Hot answers tagged

8

Just to get this out of the way Probably one of the most commonly uttered phrases around here, but it can't be said often enough: A flat belly is made in the kitchen, not in the gym. It doesn't matter how strong your core is; if it's covered in a thick layer of fat, no one will see it. And ab workouts do NOT burn belly-fat specifically. See: Is spot ...


3

Being a beginner, it is quite common to become breathless before failure - especially on compound exercises. The thing with compound, is that you're not only using a single muscle group but the whole chain of movement - which means that in a squat your focus could be on glutes and quads, but your core, back, hamstrings, calves are also doing the work. ...


3

You need to build muscle, there's no way around it. Building muscle is a long term process and commitment. If in your pursuit to build muscle you accumulate more fat than you are comfortable with, just cut for a little while and you'll be fine. Losing fat is a relatively super quick process compared to building muscle. A man might spend years, or even his ...


3

First things first To start off, I'm going to try to address some of your thoughts that look like you might have bought into some myths. It's important to get those out of the way first and foremost, not to criticize but rather so we're on the same page. I've always wanted to try lifting but given my body type and height, I've always been scared of bulking. ...


2

Disclaimer: I don't know what scapular winging is, and if you think you have an actual physical issue that prevents this movement, check with a medical expert. This movement involves two main contractions. Of course neither is isolated, but at different parts of the move, different muscles are the primary mover. The first primary contraction is from your ...


2

Yes, it is considered healthy. According to this study, even taking a few dozens of steps will improve your fitness, at least for men. Furthermore, according to this study, several minutes of stair climbing will improve your health even more: "We know that sprint interval training works, but we were a bit surprised to see that the stair snacking ...


2

There's a couple scenarios behind this.. I think the first 3 are the most likely..: Hypertrophy(muscle gain) does not equal strength. In fact, it's possible to lose muscle while gaining strength, and gaining muscle while losing strength. It all depends on your workout, how many reps are you doing and what is your workout like? Adaptation. If you do the ...


2

Best advice I have for a diet beginner is to keep it separate (& simple). Though nutrition and exercise go hand-in-hand, I advise my clients starting out on a new diet plan, to keep it separate from their workout goals. It’s been established that losing fat is math; you MUST be in a caloric deficit to lose fat. Because of this, diet and exercise are ...


1

The way we breathe during intense and moderate intensity exercise is one of the most important things we can tune into. Some doctors will say that your breathing is a function of your autonomous nervous system and leave it at that. However you must learn to take control of your breathe. Controlling your breathe has numerous benefits. It allows you to ...


1

I want to start off with the first of two scenarios, either you're having health issues due to imbalance, or you aren't but just want to make sure... I want to start off with the most obvious, which is if you have signs of muscle asymmetries such as rounded shoulders, back pain, tight muscles such as tight hamstrings, limited mobility or flexibility, lower ...


1

I’ve taken at least 2 weeks off in the 3-4 weeks and don’t push myself to particular hard exercises. When I take every other week off and don't push myself hard, I expect to stagnate or get weaker. This is especially true if my "on" weeks might only have 2 workouts. If you want more results, put in more work.


1

Carbohydrate intake will certainly affect your training, as compared with the fasting state. To provide a personal anecdote, if one of my athletes was struggling to perform during her morning session, it was invariably because she had not eaten, and she would simply be unable to complete the workout with the intensity that we were expecting. I would send her ...


1

There could be multiple things to look at, but to answer your question, yes.. everyone exercising needs to take a break. The more experienced you are, the more often you take breaks. Typically this "deload" is 9 to 14 days and can include your rest days so that it just feels like a week off. Generally this is done every 6 to 8 weeks. After a deload, it's not ...


1

I understand your feelings completely as I have a much more severe case of pectus carinatum than you. I was bullied at school and became deeply depressed for years. I was always worried about how my chest looked with clothes on and off and what a girl might say if they touched my chest. Some thought it was hard muscle, which I would feel shame about anyway ...


1

The literature consistently reports values of around 1.5-1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body mass per day (g/kg/d) as being optimal for endurance, strength, and power athletes—with up to 2.0 g/kg/d being recommended for ultra-endurance and multi-sport athletes, or athletes in significant energy deficit. The latter figure is appropriate when training ...


1

After a few different experiences, I've found that a sport watch really made the difference for me. The main benefits I received: I can run lighter, without having to carry my phone in an armband or similar As others have said, it can be waterproof, and some allow you to track many sports as swimming, cycling, skiing but even football etc. It's usually also ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible