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1

The fact that you put on ~25lbs over the last two years should already debunk the idea that you're inhibited from building mass, not only does the article you looked at confirm this but you have own real results to refute that idea. So, if not your IGF-1 levels what might be slowing you down more now? A couple of things could be happening: have you ...


0

First of all, in Eastern Europe children are doing weightlifting under strict surveillance. They are never alone in the gym, but an experienced weightlifting coach is always present and corrects them for errors immediately. Also they don't use a lot of weights but they learn perfect movements and it actually looks very nice. It's more like technique training ...


1

Taking a completely different tact from the other answers, I think your exercise selection is excellent. In fact, I'd drop the explosive press-ups and keep the others. I'd like to point you towards my favourite strength and conditioning author, Dan John. He talks about a program called "One Lift a Day". Essentially, and for some reason a lot of people ...


2

Here are a list of exercises you can do for each muscle group: Chest- floor press, chest press flys(take two weights, press them together with your palms, and raise your arms out in front of you 90 degrees. Use your chest to keep the weights together and raise them) Quads- squats, front squats, barbell lunges Hams -deadlift, hack lift Glutes -deadlift, ...


5

TL;DR: Strength Training can start as early as 7. Serious weightlifting, power-lifting, body-building should wait until later in puberty (11 to 17) when adolescents have reached physical and skeletal maturity. It seems that most resources I've read are in favor of strength training from a young age. I've read that as soon as kids start doing sports (aged 7 -...


1

The youngest I've seen was a 6 year old girl who did Olympic weightlifting and could lift more than an average teenage boy.That being said she was very well supervised. Weightlifting consists of thousands of exercises.. 90% of them you can't screw up or injure yourselves.. such as bicep curls or lunges. If you're that worried you can stick to dumbbell and ...


1

As for a beginner, I'd suggest you do both: Cardio and strength all-in-one! This can be achieved on the spinning bike (by increasing its resistance), on the step machine or on the rowing machine. Also, hill climbing (essentially running upwards) is considered cardio and strength as well, just read my post about hill climbing here.


2

partial reps can only give partial results at best and in some cases such as with squats can cause damage by putting stress on the knees without engaging the muscles that a full range of motion (just below parallel) squat is meant to strengthen. Rather than doing partial reps it would be best to focus on proper form with lower weights. When following a ...


2

As mentioned by @DeeV, 4 reps at an 8 RPE is essentially your 6 RM. Using this idea, we can take a look at the table "Estimated Reps at Percent of 1 Repetition Maximum" to get a good starting point. This table states that an estimate for the true 6 RM is between 82 - 85% of the 1 RM. Another resource from Reactive Training Systems is the following chart: ...


2

I would say that it's basically saying "4 reps at your 6 rep max weight". You should have enough experience to know what that is if you're moving on to an RPE training program. Because you're probably not your strongest every training day, you probably want to aim for a weight that you can do 2-4 reps. So start with your 6 rep max and drop it a little for ...


2

The biggest factor to keep in mind is that a belt is for your abs to brace against, not to support your lower back. Your spine is kept stable by the additional intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) you can generate by bracing against the belt. My personal approach is to pull it just about as tight as it can comfortably go and then back it off another notch. This ...


1

I always tighten my belt that I can stick 1 or 2 fingers between belt and body. As commented opinions are divided about it, but all agree it works. As by the link in the comment, first few months dont use a belt, as your body wont train some muscles as it should (with deadlifting your back wont know how to keep itself steady if you ever lift without a belt)....


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