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Yes, there are benefits to training in the heat, but there are also risks. As @Ivo pointed out, you are far more likely to overheat / heat stroke / dehydrate when exercising in hot weather. However, if you take the proper precautions, there are benefits to be gained from training in the heat. What's more, these benefits will directly impact your success in ...


11

I believe this is dehydration and/or exhaustion. There are multiple message boards and online forums where people conclude this. Here is just one example I too have experienced this MULTIPLE times, usually after extremely hard workouts or prolonged endurance events. I've done multiple 24-hour ski races where I never stop during the 24-hours. I end up ...


5

It looks like there was a British study that concluded if you change room temperature from an average of 71°F to an average of 60°F (that's going to be quite a cold room) that one could burn 400 to 500 extra calories per day leading to a possible weight loss of about 9 pounds per year. That seems like an awful uncomfortable way to lose 9 pounds. ...


5

People that did a lot of exercise can have a lowered immune response, so they end up sick. Usually after many hours of working out like after marathons or ultra-marathons and so on some people get sick because their immune system doesn't have enough resources to fight off infections. That depends on your condition - do you work out a lot, how do you eat (do ...


4

There are varying ranges of educational levels for trainers. They could be non-high school graduates that sat for one of the 4-6 hour personal training courses to those having a Bachelor's in Exercise Science with a Master's of Exercise Physiology. Some of the time trainers will not know the reasoning behind a method (keeping the muscles warm in this case);...


3

I was living for many years in South India and training daily in Kalari (a martial art). In Kalari we have a simple method to deal with this problem. After training, we wait for the body to stop sweating before going into the shower. It is said that if you cool the body too soon by showering (i.e. whilst the body is still in a high metabolic state and ...


3

I play tournament badminton and having fever after a tournament or even longer games is standard for me. I get high body temperature, sore throat, clogged nose and all flu-like symptoms. Have to get under a warm blanket or wear a pullover cos of the cold. The symptoms stay only until night, and next morning they're gone. I eat properly during longer game ...


2

The rate of digestion depends upon the surface area of the food particles, and yes, its temperature, with the ideal temperature for gastric emptying being on the warm side (~43°C), but not hot. Similarly, enzyme activity is at its greatest at around core body temperature (~37°C) or slightly higher (~42°C), depending on the enzyme. However, the mechanical ...


2

Co-signing to what you said. In the hot summer days I would always try to drink a rather cold water in order to cool down. Just how you said the body warms it up so it basically takes away from the body's temperature. It always works well for me. I also know from my doctor that very cold water will shock your system and from my dentist that it is bad for ...


2

The energy you burn exercising is not directly connected to the ambient temperature. In fact you body is very efficient at regulating its temperature (within reasonable limits). So the only thing that changes as temperature go up is that you are going to sweat more to maintain normal body temperature, hence you will need to drink more to stay hydrated (See ...


2

Runners are cooled by the surrouding air (when cooler than the body temperature), and by sweat vaporization. The higher the air temperature, the more we rely on vaporization for keeping cool. If the humidity is high, the air is more saturated with water, and vaporization becomes less effective. The body responds by sweating more. If both temperature and ...


1

A cold pack can be applied to the abdomen, back of the neck, and/or inside of the upper thigh. This is a technique used by first responders to treat hyperthermia. The large surface area of the abdomen, combined with the proximity of the vascular organs of the liver, stomach, and intestine, make it an ideal site for rapid heat transfer. Similarly for the ...


1

Answering my own question, since I've had plenty of time to experiment recently: Immersing yourself in a pool is the fastest option, since the thermal conductivity of water is approximately 30x higher than air. Now this doesn't mean you cool down 30 times faster, because your skin is a good insulator and your body also has to pump heat out, but all things ...


1

I feel the same way after erging (rowing) a moderate (20 min) piece on my rower whether indoors or outdoors. I think the most important consideration for cool down is to reduce the amount of stress on the body gradually. I accomplish this by performing various stretches. The stretches serve two purposes. They give me a chance to relax after a tough ...


1

To improve sleep, there are many other things that you can do, that have much greater affect on your sleep quality. Develop a consistent sleep regime Less light at night Reduce caffeine intake in the afternoon Less screen time Reduce noise pollution, when going to sleep Less/No alcohol at night If you really want to take advantage of the temperature drop ...


1

It depends on your body and acclimation. I had a friend who was an excellent swimmer who died after being stranded in Lake Michigan when it was 45F. I was at a 1 and 2 mile race once where the water temperature was 68F, and it was early season so people had only acclimated with warm pool swimming. Out of 500 or so people, 3 women without wetsuits became ...


1

Based on the information in the answer to a question on the benefits on the benefits of running in the heat, you may indeed be reaping some benefits. At least one study shows: Heat acclimation improves the body’s ability to control body temperature, improves sweating and increases blood flow through the skin, and expands blood volume allowing the heart to ...


1

Drinking your cold water is fine. And no, it doesn't defeat the purpose of the exercise. The purpose of the exercises (and the heat), according to Bikram Yoga is : Yoga changes the construction of the body from the inside out, from bones to skin and from fingertips to toes. So before you change it, you have to heat it up to soften it, because a warm ...


1

Weight loss is significant with 2 things for normal individuals (no hormomal imbalances): Exercising more and Eating less That's common sense, and that's also science. With that being said, currently there is no scientific evidence regarding temperature and weight loss in a significant number. So, the answer is no, especially going from 75 degrees to 68 ...


1

Your issue is extremely common and simple. I also have a lot of experience with this. Your workout produce too much stress and your body have unsufficent means to deal with that. There is no magic workaround as far as I know. You need to do less and hope that your work capacity/tolerance will increase over time. I would suggest: do less rest more (for some ...


1

Surface Area vs Volume Not only does fat provide insulation...it also affects a body's surface area-to-volume ratio. Volume represents how many cells are in a body (and cell size, like in fat). Larger and more numerous fat cells means more volume. It also means more surface area. But because surface area grows at a square rate and volume grows at a cube, ...


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