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10

There are two goals to aim for when distributing your weight: You should be in balance, for obvious reasons; and The combined centre of mass of your body and the bar should only move down and up during the squat, not forwards or backward, as forwards or backwards movement would cause lost efficiency. Keeping your weight over the centres of your feet ...


8

We need to clarify some terms. "Extension" means movement of a joint which increases the angle between two body parts. So elbow extension is the movement that increases the angle between the humerus and radius/ulna, i.e. straightening the elbow. The opposite of extension is "flexion", which is a movement of a joint which decreases the ...


7

He isn't. If you tried to grab a bar in that position, you just wouldn't be able to, physics would object. Even your first picture, I'd argue that he's not exactly "balanced" as I believe you mean it. The snatch is a very explosive lift, it essentially goes from pulling a weight off the floor, to jumping with it, to catching it in a squat position, ...


6

Firstly, moving your scapulae through a full range of motion in a pull-up will not work the muscles responsible for elevating the scapulae (i.e. upper traps and levator scapulae), as gravity does the work of scapular elevation during a hang. It's only the muscles responsible for scapular depression (pec minor, lat dorsi) that will be worked. The rhomboids ...


6

Short answer: No. As an exercise they are sub-par, and as a workout they don't even qualify. But we can tweak it, and add to it, in order to reach our goals. I agree with the article author's decision to not include situps. To elaborate, we have to take into account the fact that situps have some very serious limitations. Core vs. abs A "core workout&...


6

Short answer: you don't actually need to flare your knees out, but what you do need to do is generate torque in your hips which can be accomplished by attempting to rotate forward-facing feet outward ("screwing your feet into the ground") and thinking of this as pointing your knees out is a good physical cue. Details: The reason you externally ...


6

The purpose of the hip flexors are to lift the legs when walking or running. The purpose of the hip extensors are to lift the whole body when walking or running. Since the whole body is a lot heavier than the legs; the hip extensors need to be a lot stronger than the hip flexors. When standing there is a certain tension in the glutes and hamstrings (and abs)....


6

I've seen plenty of leg routines based entirely (or almost entirely) on squats and deadlifts. My simple question is this routine is balanced. This question seems to depend on the assumption that it is a problem if an exercise routine is not "balanced", in that it trains antagonistic muscles equally. That isn't the case at all. Yes, leg routines ...


5

Shoulder blade retraction is not the same thing as either upper back rounding/thoracic flexion or bridging/lumbar and thoracic extension. The shoulder blades move independently of the thoracic spine, so you can have either scapular retraction or protraction occurring in any combination with thoracic flexion or extension. The Stronglifts description of the ...


5

The bar above the front delts at the bottom makes flare the elbows and cause shoulder impingement. Why isn't it a problem at the top (where the bar is above the shoulders)? It's not only debatable whether the "guillotine" style bench press, in which the bar is lowered straight down over the collarbones, causes shoulder impingement, but the very ...


4

The first picture is a more accurate depiction of a proper rack position (i.e., over the eyes). The reason for beginning with your eyes under the bar isn't because it's easier to unrack (it's arguably more difficult). The primary reason is to allow full range of motion throughout each rep. When you bench press, you should create a "J" curve; ...


4

Can you help me understand how they actually work? They are used to help stabilize the wrist to prevent hyperextension and to support the wrist. When worn properly they apply pressure around the wrist pushing it towards a neutral position. Some of them told me that they do this by keeping the wrist in a more neutral position (which I think is false, since ...


4

Firstly, the bar does not need to be over the midfoot for your balance to be over your midfoot. Instead, the combined centre of mass of the bar and the lifter's body needs to be over the midfoot, which means if the centre of mass of the lifter's body is in front of the midfoot (such as if they're leaning forwards), then the bar actually needs to be behind ...


4

Per Catalyst Athletics, the front rack position (whether for a clean, jerk, or a front squat) should be as follows: The shoulders need to be elevated slightly and protracted (shoulders pushed forward) typically as much as is possible. Understand that scapular position and the curve of the thoracic spine are not the same thing, although it’s natural to round ...


4

First, it should be noted that while hook grip is almost ubiquitous in the clean, Olympic lifters generally change their grip after completing the clean, and do not actually keep the hook grip in place for the jerk. You can clearly see this in this video of Aleksey Torokhtiy performing a 230kg clean and jerk, from around the 1:35 mark, as the bar comes up ...


