I have been doing this program for quite some time now. There is a bit of progress in terms of technique but my body seems to be unchanged for the past 3 months.

In other terms I do progress a little on my ability to execute my program but I still look pretty average.

This is my program: Training 3-4 days a week (4 now but it used to be 3)

Day 1, 2 and 3:

3 sets:

10 chinups

50 sec wall sit

30 reversed dips (18kg)

30 squats (18kg raised above head when going up)

20 push ups

10 pull-ups (I fail at this on my third set can do maybe 4 and then I'll have to stop and do two more etc)

10 hanging leg raises

10 upside down shoulder press

Abs:

30 crunches

30 bicycle c.

30 toe touches

20 reversed abs

15 side plank hip lifts right

30 crunches

15 side plank hip lifts left

40 russian twists

30 bicycle crunches

15 oblique v-ups right

20 reversed crunches

15 oblique v-ups left

20 leg raises

Plus 30 minutes running

On my fourth day I usually do some technicals (hand stands or typewriter pull-ups or head banger pull ups) and 1 hour jogging @ 11 km/h

In my days off I try to do 100 push-ups (2 sets of 50)

I don't take any substances. Sometimes I eat a protein bar. I drink once a week. Any idea on why I look average and why I can't see any gains or lose the fat on my abs?

UPDATE: I have not started practicing sport 3 months ago. I have an athletic body and looking to reduce my body fat to 7-8% while keeping the muscle mass intact. I have been doing this particular routine for the past 2.5 months now. I started 9 months ago from not being able to do any pull-ups or chin-ups. It just feels like lately (for the past 3 months) I do not see the same progress as I saw in the first 6 months. I also feel tired and sometimes dizzy in the gym. Would anyone recommend using fat burners to lose the last 4-5% body fat?

  • 3
    You're plateauing because you have no variety in your routine, and you're not losing belly fat because you're not in a caloric deficit. You look average because your training program isn't challenging enough. If such a simple program gave great physiques, everyone would be shredded! Go back to the basics. Don't create your own program, but find one that is made by someone who knows their stuff, such as Starting Strength or Stronglifts5x5. – Alec Sep 13 at 0:03
  • That program is not made by me and I eat 2.2k calories per day with closely watched macros. I'm also vegan so it's mostly healthy cooked food. I'm 5.9 and 78 kg – Question Mark Sep 13 at 0:05
  • 1
    Doesn't matter who the program was made by. I could have told you beforehand that it wouldn't give any big results, and now you've proven that it doesn't. So why stick to it? Find something better! – Alec Sep 13 at 0:08
  • How do you track progresd in technique? How do you track changes to your body? Is this just your opinion or do you have metrics to back it up? Because if not start tracking (3 months is too little time, perhaps 6 months is a good time frame). Otherwise this is meaningless – Raditz_35 Sep 13 at 6:11
  • at the moment progress in technique it's just my ability to do correct clean reps (I usually fail miserably for pull ups). metrics yeah I keep track of measurements such as biceps circumference, neck, chest, abs, bum, thighs, weight, bodyfat. – Question Mark Sep 19 at 13:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, working out for 3 months is a very short amount of time to notice significant differences, so there might be changes to your body that you haven't noticed. You might have become stronger without it showing yet, you might have become faster without you noticing it during your workouts.

Secondly, if you want to look good, because I think that's the type of progress you're referring to in your question, food is a huge deal. You should atleast have a balanced diet and some sort of target as to how many calories you need to either lose fat or gain muscle.

Thirdly, switching up your routine is an important key to improving your fitness or physique. If you've been doing the same workout for 3 days a week for 3 months in a row, you might want to change that up. I would suggest doing different workout every day of the week and changing those around every few weeks. (every 6 to 8 weeks is a good start)

You can do this in the way of incorporating new exercises, changing up the order in which you're doing the exercises you're doing and switching around the weight/amount of reps you're doing per set.

If you have more questions let me know, I'm happy to help.

  • Can you recommend me a good full body workout. Also, I'm at a point in my life when my company pays for my food so I try to spend as much as possible because why not so I'm not really willing to do meal prep (also I tried once and failed miserably - I am not an amazing chef) however, I do not have an unbalanced diet and I do keep track of my kcal. I have also calculated my BMR and I know it's around 2700 and I've cut 500 out of it. I lose fat from other parts of my body but not from my abs and hips (cause shit genetics I guess). I don't eat sweets or sodas and avoid sugars in general. – Question Mark Sep 19 at 13:04

You're plateauing because you have no variety in your routine, and you're not losing belly fat because you're not in a caloric deficit. You look average because your training program isn't challenging enough. If such a simple program gave great physiques, everyone would be shredded!

Additionally, if you can do 20+ reps of something, stop doing it that way. Find a way to add resistance or make the exercise more challenging. At 20+, you're not really training strength any more, but rather endurance.

Go back to the basics. I can't speak too deeply here, but I would criticize whomever made that program. Find one that is made by someone who knows their stuff, such as Starting Strength or Stronglifts5x5.

  • I do not want to do weights training and I am aiming for endurance (my goal is 100 pull ups and chin ups in 1 go until June next year) – Question Mark Sep 13 at 0:08
  • I don't want to be too harsh here, but if you only increase in the number of reps, and never in the intensity of the lift, then you will never have anything but an average-looking physique. You're training endurance and not strength, and high-endurance muscles look very different from high-strength muscles. You will see this by looking at a top marathon runner, and comparing it to a top sprinter. – Alec Sep 13 at 0:11
  • There seems to be many issues with your answer. First of all I think that program is pretty challenging. I personally believe it is more of a nutritional problem than a problem with my routine. I do agree that there isn't much variety in it. How often do you think I should change it though? I also do agree that I need to add resistance, but I am not sure how I should go about that to avoid getting "buffed". My aim is a rock climber/calistenics athlete's body rather than a body builder's body that is why I aim for high reps and low weights. – Question Mark Sep 19 at 13:00

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