6

High protein High protein foods are very satiating. It'll also help with muscle retention. High fiber Broccoli, cauliflower, squash (when in season), and basically a lot of vegetables are highly satiating. Do not buy bars or processed foods that are labeled "high fiber". They are absolutely lying, and you'll end up eating a ton of sugar for a few ...


6

In my opinion, spot reduction is still a myth if you consider how spot reduction has been defined for years. The study as well as another article I found, are both pro-spot-reduction but I don't think it is in the same sense as what most people think. When I think spot reduction, I think that if all I do is crunches then I'm going to burn fat in my mid-...


5

No. One is a style of training and the other is a philosophy on training. They can co-exist but one can't replace the other. You can do HIIT "intuitively" by only doing the sets that you "feel" is good enough. Though, that's what you should be doing anyway. If, for some awful reason, your HIIT program says to do 15 cycles, but you're about to fall down at ...


5

Contrary to the common myth, a regimen consisting of a mixture of strength and endurance training—as you are doing—will generally lead to a loss of fat mass, and a corresponding gain of fat-free (muscle) mass. Far from being an unattainable or theoretical ideal, it is the norm, provided that your diet is neither excessively restrictive nor overabundant, and ...


5

The answer lies in your balance of energy input and output, so let us examine that question. The average Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) for an individual of your mass is around 2,000 Calories for men or 1,800 Calories for women. (The larger you are, the higher your metabolic rate.) Thus, even without considering the exercise you are doing, your Total Daily ...


5

No you don't. It won't affect body composition in any serious fashion.


4

You certainly can "lose weight, without being hungry." When it comes down to the science of it all, losing actual fat is simply math. That calorie deficit you mentioned is key. In order to lose fat, you NEED to be in a caloric deficit. Technically, you can eat whatever you like—as long as you are still in a deficit. The reason we lean towards the ...


4

Muscle loss cannot be inferred purely through changes in body fat percentage. The reason being that muscle is only one component of fat free mass. Experienced natural bodybuilding competitor and coach Alberto Nunez has talked about a sort of rule of thumb for weight loss which boils down to 20% of all long term weight loss being water. With this in mind, ...


4

Provided that your fat mass is lost through sustainable means—an adequate diet, hydration, and low-intensity activity—or provided that you have refueled and rehydrated after a restrictive diet and/or high-intensity training regimen, the equation you have derived is correctly balanced. So your formula is entirely correct, provided that you can fairly assume ...


4

The substrate of energy that your body utilizes during exercise essentially has zero impact on your body’s overall fat stores. This is because any fat that is utilized for the purpose of providing energy will later be replenished the next time you eat - unless you are in a calorie deficit. The reason that your body uses different energy sources in the first ...


4

None of this is necessary. Plenty of people just "eat food, a lot of it, mostly protein" (to repurpose Michael Pollan) and find that plenty to fuel a heavy lifting regimen or strength & conditioning program. As long as you're roughly cognizant enough of all three macros such that you don't become tremendously unbalanced, you don't have to track ...


3

Actually there are 2 reasons this is occuring.. #1 let's assume your scale is accurate.. then this means you're losing muscle mass, if you're losing weight but Bodyfat goes up. Bodyfat is a percentage of your total weight, but muscle, fat, and water account for your weight.. so make sure what your losing is actual fat. See below how to. #2 the scale is ...


3

The goal of weight loss is almost always fat loss despite the phrases being used interchangeably by the general public. When you lose weight it isn't always clear what you are losing, but there are some things that you can keep in mind in order to better understand what's going on. The "3500 calorie per pound of fat" model of weight loss isn't perfect and ...


3

A true calorie deficit will ALWAYS result in weight loss, so the short answer to this question is "forever". However, the long answer is going to be more nuanced. See, our bodies don't want us to starve to death so there are compensatory mechanisms that take place to prevent us from rapidly approaching death. These compensatory mechanisms decrease our ...


3

Short answer You're almost doing the right thing, but 15 days is not enough time to start drawing conclusions. Longer answer The problem here is simply that what you lose in such a small amount of time, is for the most part water weight. Fat is persistent, but CICO is the right idea, and you should keep following that. I consume ~ 900-1100 calories ...


