7

Yes. Strength is specific to the measurement being performed, so it's possible that the lighter athlete could just be more trained in the specific movement being performed. For example, a 300lb professional arm wrestler would probably beat a 500lb strongman in an arm wrestling contest. Even when both are trained in strength test being performed, it's ...


6

I did a little digging around, and I found a review article that was published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in 2010 (So relatively recent), with a full link to the PDF here. The author went through 200+ articles to try and determine the best mechanisms for muscular hypertrophy as noted by the abstract (Emphasis mine): Schoenfeld, ...


5

First off, if you think you may have cracked a tooth, I highly recommend that you see a dentist. If your teeth are that loose, there is likely an underlying cause that you need to deal with comparable to someone with injuries having to be treated before being able to undertake strenuous exercises. However, I think you have a genuine question in there. In ...


5

Basically, your body will start shutting down external systems (muscle control, digestion, etc) to preserve glucose to keep the brain ticking over. For a good example of this, look at the video of Gabriela Andersen-Scheiss (Then Gabriela Andersen) at the Olympic marathon in 1984. You can see that over the last lap, she has little control and keeps wandering ...


5

Your Lower back Pain seems to emerge from you studying too much, which means that you don't have a correct posture or proper seat with support. Although you can alleviate the pain, i recommend checking in your posture to prevent future problems such as chronic back pains. Exercise increases blood flow and boosts muscle activity , hence alleviating pain. You ...


4

As noted by JohnP, there's not a lot of direct side effects at first, the effect being the result of your body routing energy to essential systems at the cost of others, but the effect is much like being drunk in that you lose coordination, reaction speed, and common sense. In much the same way that drinking alcohol sharply increases your risk of trauma, ...


4

Cellular oedema would reverse rather quickly after exercise. As far as pump goes, there is one simple explanation, and one complicated one. Cellular oedema due to an influx of Na and H2O probably contribute, but not as much. The simple one is that while exercising, there is local hypoxia and hypertension. This causes the vascular resistance to decrease, ...


4

There are lots of great answers regarding this topic on this very site: Why do so many fitness websites still reference somatotypes? I have my own theory regarding this topic that I've developed over the years by reading a lot of nutrition articles and journals. Although there is research in this field, from my point of view it all boils down to insulin ...


2

Finding precise studies seems to be hard, but I think we might be dealing with two factors: psychological and physiological. On a psychological level, there is habit formation. Taking an extract from Wikipedia: Habit formation is the process by which a behaviour, through regular repetition, becomes automatic or habitual. This is modelled as an increase in ...


2

You should perform a combination of heavy weight training (squats, lunges, calves with legpress) and explosive training (box jumps, sprints) to increase your fast power and improve muscle coordination


2

From https://www.strengthandconditioningresearch.com/muscles/hamstrings/ The hamstrings are a group of four muscles on the back of the thigh. Three of them are two-joint muscles (performing both knee flexion and hip extension) while the fourth performs only knee flexion. As a group, the hamstrings can therefore be trained by exercises that involve ...


1

I would adapt the lens you're viewing this through. Going muscle by muscle, while it has merit, is much harder than viewing the movement you're trying to correct. You're already seeing that with your valid Good Morning question. Extending your example, say Good Mornings do work the hamstrings more than the lower back. They might be worthwhile for you then, ...


1

This is actually the ideal; your feet should splay to absorb impact as they strike the ground (ideally with a mid-foot strike) http://www.barefootbeginner.com/2012/08/14/how-will-my-feet-change-when-i-become-a-barefoot-runner/ Folk who run in typical running shoes usually don't benefit from this foot splay, as their shoes keep their feet squeezed together. ...


1

It's an interesting question and unfortunately, I don't know of any specific studies that actually answer the question. My answer is more about logic and personal experience. The stronger you are, the more your muscular endurance should be at lower weights. If your max bench is 100kg, then you're logically going to be able to do more reps with 50kg than ...


1

All of what you've described sounds like normal human movement, and unlikely to harm you; however, a disclosure: these ways (fast and slow) are how I ascend stairs, too. A minor note: I suspect that your feet are in plantar flexion, not "flexed out". This position, coupled with flexed knees, provides more shock absorption than dorsiflexed feet and extended ...


1

Sometimes, this does go away if you train the muscle with weight so your nerves and muscle fibers can work better together. (personal experience) Another possible cause for painfully tight flexing is an overshortened muscle. Muscles that cross two joints enter active insufficiency when both joints are flexed together. For example, if you flex your bicep by ...


1

I would stretch them out first and try to increase your flexibility. Maybe you are not recovering from your workouts sufficiently. Not knowing you, it is hard to hypothesize, but those are the only issues I can think of outside of an existing injury.


1

The general consensus is that testosterone levels start to decline around age 30, with the average being about 1.5% per year. This is one possible reason. Along with this, consider the likely life scenarios. In your 20's, especially for professional athletes, you are in the "hungry" phase, where you are trying for that next contract, pay raise, endorsement ...


1

One possible risk is that milk can thicken your phlegm (although it doesn't actually make you produce more), which may create difficulty as you begin to breathe more heavily, because you'll have to either breathe through the phlegm or cough it up and spit it out. More speculative, while I don't see the milk simply "curdling" in your stomach, you might run ...


1

You probably won't see this addressed in the texts and papers as it is a somewhat rare occurrence that doesn't affect the general sporting population. In this study, they address alveolar hypoxia due to lung injury and/or climbing at high altitudes (Everest type altitudes) that causes pulmonary edema. Both of these would impair the gas exchange at the ...


1

This is a question that has been addressed by many governing bodies. The NCAA policy (page 13) is that MTF transgender athletes can compete after a year of living with their new, lowered-testosterone hormonal profile: A trans female (MTF) student-athlete being treated with testosterone suppression medication for Gender Identity Disorder or gender dysphoria ...


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