yourself. Muscle gains are made by doing movements with physical resistance (weights). We need to break down the muscle fibers through intense exertion, and then our nutrition and rest make sure they're built back up, stronger and bigger. Arm circles have no resistance besides air resistance, and the ...


5

It's likely all the bench-pressing that you're doing. Too much volume: 10x10 is a very high-volume program. Most lifters stick to around 3x10 or 4x8 for hypertrophy. It also might be a muscle imbalance. Your pectorals are stronger than your back-muscles, and it's screwing with the (very complicated) structures in your shoulders. Take a break from benching ...


5

Exercises that build muscle in your upper arms, shoulders, and upper back can make your shoulders look wider, but they won't change the actual distance between your joints. Although weight-bearing exercise can increase bone density, the basic geometry of your skeleton isn't really altered by exercise. There's no exercise that will make you taller or have ...


5

In short, Yes! There are two aspects to this: Bone Muscle Bone: Any exercise that places regular stress on a given bone will increase bone density overtime. For the wrist specifically, strengthening the forearm and hand muscles (in the forearm) will have the greatest effect. When you do these other exercises these muscles are still indirectly ...


5

"Body building" is about body modification: unless your dead set on it I would highly recommend an effective strength training program. A book recommendation I'd toss at you is The Barbell Prescription: Strength Training for Life After 40. I'm around your age, and still hover between intermediate and advanced in recognized strength standards. As I've gotten ...


4

Here is a diagram of a person in the bottom position of the push-up: Let us call his length L and his mass m. We place an origo in the foot. Let us assume that his Center Of Mass is located at x=1/2L and that his shoulders are at x=3/4L. His mass creates a clockwise torque trough the foot: M1=1/2Lmg, where g is gravity of earth. In order to lift himself up ...


4

I need suggestions for good home workouts that could grow bigger arms/biceps/forearms I only know of push-ups. A simple beginner routine could consist of push-ups targeting the triceps, pecs, and anterior deltoid. pull-ups targeting the lats, traps, posteriod deltoid, biceps, and teres major. squats targeting the glutes, quads, hamstrings, adductor, hip ...


4

The overhead press can be performed either with a curved bar path and little body movement, or a more vertical bar path and more body movement. These can be considered two different lifts. In the overhead press, the bar starts in front of the shoulders, and ends directly above the shoulders. This means that if the lifter is standing upright, the bar must ...


3

Honestly, cut the machines out of your routine, and add in the free weights (barbell/ olympic lifts). I suggest getting on a strength training program such as StrongLifts, Ripetoes Starting Strength, Candito, etc. I personally use StrongLifts as my current program. A strength training/powerlifting program is going to shred any unwanted fat, give you the ...


3

If I understand correctly you are currently doing 15+4+2 = 21 press-ups every other day, which equates to less than 80/week and probably around 10 minutes of exercise. This is probably simply not enough to progress past the very begginer gain and you'll have to just do more. Like all other contributors suggested, maybe not going to failure will allow you to ...


3

Are you doing pressups every day? If so, it may be that the muscles are fatigued. Muscles actually become stronger during the recovery process. So if you haven't had a day off for awhile, try that. Otherwise, I'd agree with @LarrisaGodzilla


3

I would advise to not use your child for weight resistance training. Who will spot you? How about just play with your kid.


3

There's nothing wrong with what you're doing. The main reason you're not having the same results as when you were 15, is simply because you're not 15 any more. During the teens, your body is still growing, and whatever training you do, will impact HOW your body grows. In your case, you were bicycling while your body was undergoing huge changes, so it was ...


3

Part 1 There are a lot of questions here, I'll try to answer each of them individually: What's wrong with [my] workout routines for muscle building? Taking a look at them, you do the following: You work out twice a week 45 minutes in each workout 4 sets with 12 reps per each muscle group (implying compound exercises). To me, that is a relatively low ...


3

“I was thinking of doing arms 2-3 times a week.Is it good to do that and if i do that how i'm gonna cover my other body parts.” If your goal is a balanced, aesthetic physique, then, “more is not necessarily better”. Hypertrophy is a very individual thing. There’s no specific set of exercises that will guarantee you growth for a specific muscle group. ...


3

No, you do not need a specific routine to even out a muscle imbalance, and attempting to do so will likely only make it worse. Here's why you don't want to do specific work to correct the perceived strength imbalance: Let's say you have a left pectoral that is weaker than the right. So you do a bunch of dumbbell chest flies and bench presses with the left ...


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