15

I think you've heard the right idea, but you're misinterpreting it. Of course high reps builds some strength, but certainly not a whole lot. It's going to take a lot more effort (in terms of joules spent) to increase your 5RM by doing 15-rep sets, than it would to increase it by actually doing 5-rep sets. Don't think of it as "it does, or it doesn't". Most ...


11

How does [someone] prepare to do 110 pull ups in a row Start by recognizing this as an extreme goal. I bet the people achieving >75 pull-ups got there by doing gymnastics or bar calisthenics for years. Coming even close to this number of pull-ups in one set is such a rare skill that you shouldn't ask anyone who hasn't done it. (Elite training is so ...


7

There is considerable overlap between these modalities; the physiological changes that occur are very similar, however, the effects differ slightly. From an anatomical point of view: Hypertrophy training is the only modality that stands out when it comes to an increase in the muscle cross sectional area. Training power (slightly) and strength (more so) ...


7

It's great that you are making this choice to change your health for the better. There are a few things that you can do to really improve your chances of success: Understand this is going to take a long time, be patient with yourself. Your goal is to be a better version of yourself. Get support. Quitting smoking is not easy, so it helps to get the ...


7

What not to do First off, if you're doing situps on the floor, stop it immediately. Floor situps are harmful for your back, and provide little to no effect in terms of abdominal muscle growth. While pushups are more beneficial, I have to start by saying that 5 minutes isn't enough time to do any work from which to enjoy physical benefits. It might serve as ...


5

My nutrition is standard low carb diet (about 40% protein / 60% fats, I eat cake/sweets max 2 times a week no more than 100g). Ding ding ding! We've found the culprit. Your body relies on carbohydrate for most of its energy. If you go low-carb, you're relying on transitioning from using carbs to ketosis, where you're using fats. Many people report being ...


5

I train for cycling time trials, ranging from 10 mile sprints to 12 hr endurance races. I train on Heart rate and power meters, so I know accurately when I've upped my endurance/fitness. I find if I have a training session, whether that be Turbo or out on the road and I've exceeded a burn of 3000 cals then that following night (without fail) I will suffer ...


4

There is a concept known as "training stress". When you put stress on your system and then give your body time to recover, you will improve. When you started, it was easy for you to put stress on your system, but over time, your body adapted, and now you only put enough stress on your system to stay where you are. The solution is to change up what you are ...


4

Hi DoubleDouble, There's this general myth (usually by people who spend countless hours at the gym) that one needs to visit a gym in order to exercise effectively. While going to the gym is a good idea, it's not a must. It works effectively for some people and not for others. Many people have gotten stronger without stepping into a gym. It seems that it ...


4

Most of my answer is already contained in this answer, although the questions are not really duplicates. A couple things that I will reiterate: The biggest mistake that the vast majority of runners make is going too hard on their easy days, and not hard enough on their hard days. Speedwork is the icing on the cake, make sure you bake the cake first (i.e., ...


4

You have to build economy in the tecnique of run. This means you want to increase your speed as much as you can but without going above the 4 mmol threshold of lactic acid in the blood. For the breaks If you want to use them in training, you can use repetition of 1/3 or 1/4 of the distance you want to run at slightly higher intensity ( for exemple 4x10km ...


4

The notion that low-intensity stead-state endurance work is required to elicit an increase in stroke volume is an outdated one, an assumption made from early observations that stroke volume appeared to ‘plateau’ at around 40% of VO₂max. However, a large body of research has since demonstrated that no such plateau exists, especially amongst elite-level ...


4

I would agree with your trainer. Partial reps are a tool, and every tool has its pros and cons. The pros of partial reps include the fact that you can carry on with an exercise when you can no longer do full ROM with good form, and you still want to push it a bit further to exert a smaller subset of the muscle group more. You should of course not be ...


