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12

First every HR monitor will read your HR differently. To get an actual reading you will need to do a Vo2Max test at a Doctor. 2nd You are listing quite a large range for 30 minutes. There is a difference between 30 minutes at 171 and 30 minutes solid at 190. What is your average? Finally, the VO2Max is only attainable in the lab and a formula is only a ...


7

If you enjoy it and feel great (and still do, after a week) then you aren't doing damage. But you may not be optimising your results either... Perception of effort is a better guide to exercise intensity than HRM and "rules of thumb" about training zones. If you can train for 30 minutes at steady output (as measured by the exercise bike) then you are ...


5

There is a simple answer that lies in both your question and in the chart you provide. Your question says, “…is it bad to train...”. Training implies you are trying to improve. Zone 5, is not improving and therefore not training. The chart says zone 5 is “Recommended for: Very fit persons with athletic training background.” Have you already been ...


5

The negative effect on VO2max due to detraining varies a bit with different studies, with losses ranging from 4-14% when training is stopped for less than 4 weeks [1-8]. Obviously, the longer the inactivity, the more the negative impact on VO2max., to a point. For example one study found that endurance athletes lost 7% of their VO2max in the first 21 days of ...


4

VO2max is the amount of oxygen which your cells are able to convert into CO2. It doesn't say anything about the anaerobic threshold, for that you need to do a Conconi test (there are many variants of that test for all kinds of sports). High VO2max on a cellular level means you have a good lung and mitochondrial function, because these two factors contribute ...


4

VO2 max is the amount of oxygen available for energy burn and is associated with runs that are shorter than 5-8 minutes total. Anything longer than this your body must deal with lactate acid buildup in your muscles. In other words I think its fair to say its good predictor for sprints assuming you are actually prepared and have been training to do this type ...


4

Pretty late to the party on this one but thought it was worth adding that the JavaScript behind the runners world calculator is pretty simple. Looking at the function toolSubmit (which is called when the "Calculate" button is clicked) it's clear that it calculates calories burned as: calories burned = distance run (kilometres) x weight of runner (kilograms) ...


4

Worth noting, without data from an ECG (heart rate monitor) and face mask based gas analyzers, along with details of the gradient, wind speed, and surface there aren't any accurate equations. The best you can do is to estimate a VO2 (mL·kg-1·min-1) figure, and convert that into a Kcal one: Kcal/Min ~= respiratoryExchangeRatio * massKg * VO2 / 1000 Note: ...


4

The following formula should allow you to convert between MET, vVo2Max, VO2Max, KCal/min: MET = vVO2Max = VO2Max / 3.5 ~= kCalBurnt / (bodyMassKg * timePerformingHours) Kcal/Min ~= 5 * bodyMassKg * VO2 / 1000 VO2 ~= (currentHeartRate / MaxHeartRate) * VO2Max MaxHeartRate ~= 210 - (0.8 * ageYears) ...


4

The reason why it's hard to burn fat during high intensity exercise is that it's a slow and inefficient process of getting energy to the muscles. Your body will switch to using glycogen aerobically and/or anaerobically. The infamous "fat-burning zone" concept is highly misleading. It's true that we don't burn a lot of fat during high intensity exercise, ...


3

There is a handful of "accepted" formulae to calculate one's 1RM based on other xRMs. In fact, there's a nice Wikipedia article that lists them: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-repetition_maximum#Calculating_1RM But in all cases, you have to keep in mind that there doesn't exist a single formula that could perfectly predict any person's 1RM given ...


3

Yes, V̇O₂ is “the weight-normalized volume rate of oxygen that is consumed during training,” expressed in ml/min/kg, but more fundamentally, it is a metric for the time-rate of energy production. Thus, V̇O₂max is the maximum aerobic power capacity for an individual, and the quantity X is a power output expressed as a percentage of that maximum, or ...


