8

You do not have "low testosterone" and even if you did, you would build muscle and overall fitness the same way that everyone else does - through training. 350 ng/dL is within a normal range for a 35 year old man, for reference 450 ng/dL is the 50th percentile (the exact middle, neither high nor low). Getting to a healthy bodyfat level will likely ...


7

I bench press once a week I personally would not expect my bench press 1RM to increase past the absolute novice level if I only bench pressed once a week. Consider bench pressing three times a week. I'm not sure I see the value in 12+ rep sets, but otherwise your approach of training different rep ranges (some call it "undulating periodization") sounds ...


6

There's a lot to address here, so I will try to do it step-wise. I started gym 1 year and a half ago, and results are no good, as I do not see progression in shoulders and arms for example.. Usually if you don't see any progression in a certain part of the body, it's simply because the routine you had wasn't conducive to growth in that particular area. ...


6

Slowly. Do hook grip on your first set for a week, and regular grip for your remaining sets. Then do hook grip on your first two sets for a week. Then your first three sets for a week, and so on. It helps if you have a ramp up routine (start with lower weights until you get to your working set) because you can do this scheme with lower weight and build up. ...


6

Yes, this is why the bars used in women's Olympic weightlifting competition have a smaller diameter, of 25mm, rather than the 28mm used for the men's bars. This is intended to allow hook grip despite women typically having shorter fingers than men. (For comparison, bars used in powerlifting typically have a 27mm diameter for a dedicated deadlift bar, or 28-...


6

A program should be switched out when you feel like you're hitting a plateau, and are no longer progressing. If your program doesn't have a "here's what you do if you plateau", then switch it out. As ever, variation is key, which means that unless your program has built-in variation for when progress stagnates, every program is only temporary. It sounds ...


6

Try micro loading, benching 2-3 times a week, and eating more. See if you can find some 1 or 1 1/2 pound plates in these trying times. Speaker magnets work well if you have iron plates and can’t find something to microload with. Unless the weight you’re moving with your other triceps and chest exercises loads the chest and triceps more than the bench ...


5

TL;DR: Try using proper wrist position, check your form, lift for technique, don't overwork an injury. My wrists started hurting when I started weightlifting (about eleven months ago) during bench press and overhead press. I got myself some wrist wraps in the beginning and they helped keep my wrists in the proper position. About two months ago I stopped ...


5

For the purposes of lowering your bodyfat percentage, the only benefit of cardio is an increase on the "energy out" side of the energy balance equation. There are certainly other benefits to cardio, but not for the specific purpose of lowering your bodyfat percentage. Strength training is very useful for lowering your bodyfat percentage as it will bring up ...


5

TL;DR: Strength Training can start as early as 7. Serious weightlifting, power-lifting, body-building should wait until later in puberty (11 to 17) when adolescents have reached physical and skeletal maturity. It seems that most resources I've read are in favor of strength training from a young age. I've read that as soon as kids start doing sports (aged 7 -...


5

Music has the ability to change your heartbeat based on the bass and other rhythms, which is why clubs playing loud bass music get the crowd excited. Screaming or yelling has been shown to increase strength up to 7% too - https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/a19533055/the-sound-that-will-make-you-7-percent-stronger/. So I'm assuming the rapid heartbeat from ...


4

Higher heel elevation means that you can push your knees further forward before reaching the limit of your ankle flexibility. Knees further forward make for a more upright squat. If you're practicing Olympic weightlifting, then you'll generally want your squats to be more upright, since you need to catch the clean with an upright torso. Olympic lifters also ...


4

The quick answer is either "When you've reached the end of the program" or "When you're not longer progressing or your goals change". I don't know anything about the program you're following, so I'm going to address two different types of programs and introduce a concept by Dan John, bus bench and park bench programs. The two different types of programs ...


4

This might be an unsatisfying answer, but the need for specialized equipment is one reason that I don't worry about incline exercises and instead focus on overhead presses and horizontal presses like push-ups or floor and bench press.


4

(In this answer I am only addressing muscle growth.) Muscle growth occurs on a per need basis within certain genetic and environmental parameters. Presenting a challenge to the muscles (typically by training) creates a stimulus for growth. Environmental factors (relative to the muscle tissue) such as stress and nutrition can promote or discourage additional ...