3

You have to bulk when your goal is to add muscle to your frame and you lack sufficient fat stores to recomp. It’s that simple. The populations with the greatest capacity to do a body recomposition (simultaneously gaining muscle and losing fat) are new lifters and obese individuals. New lifters can do this because their capacity to add muscle is so high, and ...


3

Lunging, squatting, push ups, some sort of hip hinge (bodyweight good morning for example - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQ2olCTc0-c), bridges, and supermans should be enough to get you started. Toss in some sort of ab routine (side planks, hard style planks, and something to hit your lower abs like kicking your legs out and bringing them back in) and a ...


3

You can experiment to see what level of deprivation negatively impacts performance for you specifically (everyone is different), but in general it is a good idea to take a more modest approach to fat loss the leaner you get. Your metabolic rate will decrease as you get smaller. Why? Because your metabolic rate is dictated by metabolic need and a smaller body ...


3

There are many factors that affect metabolism. Size - The heavier you are, the more calories you burn existing. Also moving at a heavier weight burns more calories than moving at a lower weight. So as you lose weight you'll burn less. Muscle mass uses more energy than fat mass so ultimately you want to try to retain as much muscle as possible. Thermic Effect ...


3

Making sure that your workouts are properly spaced out in the week, and you are taking advantage of the deload weeks, you could probably run 5/3/1 for a long time. This also depends on what sort of 5/3/1 variant you might be following since 5/3/1 is very flexible and more of an approach than an actual program. Nutrition-wise, since you're striving for a body ...


2

So this is a two part answer. Part one: Stop binge eating To stop doing this you need need to understand why you binge eat when you do it. If the problem is that, when you feel stress or discomfort you go to food to feel better, you need to find something to replace the food. Find something else that makes you feel better that you can resort to which isn't ...


2

I think the question you really wanted to ask is: Is it healthier to eat starch-based carbohydrates instead of sugar-based carbohydrates? A good question, because sugar is not equals sugar. Common sugar is saccharose, usually from the sugar cane, consisting of one part of glucose and one part of fructose. Even if you'd ask about saccharose versus glucose, ...


2

Unfortunately, we can't tell you the reason for your knee pain. It may be physical, it may be equipment (poor fitting/worn out shoes, etc) or something else. I would recommend getting with a trainer and/or physical therapist to help figure out the cause. There are many exercises you can do that don't put that kind of stress on the knee, however. Swimming is ...


2

Pain comes from somewhere. You have to understand (and get someone to help you understand) what is causing the pain. Is it something in the ligaments ? Muscles ? Bones ? Is it a muscle imbalance ? Is it simply being unused to exercising ? Should you first go for low impact (e.g. bike) exercises before switching to running ? Should you concurrently strengthen ...


2

The acute increase in Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) observed in response to strength training persists for between 24 and 38 hours, indicating that we would need to train from between 4.5 (or 9 times per fortnight) and 7 days per week in order to maintain this elevated level! The 7% increase observed in this study—9% for men and 4% for women—was not, of ...


2

If you're looking to lose 30lbs I would set that as a 4 month goal. 1,200 calories a day, unless advised by a dietitian or doctor is way too low on calories. The FDA has a website available called MyPlate that would give you a caloric deficit to follow to safely lose weight and keep off the weight based on your age, weight, height, and gender. If you've ...


2

Loose skin and stretch marks are not so much a product of the rate of weight loss, but rather the elasticity or plasticity of the skin when loss or gain occurs. When we gain considerable size, whether through increased muscle or fat bulk, our skin is required to stretch or grow to accommodate the change. If the gain is made slowly, new skin cells will be ...


2

To respond to your question directly, yes, it is always preferable to eat well before considering dietary supplements. And this is especially true of beginners, since it establishes the norms by which we train throughout our careers thereafter. The Australian Institute of Sport and its state equivalents institute a ‘no supplement’ policy for all of their ...


2

First of all, it is always best to first have a healthy diet before taking any supplements. There is no scientific evidence for fat burning supplements, so I should not use those anyway. The best fat burner is creating muscle mass, which will help you increase your metabolism. Increasing your muscle mass will help with a high protein intake, but also here ...


2

Staying healthy and in shape while quarantined is totally doable. First and foremost, you can download many apps that start with workout routines from beginner to an advanced athlete like Nike training club. Also, many athletic and sports equipment companies offer free workout plans through Instagram accounts either live or IGTV. Also, you can have your ...


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