26

A very well thought out question. First, the technical term for holding your breath is called the Valsalva maneuver. In the world of weight lifting it has a distinct purpose: to increase the body's ability to protect the spine under heavy load. The Valsalva maneuver does not work alone. There's a pretty fair treatment of the subject on a Rebock Crossfit ...


12

When you say breathe in, L, R, L, R; breathe out, L, R, L, R we like to call this 4:4. That is 4 steps on inhale, 4 steps on exhale. This study tries to analyze some of the breathing dynamics of humans during running. While it's pretty long and technical, it's been written about in more layman's terms here. The gist of it suggests that a 2:1 pattern ...


9

Growing up surfing, I'd get water in my nose constantly. When stuffed up I'd splash some up in there and snot rocket all the junk out. Even a "saline nasal spray" is just a fancy way of blowing salt water into your nose. If there's a problem I'd venture to guess it has more to do with whatever badness is in the water (chemicals, pathogens, etc). You can ...


7

If humans run, their breathing is not connected to their stride. Why don't you just breath the way it is comfortable with you? Especially when you just started to run, you shouldn't worry about anything like breathing patterns. Just try to find the "fun" in running!


7

From a Runner's World article: Breathlessness may also be due to fatigue of the inspiratory muscles, primarily the diaphragm. Just as we condition and build the endurance of our skeletal muscles, the diaphragm also requires similar conditioning. As for preventing it, here are two things that have really helped me: Warm Up - Start by walking briskly for ...


7

"since breathing necessarily disrupts your flow" I think the amount of disruption relates to how far from perfect your form is. Since they need to breathe, they put a lot of work in perfecting their body and stroke movement so there is almost no additional body movement related to breathing. If the catch and pull are done correctly, the body is swiveling ...


6

You might be interested in reading this about the research of the late prof. Buteyko: @MR04: "controlling your breathing and taking in large breaths increases blood flow and provides oxygen faster to your brain and the rest of your body." Not necessarily. If you lose too much CO2 by breathing too much, you'll actually reduce available oxygen for the brain....


6

It sounds a lot like you experienced a "runner's high". This is something that usually is experienced by runners, as running is the most common form of aerobic exercise, and runners therefore experience this quite often. They run for a while, get exhausted, and achieve a sort of second wind, or as you describe it, a sudden burst of energy. When you're ...


5

It depends why you're running. If you're running to build your general aerobic and cardiovascular fitness, the rule of thumb I learned in the US Marine Corps is not to follow a particular breathing pattern, but to aim for a certain level of exertion. You should be breathing in a way that allows you to talk, but not sing. If you can sing at a normal tempo, ...


5

Don't breathe in through your mouth while jogging. Breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. This helps regulate your rate of breathing as well as the temperature and particulate content of the air hitting your throat and lungs.


5

I would not regard that author as focusing on strength. Instead, her experience speaks to "weight loss and wellness" camps, where the need for a rigid trunk during maximal and near maximal exertion is not necessary. What probably is worth highlighting in a weight loss camp however is proper breathing, since it's primarily an aerobic (with oxygen) affair. ...


5

When we don't have enough oxygen in our system though exhaustion from physical exercise we slow down and/or stop. In extreme cases some may pass out due to lack of oxygenated blood supply to their brain. Wearing a mask restricts air flow and so will bring about exhaustion faster. To counter this your diaphragm will have to work harder and so over continued ...


4

Let me suggest you these articles for a start: G Lippi, GC Guidi, N Maffulli. Air pollution and sports performance in Beijing. "There is little doubt that the presence of several air pollutants might be detrimental to athletic performance due to the marked increase (up to 20-fold) in ventilatory rate and concomitant nasal and oral breathing. Moreover, mouth ...


4

Classic studies usually link air pollution with lung conditions. I find this recent study extremely interesting though: Researchers from Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium split a group of 24 runners into two groups: those from urban areas and those from rural areas. During a 12-week period, the two groups were asked to run three days a ...


4

Neither way is "just wrong", although if you breath out completely every time your face hits the water, you can start hyperventilating. Breathing in swimming is just like any other sport, you breath in or out as much as you need to. If you are swimming at a slower pace, you may not need to breathe every single stroke, so you can exhale over a longer period ...


