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The reason why it's hard to burn fat during high intensity exercise is that it's a slow and inefficient process of getting energy to the muscles. Your body will switch to using glycogen aerobically and/or anaerobically. The infamous "fat-burning zone" concept is highly misleading. It's true that we don't burn a lot of fat during high intensity exercise, ...


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Running properly isn’t bad for your knees, but running in bad form certainly can be. As a matured human being, you should train like a matured human being. It doesn’t matter what age or sex you are, the only factors that might change the way you train are things like injuries, sickness, disabilities, etc (goals too). I read an article once that spoke of how ...


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I suppose it depends on what you mean by heavy partial reps. I've found that training the initial deadlift pull (think, from the floor to about knee height) helped my deadlift. This is because being just shy of 2m tall, I've always found the initial pull from the floor a lot tougher than the lock out. If I can get the bar past my knees, then I've got the ...


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The phrase is a marketing slogan. That said, it is based on the principle that if you do the same thing time and time again, your gains will plateau at some point. By varying what you are doing and targeting the muscles in different ways, it will take your body longer to "get used" to a particular routine/exercise, which results in plateauing.


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Please consider the Starting Strength Program, which aligns well with your goals of strengthening your posterior chain and maximizing training-time efficiency: The Starting Strength Program is the best program for a Novice to develop the strength that will serve as the basis for all future training as well as increase performance in life and sports. The ...


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Partial range of motion exercises like quarter squats are really only good for increasing strength within the partial range of motion.[1] (With isometric exercises being a particularly extreme case of partial RoM, known for causing joint angle-specific strength increases.[2]) They are inferioir for building overall strength and inferior for causing muscle ...


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If you're looking to do 3-4 sets per week of one exercise then I think you'd be better off just playing more intensely with your dogs. That's way too low of a volume to even matter. Maybe get a weighted vest when you take your dogs on a jog and you can kill two birds with one stone? I would suggest aiming for 10 sets per muscle group per week. The types of ...


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The heart, arguably the primary target of cardiovascular training, is technically a muscle. While cardiac muscle is quite a bit different than skeletal muscle, significant stressing of the heart (typically considered to be either greater than 85% or greater than 90% of your calculated maximum heart rate) can result in both positive and negative effects on ...


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Consider doing each movement at less than 100% of failure and then your conditioning improves increase you can levels. Also use longer breaks in between movement as need but not to long. These breaks will also reduce inverse to the increase in stamina. It sounds like you have a structure routine that will do overall body or groups of muscles. If you only ...


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Strictly from a caloric expenditure point of view, you will burn roughly the same amount of calories in 30 minutes as you would in 45 minutes if the amount of work performed is equal. In a more complex, real-world example, working out for 30 minutes straight may actually burn slightly less calories overall because you will perform less work as you get more ...


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It depends entirely on what you're doing and what you're trying to achieve by doing it. For example, a block pull deadlift can help people get passed a sticking point in regular deadlift. It helps train your CNS to holding super-heavy weight. Coupled with the fact that you are physically holding the weight, so it should most certainly help training the ...


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Honestly, partial reps are best saved for the end of a set of full reps when you want to squeeze in a few more gains. This really depends on the workout though, I've particularly found them more beneficial with body-weight exercises like pull-ups and push-ups to increase you set count or try to expand your reps in the first and average set you can handle. ...


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Short answer: You should train like anybody else. Only thing what change with age is the error buffer. In other words, your body will tolerate less mistakes. So if you choose running (or any other activity), make sure that your body is prepared and you know how to do that correctly and safely. Long answer: make sure that your mobility and strength level ...


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You could experience: lack of energy/motivation or general fatigue muscle/strength loss hormone imbalance/low testosterone There are two fixes which come to mind: decrease activity level (# of days of activity or # of hours per session) increase cals to around maintenance (+200 or -200 should be a good range) Personally #2 sounds like the more attractive ...


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No. Although there may be some improvement, HIT isn't designed to improve upon cardiovascular fitness in any way, shape or form. HIT (High Intensity Training), as popularised by Arthur Jones in the 1970's, is designed to improve strength and muscular hypertrophy by performing weighted exercises, usually on machines (such as the Nautilus ones created by ...


