24

The article's explanations for why you shouldn't try to squat a deadlift are wrong. Positioning your hips too low does not put more stress on the lower back, and does not meaningfully shift your centre of gravity. What it does do is position your shoulders behind the bar, meaning to maintain this position as the bar comes off the floor, your anterior ...


10

The term you are looking for is using a 'spotter', and it is true that bench press can be dangerous, but deaths on it are very rare even for people that work out alone. There are several techniques you can use to bench safer alone. This being said, you should know your limits before lifting alone or use safety bars as shown in the picture below. When ...


10

There are two goals to aim for when distributing your weight: You should be in balance, for obvious reasons; and The combined centre of mass of your body and the bar should only move down and up during the squat, not forwards or backward, as forwards or backwards movement would cause lost efficiency. Keeping your weight over the centres of your feet ...


9

The factors limiting how much one can lift in the snatch vs the clean and jerk are different. A snatch attempt will be failed if either of the following occur: the bar is not pulled high enough for the lifter to get under it, or the lifter fails to catch the bar with enough stability that they can stand up. A clean and jerk attempt will be failed if any of ...


8

We need to clarify some terms. "Extension" means movement of a joint which increases the angle between two body parts. So elbow extension is the movement that increases the angle between the humerus and radius/ulna, i.e. straightening the elbow. The opposite of extension is "flexion", which is a movement of a joint which decreases the ...


7

If the question is really, "do I have to lift heavy weights", then the answer is "no", and I, the designated random person on the internet, give you permission not to lift heavy weights. If the question is "is heavy lifting overrated" or "doesn't heavy lifting suffer from these drawbacks", the answer to both is kind of ...


7

Your machine uses mechanical advantage (or disadvantage) to multiply the resistance of the stack. The machine presumably has a pulley system. Pulleys can multiply or divide the load that they are acting on, trading off against pulling distance. So for example, you can set up a pulley system to lift a 200lb weight with only 100lb of force acting on the other ...


7

He isn't. If you tried to grab a bar in that position, you just wouldn't be able to, physics would object. Even your first picture, I'd argue that he's not exactly "balanced" as I believe you mean it. The snatch is a very explosive lift, it essentially goes from pulling a weight off the floor, to jumping with it, to catching it in a squat position, ...


6

Short answer: you don't actually need to flare your knees out, but what you do need to do is generate torque in your hips which can be accomplished by attempting to rotate forward-facing feet outward ("screwing your feet into the ground") and thinking of this as pointing your knees out is a good physical cue. Details: The reason you externally ...


6

It's quite normal to re-experience DOMS after a few weeks off. The "best" way to return after deloading is pretty much to do as much as you feel is appropriate. It sounds vague, I know, but there can't exist a one-size-fits-all answer. We're all different. The old clichée holds true; "listen to your body". If you're in pain, back off. If ...


6

There are no magic solutions. Lift heavy, do your cardio (both intense and not), and maintain high protein intake. How much you eat in order to achieve your goal of faster muscle gain is up to you. Consider that you seem to be chasing two rabbits by wanting both fat loss and "faster" muscle gain. I'm not saying it's impossible but be careful with ...


6

The purpose of the hip flexors are to lift the legs when walking or running. The purpose of the hip extensors are to lift the whole body when walking or running. Since the whole body is a lot heavier than the legs; the hip extensors need to be a lot stronger than the hip flexors. When standing there is a certain tension in the glutes and hamstrings (and abs)....


6

I've seen plenty of leg routines based entirely (or almost entirely) on squats and deadlifts. My simple question is this routine is balanced. This question seems to depend on the assumption that it is a problem if an exercise routine is not "balanced", in that it trains antagonistic muscles equally. That isn't the case at all. Yes, leg routines ...


5

According to a meta-analysis (i.e. a scientific study of scientific studies), it does not matter: In conclusion, there is strong evidence that resistance training frequency does not significantly or meaningfully impact muscle hypertrophy when volume is equated. Thus, for a given training volume, individuals can choose a weekly frequency per muscle groups ...


5

This is simultaneously an easy problem and a hard problem. The easy part is that it sounds like you're a novice without other training to work around. Programming for novices is easy. Many times an off-the-shelf program is sufficient. (The hardest part about this is finding a program that suits your goal. You're right that many so-called "strength" ...


