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1

Personal experience of mine and others, with what research I could find: https://gymjunkies.com/zercher-squat-101/ Biceps tears are much more common than elbow injuries, but you can prevent these; explained below: First let me tell you how to correctly perform one as there are two ways: with your hands holding each other and your arms crossed with your ...


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The other thing that newbies can do is to do weight training on a M-W-F basis, and then do cardio on three of the remaining days, with one final day to completely relax. For best results, the cardio should not rely heavily on muscles that were worked on the previous day; just get the heart up to 80%-85% of your max, keep it there for 20 minutes, and then ...


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You can train every day. In 1 month of training just push ups I gained an initial 3 inches of muscle on my chest circumference which cooled down to 2 inches after a few weeks of not training (pump, water, glycogen, fat redistribution, whatever). Years later it's still where it was before. All I did was do push ups every 15 - 60 minutes according to the Evil ...


1

I've recently looked into this as well. Same disclaimer as you, plus I'm not even any type of engineer. Safety wise, and rack issues aside, your numbers seem low to me (but I can't say with any certainty). From what I understand you need to calculate force of impact for this type of problem: force = (mass * gravity * height) / distance e.g. (500 x 9.81 x 2 ) ...


2

This has been answered already but I haven't seen anyone mention this... I'd like to add that beginner's bodies are not adapted physically yet to training stimulus, so you only want to train just enough to cause muscular damage/stress and recover, allowing for strength/hypertrophy, etc.. Working out by using one compound movement for each functional plane of ...


8

If a novice wants to do more than 3x/week, is it detrimental to his progress? Possibly, yes. The main factor is not whether 6x/week hurts, but that 3x/week works. Nothing is as proven in the amateur sports field as 3x/week training plans, be it in the space of weight training, running, or basically everything. If so, why? Doing a physical activity once ...


18

As well as physical burnout, as addressed in Thomas's answer, a 3/week routine helps deal with mental burnout. I believe the GMB people wrote an article that's a bit more detailed (I can't access it on this computer/network), but essentially, doing three workouts a week not only gives you a chance to do other things on your off evenings, but it makes it less ...


14

You have to find a compromise between how often you want to train, and how quickly you can recover. There is nothing magic about a 3/week full body program. 3/week just happens to be a good frequency for managing fatigue and recovery on a full body program. It gives you one, one, and two days off between workouts, which allows for adequate workout-to-workout ...


3

When the weights don't come in small enough increments, one good option is to vary the reps. I particularly like this approach with weighted dips, but it works for all sorts of exercises, especially upper body pressing. A program aiming for "medium weight, 3 sets of 10 reps a few times a week" depends on sets of 10 and changes the weight to ...


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You will easily see progress in strength working up to 50 reps. I actually workout and do different things so I know. Isee people not making progress or very slowly, and it generally boils down to not enough intensity, volume, frequency and conditioning. Intensity does not only mean weight by the way. God I hate how hijacked fitness jargon is. All you have ...


5

In this scenario, I would look at approaching linear progression with a different metric, perhaps with reps instead of weight. The following is an example of implementing the "Double Progression Method". You're moving from 30 lb x 10 to 35 lb x 10 but that's too big of a jump, you can try 30 lb x 11. If you compare total volume, you're at 300, ...


3

A case against one-arm handstand pushups I would definitely discourage even thinking about a one-arm handstand pushup as something that goes along with a one-arm pullup. It's not on the same level. Not even close. As a climber, the one-arm pullup is a staple. It's not the case that every climber can do it, but it's a common "feat of strength" that ...


5

To simplify matters let us ignore the weight of the body. In this case the barbell must be placed directly over the pressure point of the groundforces on the foot. The groundforces are in fact distributed over the feet with varying pressure (red: high pressure): However in a mechanical analysis these distributed forces may be replaced by a single force ...


2

The idea that a posterior pelvic tilt in a hip thrust will increase glute activation is a myth promoted by YouTube gurus who try to get attention by adding bells and whistles to exercises. This study finds that the pelvic tilt approach, which is called the American Hip Thrust, does not increase the activation of your glutes. The lead author of the above ...


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