3

VO2max is not super important for 10k. It's correlated with performance, but it's not a good predictor. (Source) Don't worry too much about HR or VO2max. You should focus on performance. If you're improving your times and running longer distances, then it doesn't matter if your watch says your VO2max is decreasing. If your resting HR is increasing, ...


3

While it's an interesting question, it would be a very short lived time anyway. VO2 max is the maximum oxygen your body can use at a given (usually fairly intense) activity level. If you exceed this work level, then you are working anaerobically, and the energy pathways for that are short lived at best. Up to VO2 max, your normal readings should be in the ...


3

I'm not positive about the premise here. There are certainly cases of runners having cyclist like VO2 levels. Also, cyclists are way more testing conscious. The fact of the matter is elite cycling is a heavily technologically based sport, while elite marathoning is not. Lance Armstrong was getting wind tunnel tested back in the day. Meanwhile, the ...


2

I'm basing a lot of this on my own personal experience so, by all means, take it as anecdotal if you'd like. I started exercising the week of my 34th birthday (about 8 months ago) after having smoked for 15-16 years and living a sedentary lifestyle. I discovered the heart rate zones early on, just like you, and I got my heart rate monitor (FitBit Charge HR)...


2

Garmin use the VO2 data supplied to them in tabular form from the Cooper Institute, for example here is the table for age 14 females: https://www.cooperinstitute.org/vault/2440/web/files/732.pdf You may be familiar with the Cooper Institute as they are the creator of the PACER test which is used across nearly all schools in the US as an assessment of ...


1

V̇O₂max work rate can typically be held only for around 8 minutes or so, so you're not going to be racing at V̇O₂max pace. And while the pace will be "close", it's in the nature of endurance that small reductions in work rate lead to much longer times to failure. Advanced 5k training programs often recommend high mileage. For example, 20km a week. 20km ...


1

When you perform aerobic exercise, your body utilises oxygen to perform work. As you increase the amount of work you do, the amount of oxygen used—oxygen uptake—increases until it has hit a maximum. That is VO₂max (or V̇O₂max, to make it clear that the "O₂" refers to oxygen, and where the dot above the V is because it is often given per kilogram of body ...


1

There is actually a very easy way of checking the strength and fitness of your heart using a heart rate monitor: measure your resting heart rate. Anything below 60BPM is better than average. Below 40BPM is getting close to elite endurance athlete levels of heart strength and fitness. A 20 minute time trial on an exercise bike that measures power output ...


1

V02max is more of an absolute number. Think of it like testing your max bench, or max vertical jump. It's the maximum amount of oxygen you can uptake at the time of testing. Something you can track over the course of a phase of programming, but you won't see much change in it, even from run to run. It'd be negligible from split to split. Not really worth it ...


1

Your question assumes that each blood type offers a different capacity to carry oxygen. Without going into scientific explanations, the easiest way to answer the question is to understand the role of Hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is a protein that serves as a transport mechanism to deliver oxygen to the body tissues. VO2Max is a measurement of how quickly the ...


1

A normal multivitamin is enough. You should be more concerned with your caloric intake and your macronutrient split. Your caloric intake should be at least the number of calories you burn. (There are calculators for that on the internet.) And your macronutrient split is the percentage of calories that come from protein, carbs (sugar), and fat. For example, ...


1

The shin splints likely have to do with your shoes, not your routine. The best shoes just keep your feet warm (if it's cold) and protect them from scratches. They shouldn't be tight on your feet, they shouldn't slide around too much, and they shouldn't constrain how your feet can move. Nike Frees, Vibram FiveFingers, Vivo Barefoots, Innov8 BareX, Feiyues and ...


1

It depends, there are quite a few different formulas available, depending on who was doing the research, and when it was performed. To some extent, the method used to determine the calories burned can have an effect on the formula. http://www.stanford.edu/~clint/Run_Walk2004a.rtf That is a link to a published study from Syracuse University, comparing ...


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