5

The erector spinae muscles (iliocostalis, longissimus and spinalis) extend the back. In the back extension exercise they work isometrically to maintain an extended back against gravity that tries to flex the back. In the back extension exercise the glutes (gluteus maximus) and the hamstrings (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris) works ...


5

Shoulder blade retraction is not the same thing as either upper back rounding/thoracic flexion or bridging/lumbar and thoracic extension. The shoulder blades move independently of the thoracic spine, so you can have either scapular retraction or protraction occurring in any combination with thoracic flexion or extension. The Stronglifts description of the ...


5

Per Catalyst Athletics, the front rack position (whether for a clean, jerk, or a front squat) should be as follows: The shoulders need to be elevated slightly and protracted (shoulders pushed forward) typically as much as is possible. Understand that scapular position and the curve of the thoracic spine are not the same thing, although it’s natural to round ...


5

The bar above the front delts at the bottom makes flare the elbows and cause shoulder impingement. Why isn't it a problem at the top (where the bar is above the shoulders)? It's not only debatable whether the "guillotine" style bench press, in which the bar is lowered straight down over the collarbones, causes shoulder impingement, but the very ...


4

Combining strength training with cardio in the same workout is sub-optimal. Each modality reduces the effective stimulus of the other by some significant but relatively minor fraction. It's important not to misinterpret that statement, because it does not mean that combining them is "bad" or "stupid" or makes the workout "worthless&...


4

You should be sitting "down" rather than "back" in a front squat. "Sit back" is a cue used in powerlifting for the low-bar style squat, especially in equipped powerlifting, where using maximal hip flexion (and hence strong forward lean of the torso) and minimal forward knee travel helps get the most assistance out of the lifter'...


4

Running can conflict with muscle gain if your heart rate remains too elevated. If you want to lose the fat while gaining lean tissue. Cardio should be performed below your first ventilatory threshold. That means you should be able to speak comfortably while performing cardio. And so this for 30 to 60 minutes, as often as you can. I do either fast walking or ...


4

Firstly, the bar does not need to be over the midfoot for your balance to be over your midfoot. Instead, the combined centre of mass of the bar and the lifter's body needs to be over the midfoot, which means if the centre of mass of the lifter's body is in front of the midfoot (such as if they're leaning forwards), then the bar actually needs to be behind ...


4

The overhead press can be performed either with a curved bar path and little body movement, or a more vertical bar path and more body movement. These can be considered two different lifts. In the overhead press, the bar starts in front of the shoulders, and ends directly above the shoulders. This means that if the lifter is standing upright, the bar must ...


4

First, it should be noted that while hook grip is almost ubiquitous in the clean, Olympic lifters generally change their grip after completing the clean, and do not actually keep the hook grip in place for the jerk. You can clearly see this in this video of Aleksey Torokhtiy performing a 230kg clean and jerk, from around the 1:35 mark, as the bar comes up ...


4

Shoulders internal rotation is seen in many exercises (bench press, pull ups, barbell row etc) as the devil, whilst external rotation is suggested without limits. It should be noted that this isn't because internal rotation is uniquely causative of shoulder impingement. It's just that reaching the limits of shoulder rotation during weight training is much ...


4

Generally, any lifting program with progressive overload will produce hypertrophy in some manner. It is impossible to state whether or not this (or any exercise) will produce hypertrophy without effort and progression details. I recommend you read the "Types Of Muscle Hypertrophy" and "Training Variables And Muscle Hypertrophy" of the ...


3

Yes, full range of motion resistance training can increase flexibility. Morton, S. K., Whitehead, J. R., Brinkert, R. H., & Caine, D. J. (2011). Resistance Training vs. Static Stretching: Effects on Flexibility and Strength. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 25(12), 3391–3398. https://doi.org/10.1519/jsc.0b013e31821624aa Leite, T. B., Costa, ...


3

An efficient squatter mainly uses the glutes to extend the hips, not the hamstrings. As can be seen from this image the hamstrings crosses both the hip and knee joint: They therefore have two functions: extending the hips and flexing the knee. If you use the hamstrings to extend the hips in the squat you also get a flexing torque at the knee. This means ...


3

If you want a guide to lift a heavy object from the ground (or close to the ground) to around shoulder height, I would say you more want to look at the stone lifting in strongman training than something from the Olympic lifts. Firstly, the power clean isn't a deadlift > upright row > rack > overhead press, though it might appear that way at first ...


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