7

"since breathing necessarily disrupts your flow" I think the amount of disruption relates to how far from perfect your form is. Since they need to breathe, they put a lot of work in perfecting their body and stroke movement so there is almost no additional body movement related to breathing. If the catch and pull are done correctly, the body is swiveling ...


6

Practice, practice and more practice. Generally your form will fall apart in almost any sport once you start getting fatigued. If it happens every time on your fast 100's, then you are going too fast for your fitness. If you have been swimming for a year and showing very little improvement in your overall times, then you may have some stroke flaws that ...


6

I used the time predictor from this site: http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/general/rws-race-time-predictor/1681.html Based on your 1500m time I am getting 38:13 for the 10k. You will not be able to improve your cardiovascular fitness much in time for the race Focus on taking it easy for the week leading up to your race and concentrate on pacing Aim for a ...


4

Maximal legspan contain lateral and vertical movements such as vertical splits and lateral splits. Rarity of people achieve sufficient technique and strength to maintain different splits and rotational movements of thighs so they are hard-to-use benchmarks. Many factors contribute to legspan. Factors contain core flexibility, core strength, pelvis tilt and ...


4

You were likely taught to cup you hand in some beginner class. That's not so much "wrong," just ineffective & unnatural. It also doesn't add to your propulsive power as you may think. The cup has proven to not add any difference in propulsive power through enough studies. It also forces you to focus on a minor matter that actually adds unnecessary ...


3

Back in the 1970's, the theory was to hold your fingers together. Then people started applying engineering and science to sports. One of the early investigations was of Dara Torres, involving the hand shape that she used. She had ignored the prevailing theory, and swam with a 'relaxed' hand shape, with the fingers apart. And she was good (spectacularly so). ...


3

The Gait Cycle Gait essentially is a transition between repeated loss of balance and recovery. During movement there is a cyclic transfer between potential and kinetic energy which will minimize the energy cost of walking. Efficient movement involves preserving and transferring the greatest amount of energy (your momentum) to help propel you forward ...


3

I suspect they breathe that much because that's just how much they need to... when going all out at that pace. From what you described of your own experience, you seem to be doing more long-distance/endurance swimming, which is pretty different from sprinting. Speaking for myself, when I do long distance, I definitely breathe less often than when I'm ...


2

It's a really good question, and rectus abdominis (abs) was a tough one for me to figure out personally. For a lot of exercises like the deadlift and front squat (and back squat, but so much more clearly on the front) you want to have your back locked into a neutral position. For a demonstration, try locking your forearm into a 45 degree bend at the elbow ...


2

My suggestion is to pick up a copy of the book Total Immersion, it specializes in teaching about good form with some interesting concepts thrown in. One thing I think I recall reading from it is that when you feel your form falter during a rep, stop! Or the bad form becomes habitual. Swim only when the form is good, and build up distance and speed at the ...


2

My general experience for this is yes, keep those shoulders shrugged. For almost all cases where weight is being locked out overhead, keeping those shoulders shrugged becomes more about safety than anything else. Yes, shrugging will engage the traps, but also helps bring the shoulders back into the vertical plane (think of bringing the shoulders back, or a ...


1

Yes.. it goes like this: lifting legs to body-lower rectus abdominis or lower abs examples: reverse crunches, hanging knee or hanging leg raises lifting torso- upper rectus abdominis or upper abs examples: crunches, hanging from feet from bar, cable crunches The same also applies to obliques: lifting legs to the side: obliques but stresses lower portion ...


1

As Mike described - depends. When you walk - typically you start with hill. There are some phases like foot locking. When walking that is effective, as things developed during evolution. When running - there are different forces, and you should land on forefoot, not on hill. That should happen, when the foot is close / under your body. That way you use ...


1

So your objective is to build muscle, in this case glutes. To build muscle you need to stress those muscles the proper way. In this case, the proper way would be adequate repetitions (8-12) and adequate series (4-5) therefore defining the weight to be used depending on the exercise. That is up to you to define. The exercise selection you provided is ...


1

One tool that can help you to control the frequency of your strokes is a tempo trainer. Controlling the frequency would let you to gradually increase it until you reach a point where you feel that the technique fails. E.g swim 50m with a time between strokes of 1:25. If you that the technique is ok, decrease it to 1:15, swim 50m, etc Once you find a ...


1

Honestly, your body is going to try to use them properly and all you have to do is let it. Using good posture and good form when executing lifts, punches, kicks, walking, standing, and every other aspect of life and your core will support you. If you want more of a personal demonstration than I would suggest seeking out a personal trainer or other fitness ...


1

So continuing with my education, I've learned that resistance training isn't really going to help, unless I was unfamiliar with running in general, and I was blatantly weak in many areas. That is not the case. Resistance training and training with tools will not help, at least not at first. Typically tools aren't used to fix running form-they're used to ...


1

I have read that not all "heel striking" is necessarily bad. It depends on how you're actually landing. Some notables land more incidentally towards the front part of the heel with bent knees and then roll forward.[1][2] As for the rear leg going too far back, again it depends. What is the driving mechanism being employed? Are the quads coming into play too ...


1

It sounds as if you should incorporate some stretching(holding for 30 seconds to try and increase your flexibility). Running drills will be the best thing to improve your running style. Also doing some short fast intervals, whilst thinking about your running form will help get your knees up. Ie coming off toes, driving with arms, head up looking forward. ...


1

Try taking your shoes off. Or, probably better, buying some zero-drop, low-stack-height shoes (the Merrell Vapor Glove is my personal favorite). This will provide immediate feedback on over-striding and the accompanying heel-striking because it will hurt. As you build up strength in your feet, ankles, and calves, it will probably also help with the ...


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