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Yes. Sparring IS HIIT training, of course depending on the intensity you go. But it's pretty well known that more and more martial artists are doing HIIT training to prepare themselves for more and more rounds. Personally, as an amateur boxer, I get do HIIT training once a week by running sprints. 2km warmup, then 10 x 100m sprints. Then 2km run back home. ...


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The "HIT" you describe is a very specific kind of HIT, in that they're specifically advocating one set of as many repetitions as you can stand: Almost all high intensity training methods involve only performing one, all-out work set per exercise. That's contrary to the sports science definition of intensity in the context of lifting, which I've ...


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I did about 500 per day combined with a restricted food intake over some period of time and lost about 25 pounds. Here is the deal. I went to prison & only had muscle&fitness mags & men's health to study. This was my formula I discovered that worked four me... 200lbs 6`0=over weight now 173 & nicely baring a cut/tone. Take your body ...


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Think about what five minutes could possibly yield in conditioning. Obviously you have to issue a challenge to your heart and lungs walking isn't going to help you. Suppose you did the opposite of walking. Suppose you did wind sprints for five minutes, that is, you ran 40 meters in one direction as fast as you can- a full out sprint every step of the way, ...


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Your workout goals are good and I think you can easily pursue them if you give around 45 minutes to an hour daily. Being a doctor I would advise you to consult with an orthopedician or a physical therapist before doing any leg workout, considering your meniscus issue. For upper body, the workout you are doing right now seems perfect though. You could also ...


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Do you live near a track or in a good neighborhood to run in? Do this outside - make it fun. Do Intervals in Sets and Reps - Get AWAY from using time There's nothing in life that's fun and consists of you "watching the clock" why add cardio to that list? Use a set distance instead -- it gives you an insensitive to push yourself. The harder you work ...


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You've got a few options, though honestly none of them are going to fit your ideal scenario. 1) As Kevin Lee suggested, just do 30 seconds sprint, let it slow down and do 30 seconds walking. You're still doing intervals. If you're worried about the time that the treadmill is spending changing speed, then shorten your walking period to take that into account....


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Just do a full 30 seconds at the sprint speed and a full 30 seconds at your walking speed. It will still be considered a HIIT workout.


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down vote Your thought process is right. Doing high-intensity workouts will force your body into EPOC(Excessive Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption) where your body is burning fat even hours after your workout. There are many types of HIIT programs that you can follow. One of them is sprinting for a certain amount of time, let's say 20 seconds and slow jogging ...


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The articles are probably based on variations of Tabata style training, a form of HIIT, which has been studied and does indeed show better overall improvements in both aerobic and anaerobic capacities. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8897392 High intensity interval training (HIIT) is based on short periods of maximum effort, usually 30 seconds to 1 ...


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I would reiterate what some people have said about addressing your diet first before going gungho on exclusively burpees. I know for myself I used to run a couple miles every day (not super regularly but often enough I thought should have made a difference). Nothing really changed for me until I made dietary changes. In my experience the following holds ...


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If you’ve got steps in your house/apartment, you can duplicate those exercises easily. In fact, stairs can be used for a variety of exercises. For starters, try Stair Tricep Dips with Triceps press on the stairs. You can substitute step ups on the stairs for your leg work. Additionally, if you can get a hold of an exercise ball, or, aerobic step, those ...


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I can recommend diamond push-ups or bodyweight tricep extensions both of them in combination with doing wide grip push ups where you go close to the ground and swing from the left to the right without pushing yourself up.


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You could likely see greater improvements by moving your HIIT workout to before your long run, and by shortening your HIIT intervals. Moving the HIIT training to before the longer run will allow you to attack it with a greater intensity, which works well, as intensity is the key component of the HIIT strategy. A 50 minute run at 8.5mph is tiring for the ...


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Work out harder but less often is likely to lead to improvement. HIIT takes a lot out of you; to be able to do it well - and you need to be able to do it well for it to help you out - you need to be well rested. If you are doing it every day, you can only work out "kindof hard", not really hard, and kindof hard isn't going to put enough training stress on ...


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