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19

My experience with hyponatremia comes from Ironman racing and training. The thing I had to learn to do was to get enough salt into me. Sports drinks have no where near enough, compared to the rate I sweat at. I am at the high end of the range, 1.5L/hr or more. (Measure dry before, go out for 10 hours, track fluid in, rarely end up peeing, weigh after, ...


10

Hyponatremia is a deficiency in sodium. (hypo = low level/not enough; natrium = sodium; -emia = in the blood... not enough sodium in the blood). Not enough is not an absolute value, but a concentration value. The more water you drink the more sodium you need. Sweat mineral composition As you can see in this paper, sodium is the main mineral that will ...


6

Disclaimer: I am not a professional of any kind in this or any related field. I am not in fantastic shape, either. All I can really say for my cred is that I exercise regularly and I've completed a handful of races without dying. For the purposes of this Q&A, I am going to assume that the reason this sounds like quackery is because you are interested in ...


5

Your body will extract the water just fine. Water intake recommendations have varied wildly over the years with very little real evidence to back it up. The common recommendations was 8 cups or 2 litres of straight water a day. Some recent studies suggest that you should drink water if you're thirsty, but beyond that it doesn't matter. There has never been ...


4

Well, hydration relies on some basic principles: Drink a bit of water, all the time (not at specific times) Under physical activity, increase frequency Use mild temperature water (20-22ºC is the recommended tmp. if I'm not mistaken) (cold water refreshes but does not hydrate, mild water hydrates but does not refresh) Include non-dry fruits & vegetables ...


4

Let me start by saying that no amount of water will keep the doctor away. There're still many things that can go wrong. The 8 glasses of water is not backed up by any meaningful scientific evidence, it's just a rule of thumb. But it includes water from all sources including food. Making genral recommendations about things like fluid intake is bad idea as it ...


4

Water's water. As long as it is water and does not contain known poisons like pathogens or heavy metals then you'll be fine. You don't need much Mg for proper function. The well respected authority on the sceince of running, Dr Tim Noakes, is quoted as saying: Magnesium is another intracellular ion that, like potassium, is lost in sweat and urine during ...


4

Energy Drinks Generally, electrolyte drinks are most helpful for workouts lasting longer than 1.5 hours depending on how much you sweat. The more you sweat, the more electrolytes (sodium/potassium) you flush out and the more likely you are to need replacements. According to this WebMD article: The American College of Sports Medicine says that during ...


4

I don't know what your body fat percentage is but you need to have around 10% to have visible abs, mine is lower and I still barely see them. One way to make your abs more visible is to do actual weighted ab exercises. Most fit people can do well over 20 situps which is no longer stimulating hypertrophy, if you try situps with some weight you may see ...


4

First, distilled water is water that had its impurities removed by distilling. Essentially boiling the water to produce water vapor, gathering the vapor and re-condensing it into a new vessel. So let's start with health implications: Hydration is all about water absorption in your body--drinking low salinity water can't make you dehydrated. You might be ...


4

You’d be amazed how much more productive and energized you feel after starting a strength and cardio training regimen. As you’re just starting out, developing consistency is far more important than what exercises you do. Discipline is everything. Defined as: Control gained by enforcing obedience or order: orderly or prescribed conduct or pattern of ...


4

Creating draws more water into your muscle cells, which helps to increase muscle bulk and also increase protein synthesis (1)(2), although the total amount of water involved is relatively small. It may be this, or anecdotal evidence that creatine causes cramps - which does not appear to be backed up by evidence (3)(4), which has caused some articles to ...


3

Cooling of the body largely happens via evaporation of water, whether it's the water in your sweat or an external source. There's an additional cooling that happens when doused with water in that some of the heat is likely to be transferred to the water, which then drips away. On the other hand, you're increasing the amount of weight you're carrying, ...