4

Shoulders internal rotation is seen in many exercises (bench press, pull ups, barbell row etc) as the devil, whilst external rotation is suggested without limits. It should be noted that this isn't because internal rotation is uniquely causative of shoulder impingement. It's just that reaching the limits of shoulder rotation during weight training is much ...


4

If I was experiencing pain in the bench press, I would aim to fix the problem, while only temporarily employing alternative exercises for chest hypertrophy. Firstly, to answer your question, alternative exercises for chest hypertrophy would include chest flies (with dumbbells or cables), plus the push-ups and dips that you've already mentioned. However if ...


3

There are no clear edges between "beginner" and "intermediate" and "advanced". My vague definitions would be these. "Beginner" = fast progress, light to medium weight, lots of flexibility work needed even to do lifts correctly, lots of accessory lifts to strengthen subsidiary muscles "Intermediate" = progress ...


3

That website's contention for why a thumbless grip lessens the load on the forearm muscles is that it prevents you from squeezing the bar: in a thumbless grip, also known as a “false” or “suicide” grip, the thumb is held under or outside of the bar rather than around the bar. There is no squeezing involved. However this absolutely would not apply to any ...


3

I'm curious if a typical linear periodization rep scheme would work better or if I should change reps each week and make it weekly undulating periodization TLDR: You will likely gain strength faster with undulating periodization, at least for a while. There seems to be no difference with hypertrophy, so if strength is your goal, it is definitely worth a ...


3

Unlike the knees, the hips don't really "lock" - upright femurs are the limit of range of motion of the knees, but an upright torso is not the limit of the range of motion of the hips. So the idea that it is crucial to "lock" the hips doesn't make sense. Powerlifting rules are usually simply that in the squat, the lifter must return to an ...


3

An efficient squatter mainly uses the glutes to extend the hips, not the hamstrings. As can be seen from this image the hamstrings crosses both the hip and knee joint: They therefore have two functions: extending the hips and flexing the knee. If you use the hamstrings to extend the hips in the squat you also get a flexing torque at the knee. This means ...


3

Like most areas of fitness, it's pretty easy to find conflicting advice. That said, I think most would agree that keeping the bar as close as possible to the legs on the way up allows you to lift more weight, but that actually hitting your shins or knees can hurt, and may also be suboptimal due to introducing friction between the bar and your legs. Keeping ...


3

"Don't internally rotate the shoulder during these exercises" is not the same as "never internally rotate your shoulder". There are clear uses for internal rotation of the shoulder in sport and life: punching, swimming, throwing, reaching, and many more. The misunderstanding here may be that internal rotation is a common mistake that ...


2

Imagine the pushup like a bench press, where you do NOT bump the weights together at the top. Think of it more like a bench press with a bar, if you will. So you don't get the triangular motions, because your hands are always a fixed width apart. It looks like you've more or less correctly pointed out that the pectoral muscles are involved in adduction, ...


2

All resistance exercise involves forces being applied to the body in two distinct positions, with the forces acting in opposite directions. In any standing weighted exercise (squat, overhead pressing, deadlifts, etc), there is a downward force applied to the body by the weight, and an opposing upward force applied to the soles of the feet by the floor. It's ...


2

This is kind of a debated topic from what I have found online, but it seems better for shoulder/scapular health to start depressed, rather than dynamically adding weight(using full ROM). from topic boards on different fitness websites, it's not bad to use the ROM and avoid depressing shoulders, but depressing shoulders will avoid overactive traps, help ...


2

One major difference between the barbell squat and the Smith machine squat is how far you can bring your feet in front. With the barbell, there is only one position—feet directly under the bar. In contrast, the Smith machine follows a fixed path, thereby removing the need to balance it, so you can bring your feet out to various distances. The article that ...


2

First question: is the choice of working in the scapular plane made to reduce shoulder impingement (like in lateral raises)? If it is, can you explain me why? Does having a 30 degree angle between the elbows and the frontal plane creates space between the humerous and the AC joint for the rotator cuff tissues? No, it's nonsense, seemingly made up by the ...


2

I see that you have multiple questions. I can't help you with all of them, but I can help with the main question you have i.e. avoiding shoulder issues when overhead pressing. I have supraspinatous tendinosis on my right shoulder from strain and bad form. Thanks to this, I can tell when any exercise I'm doing has bad form, because my shoulder pain ...


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