4

You could keep your bodyweight mass down, lose fat if you have any, and do several lat exercises such as landmine rows with t bar, or lat bars, one armed rows, etc. Use an endurance type rep scheme(15-20). Working your forearm strength and grip as well as core and biceps to some degree with additional training. Try adding weight here and there but focus more ...


4

I imagine it has something to do with him being a full-time professional athlete with multiple full-time coaches optimizing his training.


3

Low carb is indeed a very good basis to start of from. Its however not directly suitable for doing high intensity workouts. Your body is perfectly capable of producing sugar from fat and protein and will happily store that in your liver and muscles to fuel short bursts of strength. Ones your stores are exausted however, your body won't be able to produce new ...


3

+1 zero carbs kills your energy and your mental capacity/health (your brain is the largest consumer of glucose). In the short term this is OK for gains like boot camp weight loss or training for an event, but it's no way to live well. Avoid the soda and candy, but make room in your life for "good carbs" (longer chain) like almonds, sweet potatoes, kidney ...


3

You should have no problem doing that in 10 months. I don't agree that her physique is a heavy-lifter's physique. Women who lift heavy are generally much more curvy (bigger butt, trunk). I would say that she probably runs and does high intensity interval training (HIIT) type exercises -- and that's what I'd recommend. Take a 20-30 minute run every day ...


3

Trying to maintain 80% max HR for 30 minutes is probably going too far - you usually won't reach that unless you're doing something fairly intense. That said, it will be fairly hard to do something "unhealthy" unless you have a heart condition, or try biking for way too long (2+ hrs) without having built up endurance first. Resting and Max heart rate values ...


3

I boxed for four years and came out of one of the best gyms in the midwest. It was no frills and no excuses type of place in one of the worst areas of the US. But they were popping out guys for the Olympic team like candy. We also had a trainer that is recognized internationally. I will let his methods answer your question since you are more or less ...


3

The workouts in Crossfit gyms tend to be rather generalized. They pride themselves on not being an ace in anyone thing, but being a jack in several. The reality is that some things, like a snatch, you really don't want to do unless you're an ace. To perform Olympic lifting, and even something as relatively straight forward as a deadlift requires technique ...


3

There are more explanations than this one, but one is what type of muscle fibre you strengthen. Muscle fibre type 1 are slow, weak but have high stamina, type 2 have low stamina but are stronger and faster. This is why some people are born to be sprinters while some are born to run long distances. If you do many reps, your type 2 fibres will tire and the ...


3

It is possible to have both strength and endurance. There are a lot of long distance runners who have significant upper body strength because muscles process oxygen better and help with running. As Eric says in the comments it is hard to be elite in both strength and endurance training because to be elite at strength training you are all but guaranteed to ...


3

What you're referring to is genetic potential which is: ...theoretical optimum performance capability which an individual could achieve in a specific activity, after an ideal upbringing, nutrition and training. In real terms it may be assumed that the finalists in a world championship are among the human beings whose performance comes closest to ...


3

Everything else being equal, sure, a myocyte (muscle cell) with more myofibrils (fibers) will be stronger than one that has less. But that's a really narrow statement that dodges the other elements of force production. Just to start with some background: A newborn baby has more muscle cells than a 30 year old pro body builder, it's the size of the myocytes ...


3

As someone who trains triathlon and has suffered badly from a cervical disc herniation, I suggest you stick with swimming for quite a while. The flat truth is that swimming is unique. I can run for miles and bike for hours, but the first time I got in the pool, swimming 25m was ridiculously hard. Swimming is almost entirely about technique. There is an ...


3

Yes, it’s possible. Is it possible for the vast majority of people? No. Is it beneficial? No. How long would it take? 52 hours at a pace of 2.5 minutes per 100 meters. Here is one guy that could do it. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Strel


3

Question is what does extended period here mean? Does it mean 10 minutes or 30 minutes or 60 minutes? Your specific question is answered within the article you link to in the sentence after the one where it says “exercise at a moderate level of intensity for an extended period”: A good routine is starting with a warm up of the muscles, followed by ...


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