4

In your previous question you say you're not sure if changing your diet is required...this couldn't be farther from the truth. If you want to maximize results, diet is by far the most important factor in addition to sleep and recovery. Also, this "minimum" concept is horribly flawed but I won't even address that here, I'm sure you're already aware anyways. ...


4

The main limitation here is that the oxygen you inhale before you submerge, is consumed by your muscles as you swim. The more energy you use, the faster your oxygen depletes, and this is what causes the "damn, I need to go up top and breathe again" feeling. The best way to improve your underwater distances, is to learn the best techniques; that is to say, ...


4

Primarily lung capacity is the issue here, but the rate at which your body uses oxygen is determined by your overall fitness level, muscle mass and technical efficiency. As a competitive swimmer with 30+ years experience, I know from experimenting that I can swim further/longer underwater by using a relaxed, steady pace (long, controlled breastroke pull and ...


4

If you are new to jogging just breathe naturally through your mouth. It's the best way to get oxygen in and CO2 out. Wait until your cardiovascular system get conditioned to try the nose/mouth technique


4

It's better to breathe with both the mouth and the nose to increase the airflow to your lungs. Your lungs have to work extra hard when air is only allowed to flow through the nostrils. This applies to all forms of running.


3

Is there a correct way to breathe? No. If you are doing heavy compound movements such as the squats and deadlifts, the valsalva maneuver is used to ensure a tight core so that you protect your lower back and able to power through when doing the movements. With that said, even the valsalva maneuver has its pros and cons. As for running/jogging, I would go ...


3

I've experienced similar symptoms during CrossFit metcon style workouts where I'm breathing heavily in conjunction with lifting moderately heavy weights. The sensation is not unlike the blocked/muffled ears you experience during take-off or landing when flying (but without the discomfort). I spoke to my GP about it and his assessment was that it sounded ...


3

What the coaches mean, is that when you turn your head to the side, water forms kind of a "bow wave" coming off of your head/forehead, which causes a small trough (area of lower water) to form near your nose/chin, and it's in this pocket that you breathe. Yes, your eye will be underwater, but the bow wave moves the water away from the rest of your face. ...


3

There are various breathing exercises for beginners with the kickboard: If you are right handed and prefer breathing from the right, then keep your left hand outstretched to the front of the board and the right hand bent and on the bottom side, then breathe from the right with normal kicking patterns by twisting your head to the right. The key here is to ...


3

I have had the same issue and found a solution that worked for me. I live in Chicago where we recently had the horrible cold snap. I was still running, keeping up with my winter routine, and what I do is wear a gator or face mask for skiing. As i breathed through it while I was running, it helped to moisturize the air as I breathed, keeping my lungs and ...


3

These exercises are variations of the hollow body hold, which is quite a common exercise for gymnasts in order to perfect their handstand. As this an intense core exercise, it is always going to be especially hard to breath due to the abs being held in contraction. However, I personally do these types of exercises and find that quick forceful exhaling and ...


3

There could be quite a few different causes, from internal to environmental. My first thought is EIB (Exercise Induced Bronchospasm), which used to be called exercise induced asthma. It can be mild to serious. Other than that, a pulmonologist or other expert should probably be consulted, to rule out anything physical.


3

Common issue, you misconceive that pulling belly in is correcting your Lumbar Lordosis, or Anterior Pelvic Tilt (APT). Your erector spinae (lower back spinal muscles) and hip flexors tend to be tight (and should be stretched), and the glutes and abdominals tend to be weak (and should be strengthened). This typically causes one's butt and gut to stick out. ...


3

I suspect they breathe that much because that's just how much they need to... when going all out at that pace. From what you described of your own experience, you seem to be doing more long-distance/endurance swimming, which is pretty different from sprinting. Speaking for myself, when I do long distance, I definitely breathe less often than when I'm ...


3

I am assuming that you are doing freestyle. Without actually seeing you, I'm guessing that you have a form problem, and/or are going slow enough that you aren't able to create the "bow wave" effect where the water coming over your head flares out slightly to give you a space. When you breathe, you want to turn your head to the side, and slightly tuck your ...


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