7

No, the knees should not be locked out.* See caveat. The two primary reasons: Once the knees are locked all the weight is transferred directly to the joint, which can be disasterous Not locking out increases the time under tension. * Caveat With appropriate loading and a controlled lift the risk of injury is relatively low. There's two aspects: the joint ...


4

TL;DR: The "technique" consists of two primary things: Keep your head far enough back. Don't start the duck-under too early. The head should be under the bar roughly at the bar's max height before coming out of the squat. IMO looking at the bar is more likely to cause an accident: we hit what we focus on. The bar/head clearance is generally ...


3

Is there just as much benefit to doing exercises "at random times throughout the day" as there is to doing them all in a single workout? Yes, as long as the exercises are similarly difficult. I.e. Say you were working with a weight that you could lift for an absolutely maximum of 10 reps before complete failure. If you did sets of 8 with that ...


2

In the snatch, horizontal motion of the bar must be limited to keep from losing it behind. The hip hinge is usually the cause of most horizontal motion. Keeping the hips low allows the lifter to explode more vertically using the legs as the main driver. Letting your hips shoot up in the pull off the floor can cause too much back engagement and an arched bar ...


1

1: The main cues I recommend is thinking about aligning your hips and shoulders at the end of the pull. Hip extension and knee extension should be simultaneous and your glutes should reach full engagement right before you drop into a receiving position. Try high hang snatches (from the contact point) focusing on fully extending the hips and knees and ...


1

Mike isreatel suggests that 20% to 25% of your usual working voume is enough to maintain your gains. so if you are used to do 10 weekly sets of chest exercises, 2 or 3 will suffice to maintain muscle mass and strength.


1

This is my take: Anterior pelvic tilt (APT) and spinal flexion should be seen as two different things. APT is the movement of the pelvis and it should occur at L4/L5. A common mistake for APT is performing it through the upper lumbar region, common for people with active back extensors. From a biomechanical point of view, APT is necessary to allow your body ...


1

So, I'm curious to know how much anterior and posterior pelvic tilt in heavy squat/deadlift increase the risk of injury according to the actual state of research All researches are either done on spines of dead animals, simulations or theoricrafting+math. Based on your standards of what you consider actual science, those studies might not mean anything at ...


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