3

First of all, quit the low carb diet and switch to a balanced one (also here). You don't really need to eat anything special before workout, just eat anything that you can easily digest. For muscle growth you could add some protein (albumin and whey protein for example). For weight loss you should avoid fat and sugar. Skipping breakfast is fine too, but it ...


3

So what you're looking for is an answer to the question "is my programming effective?". Programming effectively is a very important part of getting strong, so this is a good thing to be asking. My hunch from looking at your program is "no, there's not enough training volume and there's too much intensity". But... it's complex. TLDR I would advise you to ...


3

I had this problem too. Let it rest. I also didn't want to stop training, I had a big momentum, so I bought wrist hooks for deadlift, to be able to keep training and go around the wrist injury, but other people were more sane and they told me just to stop lifting for some time. "There is so much other exercise you can do in the meantime (legs, abdomen etc.)" ...


3

Do chin ups and pull ups on a bar with a larger than normal diameter. This will make it slightly difficult to grip the bar while you try to lift your body weight.


3

when doing a bicep curl, the load is low at the bottom and the top. You're making some good points about how parts of the rep (specifically where the moment arm is parallel to the force of gravity) are a lot lighter. Maximal load occurs when the moment arm is perpendicular to the direction of resistance. So if you're doing a barbell curl, this would be the ...


3

This is true, mostly for bicep curls in fact. This is why dumbbell 21's, and 28's were created by old school bodybuilders to have a higher time under tension. More on that later, but there is a way to increase the torque you describe.. Resistance bands(both single bands and ones that come in loops) These have more resistance the more you stretch them. You ...


3

This is one of the advantages of machines over free weights, especially for bicep curls, tricep extensions, and the analogous leg exercises. They generally have some sort of cable or belt attached to the weight stack, going up through a pulley, and then coming back to wrap around a disk-like track. When you perform the exercise, you are applying force on a ...


3

I've had this problem and overcame it to some extent. Here are some things that helped. Post-workout stretching. I never stretched after lifting, but I found that it was helpful on leg days. At the end of leg day I spend about 5 minutes stretching out quads, hamstrings, calved, hip flexors, and just stretching into a deep squat for about 30 seconds. I think ...


3

The short answer is yes. We think calorie timing affects muscle vs fat gain. But the questions of how much it affects it is more important. Mike Israetel mentions that for most of us the amount of calories is much more important,for us hobby builders. In contradiction this study (3:20) suggested fasted cardio is not really beneficial. My personal ...


3

Obviously, you should make sure you're warmed up before attempting any of these. Answer 1: I can do you one better, I'll give you full body training in 4 minutes! Enter, the tabata protocol (thank me later). Honestly, Dan John does a much better job of explaining it than I can. I believe he now only recommends front squats, so I'll use that as an example (...


3

In this pandemic-based home workout era, anything goes for me. Yesterday, I did incline dumbbell chest press while sitting in my office chair with it reclined. This was my more successful attempt. Previously, I was sitting on the floor against a couch with a small pillow behind my back. So far, I've found that I like decline pushup more. I've got a lot more ...


3

The stabilization argument is only one of several in favor of free weights, and it has been narrowed in the public consciousnessness to a facsimile of itself. The point is not entirely about "stabilizer muscles", but about developing yourself as a person who can do things. The argument for using free weights rather than a machine is that you learn ...


2

partial reps can only give partial results at best and in some cases such as with squats can cause damage by putting stress on the knees without engaging the muscles that a full range of motion (just below parallel) squat is meant to strengthen. Rather than doing partial reps it would be best to focus on proper form with lower weights. When following a ...


2

@yake84 I experience neck pain myself, but not headaches. Gwendolene Jull is the expert on neck pain and cerviogenic headaches. Listen to her here. I encourage you to read her scholarly research articles. Now, I'm going to throw out a topic that is worth thinking about: There is quite a bit of interest in the relationship between co-contraction and neck ...


2

Welcome to my world! Like you I'm in my thirties (okay so it's more late thirties these days) and I have osteoarthritis in my neck (C1 -> C7), and I know all too well the headaches that come with it! What has worked for me is Yoga - I do a "full" (1hr+) practice perhaps two-three times a week but do gentle neck rolls and side neck stretches at least daily - ...


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