3

If you are getting exhausted and fatigued after only 30 minutes, the problem isn't that you need an energy drink. The problem is that you are working out too hard. The fact that you are feeling tired later in the days would support that. The point of working out is to put training stress on your system. After you have done that, when you rest, you improve....


3

You are correct that both sleep and hydration are very important, especially for a training athlete. Many professional triathletes sleep 9-11 hours/night, in addition to a nap during the day. You stated that you ordinarily refrain from drinking water 2 hours before bed. This is the correct behavior. Furthermore, you should also not eat shortly before bed. ...


3

This might get closed for being offtopic, but personally I disagree. Additionally, I don't think this is opinion-based at all, and that people who think that's the case are ignoring the medical evidence for urine production. That said: You may want to consider adding a small bit of salt to your diet and seeing what that does for you. Salt generally ...


3

Perhaps a part of the problem is that you drink because you're bored, rather than thirsty. It may be worth trying to break that habit of consuming things for stimulation. To make your water more interesting, though, you could add: A touch of lemon or lime juice Low calorie/low sugar squash You could also try: Tea or coffee without milk/cream Green teas ...


2

I'm a fan of Dr. Thomas Levy. I've read his books. In short: If your last food has digested then you may drink as much water as you can, even a second before next meals. Non-veg food takes around 3 hours to digest and vegetarian ones 1-2 hrs, fruits 30-40 minutes etc. Don't drink when food is in your stomach as it dilutes the enzymes. Take least amount of ...


2

The Walkerton, Ontario investigation as noted by BillThor determined that people drinking 4+ liters of water per day experienced proteinuria (i.e. kidney damage): "Canadian doctors are warning that drinking too much water may cause loss of kidney function... Researchers... identified 100 otherwise healthy adults who had a condition called proteinuria, or ...


2

Carbohydrates attach to and retain water, so when your glycogen stores are reduced from alow carb diet, there is accompanying water weight loss imperfect citation here. This is often responsible for early, fast weight loss of up to 10 lbs. This rate of weight loss is not sustainable because once glycogen is depleted, the effect stops. The water extra water ...


2

This is a pretty complex topic, but I'll share some of what I learned from long-distance (> 10 hour, > 150 mile) bike rides. Though many people talk about electrolytes in general, the major concern is sodium. This is because the electrolyte that is most prevalent in sweat is sodium, and because the reserves of sodium in the body aren't very big. Whether ...


2

Co-signing to what you said. In the hot summer days I would always try to drink a rather cold water in order to cool down. Just how you said the body warms it up so it basically takes away from the body's temperature. It always works well for me. I also know from my doctor that very cold water will shock your system and from my dentist that it is bad for ...


2

Conditioning exercises attempt to increase athletic ability and capacity, but may also help reduce the likelihood of injury. Suppose you're a marathon runner, you don't just run marathons to train. You'd do shorter runs, some strength training etc and this will improve your marathon 'ability' even though your program does not include marathons. I have no ...


2

If I'm running in a hot race then I'll dump a glass of water over the back of my head (targetting the area just where my neck meets my head). Why? I want to reduce the risk of heat stroke and other heat related problems. If that area of the brain gets too hot then I have a very serious problem. More than that, I find that sense of relief it brings to be ...


2

Agreed with Sean on weight increase due to the water and possible chaffing.There is a good reason why our bodies sweat. Its a cooling mechanism. You should be more worried about keeping your self hydrated rather than drenching yourself in water. An arbitrary example; Imagine a water-cooling system for a high performance computer that is number crunching ...


2

You didn't mention if there is a specific taste you notice; I taste metal during and after an intense workout which apparently is caused by the heart not being able to keep up http://www.livestrong.com/article/322820-metallic-taste-in-the-mouth-during-exercise/.


2

"Conditioning" in this context means "preparing" or "getting used to". Here, it's used as to describe treading water as a general physical preparedness (GPP) exercise. In many other fitness contexts, "conditioning" means "cardio conditioning" or "metabolic conditioning", which means training to resist fatigue from physical effort. There is task- or sport-...


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