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The Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET), a measurement of the rate at which an activity burns energy, scaled to the bodyweight of the person performing that activity, is likely a good way to compare the two, though it is based on the time spent performing the activity, rather than distance travelled. ExRx has a MET calculator available which allows comparison ...


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No The caloric deficit will be compensated by fat burning again, so, let's consider another 350 kcal from fat. This is not what happens. Your caloric deficit was generated by the brisk walk. If you were to eat an additional 500 calories, then the fat/energy burned during the brisk walk will be replenished. At the end of the day your calories burned / fat ...


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TLDR: Toe walking is likely not "unhealthy". There is a study that classifies Idiopathic Toe Walking in children as a cosmetic deformity. It also briefly mentions adult toe walking. "Anecdotally, adult toe walkers have a “bouncing” or “mincing” gait with less than normal heel contact during stance phase. Whether this results in any problems is ...


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Moving more is always worth it if you can. If all you can manage is normal walking, then do that. If you can walk briskly, do that too. If you can work out vigorously, do that too. How much "sub-brisk" walking will help you depends who you are. For people who are recovering from major surgery or a rough birth, or who have another condition like ...


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The two will burn the same amount of energy, and so there will not be any difference between the two in terms of fat loss. If you were running at a pace that you could sustain for 20 minutes but not for 40 minutes, then putting the walking break in the middle would be beneficial because it would allow you to run faster than you could if you did all the ...


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