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6

Disclaimer: I am not a professional of any kind in this or any related field. I am not in fantastic shape, either. All I can really say for my cred is that I exercise regularly and I've completed a handful of races without dying. For the purposes of this Q&A, I am going to assume that the reason this sounds like quackery is because you are interested in ...


5

Your body will extract the water just fine. Water intake recommendations have varied wildly over the years with very little real evidence to back it up. The common recommendations was 8 cups or 2 litres of straight water a day. Some recent studies suggest that you should drink water if you're thirsty, but beyond that it doesn't matter. There has never been ...


4

Well, hydration relies on some basic principles: Drink a bit of water, all the time (not at specific times) Under physical activity, increase frequency Use mild temperature water (20-22ºC is the recommended tmp. if I'm not mistaken) (cold water refreshes but does not hydrate, mild water hydrates but does not refresh) Include non-dry fruits & vegetables ...


4

First, distilled water is water that had its impurities removed by distilling. Essentially boiling the water to produce water vapor, gathering the vapor and re-condensing it into a new vessel. So let's start with health implications: Hydration is all about water absorption in your body--drinking low salinity water can't make you dehydrated. You might be ...


4

I don't know what your body fat percentage is but you need to have around 10% to have visible abs, mine is lower and I still barely see them. One way to make your abs more visible is to do actual weighted ab exercises. Most fit people can do well over 20 situps which is no longer stimulating hypertrophy, if you try situps with some weight you may see ...


4

Creating draws more water into your muscle cells, which helps to increase muscle bulk and also increase protein synthesis (1)(2), although the total amount of water involved is relatively small. It may be this, or anecdotal evidence that creatine causes cramps - which does not appear to be backed up by evidence (3)(4), which has caused some articles to ...


4

You’d be amazed how much more productive and energized you feel after starting a strength and cardio training regimen. As you’re just starting out, developing consistency is far more important than what exercises you do. Discipline is everything. Defined as: Control gained by enforcing obedience or order: orderly or prescribed conduct or pattern of ...


3

Perhaps a part of the problem is that you drink because you're bored, rather than thirsty. It may be worth trying to break that habit of consuming things for stimulation. To make your water more interesting, though, you could add: A touch of lemon or lime juice Low calorie/low sugar squash You could also try: Tea or coffee without milk/cream Green teas ...


3

This might get closed for being offtopic, but personally I disagree. Additionally, I don't think this is opinion-based at all, and that people who think that's the case are ignoring the medical evidence for urine production. That said: You may want to consider adding a small bit of salt to your diet and seeing what that does for you. Salt generally ...


3

You are correct that both sleep and hydration are very important, especially for a training athlete. Many professional triathletes sleep 9-11 hours/night, in addition to a nap during the day. You stated that you ordinarily refrain from drinking water 2 hours before bed. This is the correct behavior. Furthermore, you should also not eat shortly before bed. ...


3

Cooling of the body largely happens via evaporation of water, whether it's the water in your sweat or an external source. There's an additional cooling that happens when doused with water in that some of the heat is likely to be transferred to the water, which then drips away. On the other hand, you're increasing the amount of weight you're carrying, ...


2

You didn't mention if there is a specific taste you notice; I taste metal during and after an intense workout which apparently is caused by the heart not being able to keep up http://www.livestrong.com/article/322820-metallic-taste-in-the-mouth-during-exercise/.


2

Conditioning exercises attempt to increase athletic ability and capacity, but may also help reduce the likelihood of injury. Suppose you're a marathon runner, you don't just run marathons to train. You'd do shorter runs, some strength training etc and this will improve your marathon 'ability' even though your program does not include marathons. I have no ...


2

If I'm running in a hot race then I'll dump a glass of water over the back of my head (targetting the area just where my neck meets my head). Why? I want to reduce the risk of heat stroke and other heat related problems. If that area of the brain gets too hot then I have a very serious problem. More than that, I find that sense of relief it brings to be ...


2

Agreed with Sean on weight increase due to the water and possible chaffing.There is a good reason why our bodies sweat. Its a cooling mechanism. You should be more worried about keeping your self hydrated rather than drenching yourself in water. An arbitrary example; Imagine a water-cooling system for a high performance computer that is number crunching ...


2

Isotonic drinks really have nothing to do with your metabolism or immune system. It's just water with solutes in it. As you noted above, salt and sugar are the two most common. The salt helps you retain the water. The sugar provides calories and, by some reports, produces a slight performance boost due to the taste of sugar (studies seem to indicate that it ...


2

"Conditioning" in this context means "preparing" or "getting used to". Here, it's used as to describe treading water as a general physical preparedness (GPP) exercise. In many other fitness contexts, "conditioning" means "cardio conditioning" or "metabolic conditioning", which means training to resist fatigue from physical effort. There is task- or sport-...


2

LiveStrong.com states that Diuretics are drugs formulated to remove excess water from your bloodstream to ease the pressure against the walls of your veins. Creatine also redirects fluids into the muscles. Thus, when you take diuretics and creatine concurrently, you increase the potential for dehydration and kidney damage. So that could be a concern (...


2

You should be hydrating all day long. This will help your body get the hydration it needs to repair your body after a work out. Drinking a lot a mere hour before working out does almost nothing; it's important to keep drinking. Do not resist the urge to drink after your workout. If you feel like you need a drink, take a drink. Note that hydrating all day ...


2

DEXA stands for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Apparently it is often abbreviated as "DXA" these days, for reasons I'm not sure about. The technique consists of taking an X-ray image of the body at two different energy levels of radiation. When taking an X-ray image of someone's body, some portion of the rays is going to be absorbed by the body, while ...


2

What your instructor is saying is quackery. However, why not make her happy? You might not need to drink water during the class. I think there is a bit of paranoia about hydrating that says you need to constantly be drinking water, and I'm not sure there is scientific evidence for this. I do an hour and ten minute weight lifting workout without drinking ...


2

Anytime someone quotes Ayurvedic alternative medicine, it should instantly raise your spider sense. There are yoga instructors that have a good grounding science/reality but there are also plenty that just regurgitate the dumb crap they learn in their certifications. Your instructors justification is horseshit but maybe they are just hoping to convince you ...


2

In yoga meta-physiology, burping is controlled by a specific prana, one of five major ones. An excess of burping would be considered an imbalance of the prana controlling that specific bodily function. Yoga practices, when presented in a balanced manner, would balance the five mjor pranas in the body resulting in overall health and possible addressing of the ...


2

There is no doubt that hypohydration negatively affects performance, both independently of thirst and independently of knowledge of our hydration status. Recent blind studies (here, here, here, and here) confirm the results of earlier research, whilst addressing its proposed methodological issues. There has long been, and remains, considerable question about ...


1

As in the answer here. It does not hurt you to drink water before physical activity. In the short term, it can cause muscle cramps because all that water moves around. It can also sound weird because it's sometimes possible to actually hear the water sloshing around. Some people have iron stomachs and won't have any of those uncomfortable effects. Others ...


1

It depends on your body and acclimation. I had a friend who was an excellent swimmer who died after being stranded in Lake Michigan when it was 45F. I was at a 1 and 2 mile race once where the water temperature was 68F, and it was early season so people had only acclimated with warm pool swimming. Out of 500 or so people, 3 women without wetsuits became ...


1

It's easy to check if you have diabetes or not, just do a blood test, but 110 oz = 3.25 liters and that's a normal amount of water. Unless you have heart failure or a severely compromised kidney function it's a safe and good amount of water to drink. The amount of water you should drink to make up for water lost due to sweating is 1.5 times the amount you ...


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